GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-02-05 09:27:15 +0000
    I am currently being forced to leave my home with my 9 year old child. When I started my tenancy last summer it was advertised as a fully managed property by the estate agents. Less than two weeks after I moved in that changed to a privately managed property. The landlord felt that turning up randomly was fine and was desperate to meet me and have ‘tea’. This made me very uncomfortable. After christmas I discovered that one of my neighbours had made a nasty complaint about me secretly so had an inspection. Landlord was fine about the conditions of both house and garden and my guinea pigs and promised to sort it out. Less than two weeks after this I was told that I was being kicked out due to the same neighbour complaining nonstop. He had been videoing me and my family in the garden and taking pictures of my pets and trespassing to get the footage as well as spying on us at half 11 at night. And I am the one being punished as according to the estate agent I am getting kicked out under section 21 of contract as the landlord cant be bothered dealing with this neighbour even though I found out she had been going to his house slagging me off. My rents paid up until end of May so will have to probably fight for it so I will have money to move on. Landlords have too much power against tenants. Things need tonchange.
  • commented 2015-02-04 17:00:34 +0000
    Private landlords seem to feel they hold some power over their tenants. mine began trying to place more restrictions on me within the property that weren’t stipulated in the contract (use of living spaces/ guests etc) it’s left me feeling insecure and uncomfortable in sonewhere that should be my home. My landlord (who is male) also feels it is appropriate to just pitch up at the property whether I am there or not and gives me no pre warning. I do not feel this is appropriate but also don’t feel I can really say much as he could just kick me out.
  • commented 2015-02-04 10:15:15 +0000
    Ms stanton,I raised the comment regarding discrimination of LEA tenants on this forum last summer. Thank you for reminding the new readers. Yes many are pensioners & others are mature students, working professional on 0-h or hour-contracts or simply people in employment who’s wages doesn’t cover the rent. rent poverty has prevented me from leaving a job that’s making me ill & to do a Masters Degree. As a teacher it would really benefit my career to obtain a Masters & as a subject specialist I would be more suited as a L4 Lecturer. My point with the last comment is that rent slavery & poverty ruins careers& health not just of the renter but also those involved in the renters life.
  • commented 2015-02-04 10:06:09 +0000
    I agree with Ms Morgan and would like to add that I believe that agents make their commission on ’ renewal of contract’, for some that means the tenant sign for another terms, for others, ending the tenancy and most likely evading explainhow the reason for it to both parties. The standard short hold tenancy therefore enable tenants & landlords to eat out of the agents hands.
  • commented 2015-02-04 08:04:57 +0000
    Good interview bu Alex Hilton on breakfast TV just now, talking about Letting Agents charges to tenants. As a landlord I am charged hundreds of pounds per tenant find, and I am not happy that the agents are fleecing my new tenants for a service that I have already paid for in full! However I do think Letting Agents should be able to take a modest refundable deposit from prospective tenants upon receipt of their application forms, to deter time-wasters.
  • commented 2015-02-04 08:01:05 +0000
    Can we lobby for rent control and anti-discrimination towards tenants on benefits, age, parents etc?

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Blog

Brighton and Bournemouth letting fees - all in one place

Even though the government has promised to ban letting fees, our crowdsourced research project at lettingfees.co.uk continues to build up a picture of renter exploitation around the country. Renters in Bournemouth and Brighton & Hove now have an online comparison of letting fees in their area, which will help them avoid the rogues who are either charging excessive fees or just not publishing theirs.

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Lessons from Germany: tenant power in the rental market

Last month the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) released its report “Lessons from Germany: Tenant power in the rental market”. It examines the relative strength of protection for German renters, and how these benefits might be brought across to England.

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Making housing about immigration continues to be a toxic mix

Back in late 2015, when the details about making landlords check the immigration status of prospective tenants was being debated in parliament, housing and migrant groups repeatedly warned government that this would lead to discrimination, and push vulnerable renters into precarious and hidden housing.

Today a new report from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI) on the 'Right to Rent' scheme confirms that warning, with shocking findings of non-British and non-white renters finding it more difficult to access a new tenancy.

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Government consults on banning orders - renters respond

We have put in our response to the government’s consultation on banning orders – the new mechanism to prevent criminals from operating in the rental market. That’s right, they aren’t banned already.

The government has asked what types of offences should be banworthy, and set a deadline of midnight tonight.

We asked our supporters for their experiences earlier in the week, dozens of you responded, and the feedback has helped shape our response to the government.

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Housing White Paper: where do we stand now?

Well, the Housing White Paper was a massive disappointment. After an exciting glimpse on Sunday of moves to "incentivise" longer tenancies, on Tuesday it became clear that those incentives were existing government subsidies for companies building new homes. Number of beneficiaries: 80,322 (not counting the companies who would have offered longer tenancies anyway).

For the 4.3 million households in existing properties? The vague undertaking to "consider what more we can do to support families already renting privately, while encouraging continued investment in the sector." Which gives little hope to people who don't live with their family and a lot of hope to property speculators.

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Housing White Paper: Our immediate reaction

Commenting on the Housing White Paper, Dan Wilson Craw, Director of Generation Rent, said:

“Sajid Javid has the right analysis about the plight of renters, but his White Paper has failed to offer us anything of substance.

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Removing criminals from the housing market

Although the 2016 Housing and Planning Act paved the way for the mass sell-off of council houses, eroded security for social tenants and watered down the affordability of new homes, it also made it possible to ban criminals from letting out properties, with new Banning Orders. 

As we await the Housing White Paper to see how far the government will go to improve private renting further - and how much it will atone for the damage it caused to social housing - we are drafting our feedback on how Banning Orders will work. 

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Are landlord incentives the answer to tenant insecurity?

Today's Observer declares that the "home-owning democracy", that elusive vision beloved of the Conservatives since Thatcher, is finished. 

Obs_0502.jpg 

Ahead of next week's Housing White Paper, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid says, "We understand people are living longer in private rented accommodation", which is the closest the government has come to admitting that their policies to help first-time buyers can only go so far. 

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Housing White Paper: could Starter Homes be genuinely affordable?

As the publication date for the government's Housing White Paper approaches, we and groups across the the housing world are hoping for an announcement that will signal a 'whole new mindset', as the Secretary of State has promised.

One item that will be included is confirmation of how the government's long-running Starter Homes policy will work - and the detail will tell us how far it will go towards slowing the affordability crisis for first-time buyers. This is the government's flagship policy that was pitched as "turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy".

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Are banks behind your latest rent rise?

This morning, Mortgage Strategy magazine and the Daily Telegraph reported that Santander is requiring its buy-to-let borrowers to raise the rent on their tenants as high as possible.

The bank even demands that landlords get a valuation of the market rent every time the tenancy is up for renewal and then "take all steps to ensure that the review [with the tenant] takes place and leads to the maximum increase in the rent which can reasonably be achieved."

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