GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-04-06 11:38:05 +0100
    Sheffield Residential – Agent. The accommodation was first class but complete nightmare trying to get deposit back. Needed documentary evidence of payment of all utility bills and council tax. Electricity company messed up account and Sheffield Residential would not accept this. After almost 12 months reluctantly accepted letters from all service providers. Then took a long while to refund deposit using excuses like “with our accounts”. Would never use them again
  • commented 2016-02-08 10:22:37 +0000
    Foxwatcher, if you are indeed one of those people constrained by the MMR then you have my every sympathy. It’s all very well saying we must control lending but if all it does is prevent perfectly capable people getting on the ladder then it’s a false policy that doesn’t work.

    My good wishes are genuine. Despite me being on the ‘wrong’ side of the fence, Im a huge believer in home ownership and the ability of the young to buy for themselves. I hope you find what you’re looking for. If it makes any difference, I spent 12 years around the 1990s saving for my first deposit – left home at 31! Not ideal I know but we’ve all been there – and that was before consumer BTL even existed! All the best. JR
  • commented 2016-02-07 22:44:34 +0000
    James R, we may indeed not agree on private landlords, but much of what you said in that last post I could have written myself. And your examples of friends with large deposits who can’t get mortgages on sensible properties in their area are ones I very much identify with, shall we say. It IS madness, as you say. I guess if there was a solution, it would’ve been identified and dealt with by now. I’m just trying to make my feelings known on one bit of it that does seem, to me, to have a theoretical solution, fraught with practical difficulties as they may be. Thanks for your best wishes. I appreciate them, and your understanding that there is another point of view here.
  • commented 2016-02-07 21:12:35 +0000
    Foxwatcher. Hmmmm, I’d be inclined to agree on the shared-ownership thing. It’s a very long way from perfect and the problems you mention are very real and widespread. I have some experience here. To what extent are you held back by the Mortgage Market Review? – a good friend of mine has a 50% deposit in a relatively cheap area of the country and still can’t get a loan! Madness. (Similarly, some very wealthy friends can’t get a loan either even though it’s for a small fraction of their cash worth – again, madness).

    We’ll clearly never agree on private renting. In a capitalist, ‘free’ society we pay for everything, even the essentials. The supermarkets, water companies, heating, fuel, even clothes – they all make money out of us, out of essentials, out of stuff many people can’t afford. I see your point on housing, but unless everything goes over to your profit-free utopia, it can’t work.

    Consider my local ‘caring, socialist’ council who charge £7/day to park at the railway station. Ok you don’t HAVE to drive to the station, but most people in reality DO HAVE to. It’s too difficult not to. For a space 12×8′ of plain Tarmac, you have to pay the equivalent of nearly FOUR TIMES as much as one of my fully-equipped and beautiful three bedroom houses. And you get a lot more use out of a house 24 hours a day than you do a square of Tarmac.

    The ‘expense’ is all relative and no one ever really provides anything unless there’s something in it for them. It’s just the way of the world. But if you’re home-hunting, I do wish you well.
  • commented 2016-02-07 18:21:45 +0000
    So you do still support the misery that all millions of people will have inflicted on them then. That’s very telling FW, very telling indeed.

    As for the Chancellor knowing what he is doing, yes we certainly agree on that too, however what he is doing is, it would seem, very far removed from what you think he is doing. I’m afraid you’re blinded by your your passion, to see the truth. In a couple of years time it may dawn on you that you were wrong because the evidence keeps being presented to you and you keep ignoring it.

    No you haven’t at all produced a plan to solve the housing crisis as far as I can see. You want all rental property state owned. That isn’t a plan, it’s not building houses is it? This Government say they’re going to build 400k houses. That isn’t a plan, it’s an aspiration as your desire is. Even if they achieve it then it doesn’t even keep up with demand. How many more refugees will be coming our way to put on extra demand I wonder?

    Under this Government the UK has built less houses in the last 5 years than anytime since the 1920s, apart from the war. If they’d actually had a plan in that time, the building industry would not have suffered the way it has and we’d have a damn site more houses in the country than we have now. And you think Mr O, who has no real experience of any proper job, or has any worthwhile qualifications other than a degree in history, is going to solve this?

    If you really rate him then take a look at this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOhwOzsNd9Q. This is the Chancellor of the Exchequer and he turns up to PM Question TIme in this state. Good grief!
  • commented 2016-02-07 18:01:28 +0000
    James M, it seems I have to spell it out. Please pay attention.

    1) I’m sure the Chancellor knows what he is doing. He has stated it is his intention to remove the inequality between BTLs and OOs. By implication, he wants to stop BTL.

    2) Anyone going into BTL without large long term capital profit as one outcome being apparent to them is too stupid to be allowed to do so. They may dress it up with a variety of other excuses, much as you do, but that’s a main driver.

    3) I have offered my solution to this part of the housing crisis. You may not yet have troubled to read my post of an hour or so ago – I’m sure you will, you like reading thoroughly.

    4) As stated, this is only one aspect. Others, such as immigration, house building programmes, birth rates, local infrastructure etc. are not part of this forum. No doubt you will continue to use them as an excuse for your greed.

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Blog

May removes yet another obstacle to council home building

This week has been the Conservative Party's conference, and their chance to match Labour's pledges to abolish Section 21 and seed-fund renters' unions. 

There is a lot of worry among the party faithful that they are not doing enough about housing - the defining political issue of a generation. But with consultation responses on security being scrutinised by officials back in Whitehall, and Help to Buy facing negative attention, their options were narrow.

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Mayor of London backs indefinite tenancies

At the Labour party conference this week, delegates adopted a motion to (among other things) "Help private renters with an end to ‘no fault’ evictions, controls on rents and new minimum standards, including three year tenancies as standard." 

The BBC reported on this commitment, but beyond the wording of this motion and John Healey's speech, we haven't had any more detail of what this would entail. 

Luckily, Sadiq Khan has obliged. While the Mayor of London is not a member of the Shadow Cabinet, last week's publication of his response to the government's consultation on longer tenancies revealed that he is calling for much the same thing, plus some more idea of what it might look like in practice.

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Labour signs up to #endsection21

We kind of knew this already, but Labour is officially backing our campaign to end Section 21 and will scrap landlords' ability to evict tenants without giving a reason. It was reported by the BBC this morning, was part of the shadow Housing Secretary John Healey's speech in the conference centre, and then a motion on housing that included it was passed.

This follows members of the End Unfair Evictions doing a lot of work behind the scenes to successfully get local Labour parties to support the motion.

An even bigger piece of news was a £20m pot to jumpstart tenants' unions in the UK, reported by the Independent

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Before you rent: How to protect your legal rights

Finding a flat to rent in England can be tough. The stress only compounds when things don’t go as planned. When I lived in London, I got caught out when my landlord insisted on “renegotiating” the tenancy terms after I had paid a holding deposit (a troublingly common practice in the market).

Here are twelve things tenants can do to protect their rights, which helped me succeed in my legal claim against my landlord.

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Cabinet split over tenancy reform

On Wednesday, the Sun reported that 10 Downing Street and the Treasury are blocking moves to legislate for longer tenancies.

Although the recently closed consultation left open the question of making the new tenancy mandatory or voluntary, the same newspaper had previously reported that the Housing Secretary, James Brokenshire, wanted all tenants to get it.

That sets up a big internal government battle over tenants' rights as the Conservative Party worries more and more about winning over younger voters. 

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Public backs better security for renters

As the consultation period on the government's proposals for longer tenancies draws to a close - the deadline to respond is this Sunday - we are handing in our End Unfair Evictions petition to the Ministry of Housing today. It passed 50,000 signatures on Tuesday, helped along by #VentYourRent.

And if that wasn't enough to make the government pay attention, new polling from Survation finds that our demands have the backing of the wider public, including Conservative voters.

Survation_2018.png

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No-fault evictions drive up homelessness

Section 21 is the leading cause of statutory homelessness. This law allows evictions with no reason needed, and this is one more reason why we should scrap it.

To some extent, this is stating the bleeding obvious. Since 2012, the end of a private tenancy has been the leading cause of homelessness cases accepted by local authorities, but until now no one has specifically pointed the finger at Section 21. Today, we've been able to demonstrate it.

Homelessness.png

Source: Ministry of Housing

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Proof that millions of renters are failed by unfair rental laws

The latest English Housing Survey was out last week, and the results are further evidence for what we’ve been arguing for years: England’s rental laws are making life insecure and expensive for growing numbers of people.  

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Four early victories for the End Unfair Evictions campaign

It is less than a month since we launched our joint campaign - with ACORN, the New Economics Foundation and the London Renters Union - to end section 21 no-fault evictions, and we've already had some major successes. 

Here are four things we can celebrate already.

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A victory on tenant security, but the campaign continues

After reports in the Sunday papers, late yesterday afternoon the Ministry of Housing published its long-awaited consultation paper on "Overcoming Barriers to Longer Tenancies in the Private Rented Sector".

It allows us a moment to celebrate the first success of the End Unfair Evictions campaign: an acceptance by the government that private tenancy law is failing England's tenants - just as our petition passes 40,000 signatures

Leaving the detail of the policy to one side for now, it is significantly the first time the government has considered a change to tenancy law. Up to now ministers have been talking of merely "encouraging" landlords to offer better terms - while most landlords might do this, a lot of tenants would get no benefit. We have been arguing that we need full reform and, while incentives are still an option, mandatory reform is now on the table.

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