GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-08-24 11:55:21 +0100
    Rents should be capped depending on the quality and quantity of the services in the accommodation. How is it legal to keep putting tent up above inflation with no extra service? There are basic necessities like heating that should be obligatory and if they are not installed then rent should be capped. Landlords get away with murder on the quality they provide for the ridiculously high price of rent.
  • commented 2015-08-22 17:27:04 +0100
    Demand legislation to make it obligatory for landlords to be registered so tenants know where to go if their home needs repairs. Follow Wales example
  • commented 2015-08-16 01:31:08 +0100
    Power to renters!
  • commented 2015-06-30 20:04:30 +0100
    I voted for the political party who had pledged to tackle the unfairness relating to tenants who do not get a fair deal from landlords. Sadly, they did not win the election. All that is left is to put pressure on the current government on this issue. I am not holding my breath as they have announced they wish to allow the sell off of social houses.
  • commented 2015-05-27 05:06:15 +0100
    Things appear not to have changed much. At least not for the better. I remember paying exhorbitant rent for a small furnished room with a broken bed. When the little “Baby Belling” cooker in the corner of the single room gave me electric shocks, I was told by the landlord that,“If you don’t like the cooker just don’t use it!” (But then most of his attention was going into maximising profits from his “private hire/mini-cab” business. So what could I expect.)
  • commented 2015-05-13 21:34:26 +0100
    Firstly there are many young adults who don’t live at home and simply can’t get the experience they need to start a job so they are stuck with a rubbishly paid apprenticeship wage and 400pm is not enough to live on quite frankly. Not when you need to put food in the cupboards, paying rent as well as maintaining a professional look, ie smart clothing for the job. There isn’t anything that helps the young adults that are really trying to do everything they can to get to that goal of having a job, career and a self contained flat/house for themselves but how are they supposed to afford one when they are on an apprenticeship wage? Some properties starting in the region of 800pm in cities and therefore is not fair on the people who have an apprenticeship and working 40 hours a week for £400pm. It needs to be changed. Some companies hire apprentices cause they are affectly cheaper to hire! Money needs to come up and fast minimum wage needs to come up and living and tax needs to come down. It’s not fair that all the politicians are so wealthy I’d love to see you all living off £400pm and living in a council flat or a room in a house and doing the hours. Maybe there should be a program about it! It’s ridiculous, everyone should be on a wage of £10 an hour regardless of the age of you are if your doing the same job there shouldn’t be any arguments in the wages, give us all a chance to pay less tax, tax the rich more than the poor we are the ones suffering and I think politicians should be taxed twice as much. Your all making money by employing members of the family so you have nothing to worry about your still going to be rich and have someone to drive you around and pick up your dry cleaning.

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Blog

Six reasons why today’s renters pay more than previous generations

The harsh reality of the UK’s sometimes savage housing market is that more people are renting their homes until later in life but paying more for the privilege of doing so than their parents did.

In England the number of private renters has increased from two million to 4.5 million between 1999 and 2015 while renting a home has been eating up a steadily increasing proportion of renters’ income, rising from 8% during the late 1960s to over 27% today, on average. Here we look at the key trends driving up rents across the nation in recent years.

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Landlord tax evasion - what do we know?

A few weeks ago, the London Borough of Newham revealed that 13,000 local landlords had failed to declare their rental income, prompting estimates that £200m of tax was being evaded in London alone.

Today, Parliament has published an answer from the Treasury Minister Mel Stride to Frank Field, who asked what assessment the government had made of this. The Minister directed him (and us) to this information on tax gaps (pp54-5).

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MPs debate letting fee ban

The ban on letting fees is currently the government's flagship policy to help renters, and we're currently waiting for a draft bill to be published, which follows a consultation that we and hundreds of our supporters responded to.

In the meantime, MPs gave us a taste of how the legislation will proceed in Parliament yesterday morning by debating the subject for the first time since last year's Autumn Statement.

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London Housing - a new opportunity to push for greater security

Delayed from August, this week saw the publication of the London Mayor's draft housing strategy, which is now open for consultation for three months.

Covering all housing policy from leasehold reform to tackling street homelessness, the strategy also has a specific section devoted to the private rented sector. With a quarter of London's children in the private rented sector, and millions of renters living in poverty, we all know how urgently action is needed.

We'll be coming back to parts of the strategy in the coming weeks, but here we just focus on the main headlines for renters.

The strategy builds on the Mayor's manifest commitment and previous public statements, and although the Mayor lacks the powers to fundamentally transform London's PRS, there are nonetheless some steps forward and potential to go further.

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The Other Waitrose Effect - the hidden costs of gentrification

Is a new Waitrose in your neighbourhood a cause for excitement, or a troubling omen for your future in the area? 

A new study reveals that the high-end supermarket is linked with rising evictions of private tenants in areas they open up in.

The analysis, conducted by Oxford University academic David Adler for Generation Rent, found that the arrival of a new store was associated with an increase in the number of evictions of between 25% and 50%.

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Great cheese selection, but will you be around to enjoy it?

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Giving people the right to a safe home

This week saw the introduction of Karen Buck MP's Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation and Liability for Housing Standards) Bill, a private member's bill which will now have its second reading in parliament on Friday 19 January 2018.

The bill seeks to update the law requiring rented homes to be presented and maintained in a state fit for human habitation - updated because the current law only requires this of homes with a rent of up to £80 per year in London, and £52 elsewhere!

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National study finds tenants optimistic but rental market oppressive

Every year the government runs the English Housing Survey. General findings are published in February, then, to the delight of housing geeks, the juicy detail on the different subsections of the market arrives in July. We've taken a look at the findings for 2015-16, published last week.

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Queen's Speech 2017: are you listening Westminster?

Before today's Queen's Speech, which set out the government's parliamentary programme for the next two years, there were two theories about how housing and private renting might feature, and what kind of prominence it would be given.

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If London housebuilding is reliant on overseas investment, where do we go from here?

Commissioned in Autumn 2016, the final report of the London Mayor’s investigation into the role of overseas investment in housing was published last week – but its findings can be read in very different ways.

Based on research by the LSE, its major conclusion and argument is that off-plan and pre-sales to the overseas market are integral to the current development model in London – and therefore also key to leveraging more affordable housing through section 106 agreements on those sites. 

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Renters vote - and cause another political upset

The results are in, and the UK's voters have delivered yet another shock.

The dust still has to settle but one thing is already apparent: the votes of renters had an impact yesterday. Twenty of the 32 seats that the Conservatives lost to Labour and the Liberal Democrats had more renters than average. Back at the 2011 census, those 32 seats had an average private renter population of 19% - it was 16% in the country as a whole.

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