GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-02-06 21:48:20 +0000
    I read it very simply, James. The Government is belatedly trying to make it a fairer playing field. Greedy private landlords are alarmed at losing easy pickings and huge capital gains, and are trying to offload as much of the increased costs as possible onto their long suffering and helpless tenants, who STILL can’t afford to buy their own properties to live in, let alone to extort money from. You’re the one who reads these things with your own warped interpretation.
  • commented 2016-02-06 19:15:58 +0000
    You still don’t get it do you FW? This attack on landlords will hurt tenants a whole lot more. Rents are already increasing, as they did in Ireland when a milder form of this mortgage interest limitation was tried. There with only a 75% relief limitation they went up almost 50%. Your bitterness blinds you. I have never said anything about altruism, that’s your take on things. What I have said is that I keep my rents low and that has been true but I too have started putting them up. My tenants have all accepted the increases because they understand why it’s happening and they’ve never had an increase anyway. Some of them have been with me many years. One tenant has even volunteered an increase without me mentioning it to him. I take it you didn’t read the article on the Say No To George site or you may better understand why there is a housing crisis, why the private rented sector has actually helped to relieve pressure on prices and how it isn’t that hard to put a plan together for the only thing that will help – i.e building houses! You just want to moan and gripe about your lot without making any attempt to understand the situation. Let’s see if you can be bothered to read this and understand the misery Clause 24 may cause http://www.property118.com/new-landlord-tax-could-affect-tenants/83886/
  • commented 2016-02-06 13:40:48 +0000
    My previous post was not aimed at James personally, but at all private landlords with the same viewpoint…

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Blog

Government launches secret landlord blacklist

Landlords get to ask tenants for a reference, but there's no way we can check what a prospective landlord is like. That's why we've long been calling for a central database that names and shames criminal landlords.

From today we've got one. But there's a catch: only local councils can access it.

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Fees ban concerns remain as Bill completes first stage

The Commons Housing Committee has published its report on the Draft Tenants' Fees Bill today, making recommendations to the government for when it formally introduces the Bill to Parliament. 

Generation Rent, along with charities, landlord groups, local councils and other industry organisations, gave evidence to the inquiry earlier in the year. There were positive outcomes on rents and deposits, but more work is needed to make sure the ban covers all fees - and that it's enforced properly.

Here's a summary of what we asked for - and what we got.

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Making deposits work for tenants

One reason the housing market is so stacked against renters is the high cost of taking our business elsewhere, so one of the ways we can make renters more powerful is to make moving house easier.

As our research site lettingfees.co.uk discovered, a typical household could save £404 when they move once the letting fees ban comes in. But a bigger cost - in the short term at least - is the damage deposit worth up to six weeks' rent.

We estimate that 86% of renters get most or all of their deposit back, but only after they've already moved into a new home, so achieving that involves raiding their savings, or borrowing money. 

That's why today we're calling on the government to start allowing renters to transfer part of their deposit to a new home once they've paid the final month's rent.  

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Planned shake-up of rental market complaints system

Last October, Sajid Javid, the Secretary of State for Communities (and now Housing) said that he wanted to start requiring landlords to join a redress scheme if they did not already use a letting agent. 

The government is now consulting on plans for this. The good news is it is considering doing away with the three different schemes tenants have to navigate when they have a complaint at the moment.

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Rented London: How local authorities can support private renters

Local council elections are taking place in London in a few months. And just like the 2016 Mayoral race, these contests will be dominated by the city's housing crisis. From Haringey to Kensington and Chelsea, Londoners are looking for secure and affordable homes, and asking their councils to respond.

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First-time buyers taking out longer loans to escape the rental sector

The latest English Housing Survey report is out today with the highlights of their findings for 2016-17. 

The private rented sector has continued to grow. The population now stands at 4.7m households, with 27% of families renting from a private landlord.

It is once again the largest tenure in London (if you separate outright and mortgaged ownership), and its doubling outside the capital in the past decade illustrates the national impact the housing crisis has had.

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Homes fit for humans one step closer

Third time was the charm for efforts to revive the right of renters to sue their landlord for safety failures.

Karen Buck's Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Bill was talked out in 2015, then a Labour amendment to the Housing Bill in 2016 was defeated. But today, after winning the support of more than 100 MPs who attended the Second Reading debate, the Bill passed unanimously and is a step closer to being law. 

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Fitness for Human Habitation: Another milestone in the long road to a decent private rented sector

In another sign of the growing importance of the renters' movement in the UK, government announced over the weekend that it would be supporting measured outlined in Karen Buck MP's upcoming private member's bill, which would allow private and social tenants to take legal action against their landlord where their home is not deemed 'fit for human habitation'.

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The return of 'fitness for human habitation' - will MPs finally give us this protection?

In ten days time, parliament breaks for the Christmas recess.

When they return in January, they will have an opportunity to support a simple change in law that would provide better protections for renters.

The question is, given that they have missed this opportunity before - will parliament do the right thing this time?

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Getting the best from Newham's renewed landlord licensing scheme

This week those campaigning for a better private rented sector received an early Christmas present with the announcement that the Communities Secretary had approved the majority of Newham's proposal for a renewed borough-wide landlord licensing scheme.

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