GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-04-13 20:40:06 +0100
    I agree that private landlords contribute very little to society, but I am not sure that there would ever be the political will to stop them completely.

    What we need is government to understand the issues and start making private landlord pay payments on the gross rents not net profit after they have stripped all the costs out (including charitable donations which are effectively private education fees for children and grandchildren)

    If anyone can get me in front of the next housing minister, I would gladly help shape a fair housing policy !
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:41:41 +0100
    John, I’m not commenting on whether or not Landlords are good, bad or indifferent. Frankly, if you choose to rent on the private sector, this is a chance you have to take, and there are bodies in existence with whom you can take matters of this nature up. I’m saying, bluntly, that private landlords should be outlawed as they are selfishly taking houses away from prospective owner occupiers, and causing misery to that generation, to selfishly feather their own nests. Rental properties should be owned only by local authorities, housing associations, bodies such as universities where appropriate, or multinational companies for employees who they may need to move about the world. Not greedy speculators…
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:30:55 +0100
    I feel the best way to get a fair deal for Landlords and tenants is for all private and housing associations to be licensed to be a Landlord and that they adhere to certain safety and standards for the best protection for tenants, and if Licence revoked they must put right or be unable to take take rents until they do, and the licence fee monies to pay for licence monitors assessors mediators, to work on behalf of Landlords and tenants.
  • commented 2015-04-12 12:32:31 +0100
    Thanks for your support, Lee. I actually think some of the penalties should be even stronger. Buy to let mortgages should be made illegal, an annual punitive tax should be levied on the total value of the portfolio of any British domiciled landlord, and profit made on the sale of rental property to be taxed at above 90%. Profit on the sale of rental property owned by overseas individuals or companies to be at least 95% and a ban on any rental payments leaving this country, so that money so raised goes back into the British economy, not somewhere abroad.
    As and when your kids get to the age of leaving home, changes like this may mean they have options. My son, and thousands of his generation, have been sold down the river and terribly exploited by greedy, selfish buy to let landlords who make profits on the back of this generation’s misfortunes. Shame on all landlords and managing agents. How would you like society to exploit your own personal situation so brutally?
  • commented 2015-04-12 08:46:34 +0100
    To create fairness in the system the country’ housing policy needs an overhaul. Buy to let landlords have significantly benefited from low interest rates, lack of new property being built , growing population and recently a tightening of the mortgage regulations.

    Residential Investment Property should be subject to a property tax as a percentage of market rent (say 30%) irrespective of the entity and jurisdiction that owns it. Any further profit will be subject normal tax legislation. This will not only deter some investors but also raise a significant amount of tax revenue that the government could use to support house building and first time buyer schemes/projects.

    Stamp duty should be higher for investment property purchases with the additional funds raised used to subsidise first time buyer stamp duty costs.

    It should be made law that no property should be sold or gifted at undervalue which will again increase tax revenue.

    For the record I am a 45 year old that managed to buy my first property in 1995. From a personal position I sit comfortably living in my own house in an affluent London suburb. My oldest child is still in primary school, so I am not looking for them to move out just yet.

    I have no personal axe to grind but feel that will the size of this island and its growing population this country’s housing policy can be bold and fair so that that it benefits all of society now and in the future.
  • commented 2015-04-07 15:15:35 +0100
    I’m sorry, Dave, I disagree with much of your logic here, and those with longer term plans merely take property off the market and away from prospective owner occupiers for longer periods of time. The facts are that buy to let landlords will get a mortgage more easily than prospective owner occupiers, based solely on the amount they state they can let the property for. They then buy the property, and potentially let it out to the same prospective buyer who has been turned down for a mortgage on the same house, often for a rent greater than the mortgage repayment would have been. Result – the landlord gets the mortgage paid for him, gets tax allowances as stated, and makes all the profit on the increase in the capital value. OK, there’s a tax implication, but it’s not nearly enough to dissuade landlords from doing this, so would be owner occupiers get squeezed out. Landlords and foreign speculators thus make huge profits, the taxman gets his cut, and the younger generation never have the prospect of owning their own house. The house prices are always rising out of their reach, and the speculators pick up the pieces. If a landlord does overreach himself, he just sells one of his portfolio off, probably to another speculator, writes any loss off against tax, and the circle goes on. Banning all buy to let mortgages stops this vicious circle, allows building societies to have more funds to offer to owner occupiers, and slows the inflationary circle down. If people must speculate with property, let them play with their own cash, not borrowed, in the commercial property market, where firms are more able to pay. When I saw Dan on the BBC News, I assumed this forum might be able to take up such a cause with more public exposure. If this is not the case, I’m wasting my, and everyone else here’s time with my views.

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Blog

Proposed ban on letting fees unveiled

For four and a half months we've been waiting with bated breath for the government's proposals to ban fees, and today they were unveiled as the government finally launched its consultation.

The policy is no half-measure - tenants will not have to pay fees in connection with their tenancy outside of rent, refundable deposit, holding deposit and extra services they require during the course of the tenancy (e.g. replacing lost keys).

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Generation Rent wins prestigious campaigning award

Last night, Generation Rent was handed the Housing and Homelessness Award at the 2017 Sheila McKechnie Foundation awards in London.

The award was in recognition of our work in the past year to mobilise renters as a political force, which culminated in the government’s announcement of a ban on letting fees in November.

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Four new trustees help bolster the organisation

We are pleased to welcome four new trustees who have joined the Generation Rent board since the start of the year.

Daniel Bentley, Sean Cosgrove, Betsy Dillner and Hannah Williams bring with them decades of experience in political communications, financial management, movement building and business development.

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Housing Greater Manchester

When you mention the housing crisis, people tend to think of London and of campaign groups like Focus E15. There is good reason for this - the capital has experienced the worst excesses of the housing crisis, and the pushback there has been among the most dynamic in the country. Yet London is not alone in having a housing crisis, and in recent years the effects of a dysfunctional housing system have been making themselves felt in Greater Manchester.

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Minimum acceptable living standards in London - and how housing costs cut right through them

This week Trust for London, in conjunction with Loughborough University, published their latest report on a Minimum Income Standard (MIS) for London - with figures updated from their first report in 2015, and with a focus in this research on families.

The MIS compares costs between London and the rest of the UK to show the difference between the minimum needed for an acceptable standard of living - with that minimum based on a list of goods discussed and agreed upon by the public.

We can draw many conclusions from the report, and though it should surprise no one that the cost of housing is a major differential between London and the rest of the UK, the research shows that the rising cost of private rents in the lower end of the market stops a large number of households achieving the MIS.

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Rate your landlord and more on Marks Out Of Tenancy

Ben Yarrow is Founder of Marks Out Of TenancyFor more useful websites for renters, visit our resources page.

Ask anyone who’s renting, everyone’s got a story to share. Whether it’s good, bad or just plain ugly; every renter has had their own experience with a landlord or a letting agent that can give us insight into what can be expected as a potential tenant of theirs.    

Now, while it can be fun to wax lyrical about rental horror stories, we wanted to figure out how this exchange of experiences could be harnessed to the benefit of generation rent - so we created Marks out of Tenancy.

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Home ownership at 30-year low

Just 62.9% of England's population owns their home - the lowest proportion since 1985. And the private rented population now stands at 4.5m households, up on last year and bigger than in 1961, when slum landlords like Peter Rachman were making tenants' lives a misery.

These are the big findings of the English Housing Survey Headline Report, the first of two releases of the government-commissioned survey for 2015-16. 

At this rate, there will be more private renters than mortgage holders in just five years' time. It's already the largest tenure in London.

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Brighton and Bournemouth letting fees - all in one place

Even though the government has promised to ban letting fees, our crowdsourced research project at lettingfees.co.uk continues to build up a picture of renter exploitation around the country. Renters in Bournemouth and Brighton & Hove now have an online comparison of letting fees in their area, which will help them avoid the rogues who are either charging excessive fees or just not publishing theirs.

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Lessons from Germany: tenant power in the rental market

Last month the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) released its report “Lessons from Germany: Tenant power in the rental market”. It examines the relative strength of protection for German renters, and how these benefits might be brought across to England.

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Making housing about immigration continues to be a toxic mix

Back in late 2015, when the details about making landlords check the immigration status of prospective tenants was being debated in parliament, housing and migrant groups repeatedly warned government that this would lead to discrimination, and push vulnerable renters into precarious and hidden housing.

Today a new report from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI) on the 'Right to Rent' scheme confirms that warning, with shocking findings of non-British and non-white renters finding it more difficult to access a new tenancy.

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