GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2019-04-17 09:02:12 +0100
    I have just been served a Section 21. What date is the section being scrapped?
  • commented 2019-04-15 11:42:30 +0100
    Good news today. Still some way to go though, Labour are concerned Landlords could still force tenants out by making an unrealistically high rent hike, while so-called legitimate reasons such as the landlord wanting to move in themselves or sell the property could still be a loophole (I’ve known friends be evicted so the landlord can place some random member of their extended family in, and putting the property on the market isn’t a guarantee it will be sold, so it could just be going through the motions to justify evicting the tenant).

    Allowing the landlord to evict a tenant in order to sell the property is still putting their financial rights above the tenants human rights. After all in very few cases could the landlord actually argue that not being able to sell the property would cause them financial hardship, and you can sell a property with an in-situ tenant, it’s just it would affect the property value, but that shouldn’t be the point. Making one person homeless so that another person can get a little icing on top of their cash windfall.

    Also, I’m a little concerned that today’s news could lead to a spate of evictions as some landlords decide they’d rather get out of the housing game than operate under new legislation.
  • commented 2019-04-15 08:56:34 +0100
    Seen this today? No-fault evictions to be banned in England https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-47927706
  • commented 2019-04-10 17:29:13 +0100
    I think your org is absolutely essential as landlords seem to be a law unto themselves and we know that I think its around 25% or so of MP’s are landlords too. However there is political help on the way-and it can only be solved politically in my opinion by voting Labour. We have a new Labour party now under Corbyn who’s unashamedly on the side of the poor. You can tell this as all the millionaire media can’t stand him and McDonnell. And the BBC are on the side of the property owning classes too
  • commented 2019-03-19 19:09:57 +0000
    I am currently renting a council flat, having rented privately for the past seven years. In my last private rented property I was paying 47% of my net income. Now I’m paying around 25% of that to the council in rent and life is easier for me. I would advise apporaching the local authority or housing association(s) if anyone is struggling with paying private rent. My local authority were accepting but others may be stricter deponding on who they accept onto their register. Nothing ventured, nothing gained.
  • commented 2019-03-19 18:13:28 +0000
    I was forced to live in a very mouldy property for 3 years with my sick mother until she died and we agreed not to complete about the mould for fear of not having our tenancy extended since they would only extend 6 months at a time. When it came time to move out the landlords not only kept my entire £900 deposit on the basis of the mould (which was not our fault – we did nothing in the house except live in it and kept it heated and ventilated even buying a £300 dehumidifier to keep it under control) they’re also now demanding £400 more IN ADDITION to the deposit they’ve already taken. Private renting is a disgrace in this country.

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Blog

"My letting agent lied to me about the tenants fee ban"

By Samira* 

I’m currently looking for a new home. My flat is being sold and my current estate agents aren’t being as supportive as I hoped so I started casting my net wider - looking at properties with other agents.

I’d seen a house I really liked and was chatting through with the estate agent the next steps. That’s when I started to get suspicious: one estate agency said the ban on letting fees was “like Brexit” in that it was being continually pushed back and might not even happen. He told me I shouldn’t wait to sign after 1st June (when the ban comes into force) because the fees ban might not happen and by then I’d have missed out on some really great properties. I left that meeting feeling confused - was he right about the law?

I went to another agency who didn’t seem to know about the Tenant Fees Act at all and gave me the same advice “don’t wait for June 1st, the ban doesn’t exist”. Luckily, I’m not in a rush to move just yet but both agents ran and text me multiple times, pushing me to sign before June.

I was cautious, everyone I know who rents thought the ban was coming in on 1st June, but hearing two professionals deny it made me doubt myself.


So I did my research on the Parliament website and took a look at Generation Rent’s advice and I found out the ban is definitely coming into force on 1st June. It will mean that if you sign a contract after 1st June, your letting agent and landlord will only be able to take payments for:

  • Rent
  • Security deposit – capped at 5 weeks rent
  • Holding deposit – capped at 1 weeks rent
  • Early termination payment
  • Change of sharer fee (shouldn’t be more than £50)
  • Charge for lost keys or security device
  • Charge for interest on late rent payments


I’ve lost my faith in agents now. For someone to outright lie about a law they’re obliged to follow, in order to manipulate me into spending hundreds of fees, made me feel let down - house hunting has now become a chore and something I’m not excited about, purely based on how estate agents have made me feel, rather than based on the properties themselves.


The agents followed up with me, texting me 3 days in a row saying I could pay the fees over the phone as soon as I submitted an application. This also seemed kind of suspect, as usually, I’ve applied to properties then had to wait a few days for confirmation that I’m the selected tenant, at which point fees are paid to do referencing. I do wonder if they said I could pay as soon as I had applied, in order to ensure they get as many tenants into their properties before the ban comes in.


I’m so glad that I did my research - it’s likely that I saved myself £400 by not signing that contract - let alone all the future fees I could have been charged for.


If you’ve had an experience like mine then get in touch with Generation Rent. They are putting together a team of volunteers to mystery shop letting agents and make sure they are giving the right advice to tenants. I know not all letting agents are like this but we need to hold the bad ones to account.

To join the mystery shopping team at Generation Rent email georgie@generationrent.org, or join the whatsapp group.

You can also report agents that are misbehaving here

*Samira is a false name to protect the identity of this renter.

Revealed: unfair letting agent practices to watch out for

We're very grateful to Which?, the consumer rights organisation, for their latest investigation into letting agents. A mystery-shopping exercise, targeting 20 agents around the country, revealed practices that potentially breach the law: from denying would-be tenants the opportunity to review terms and conditions before putting down money, to opaque fees.

This piece of work is particularly useful because it gives tenants an idea of what bad practice to watch out for (and challenge) the next time you're trying to find a new home. Here's what they found...

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Tenancy reform and ending section 21: making this promise a reality

After the Government announced they will scrap section 21 'no fault' evictions and introduce open-ended tenancies, the End Unfair Evictions campaign coalition took a moment to celebrate. But the reality is that there is still much work to do. This sea change in tenancy law and renter rights will not happen straight away. First there will be a consultation (out 'shortly') on what the new open-ended tenancy model will look like, including legitimate possession grounds. Generation Rent will be talking to tenants, landlords and government to get the detail of the new tenancy right.

Once the consultation period closes, the government will have to confirm the design of the new tenancy and prepare a Bill to enact this in legislation. The earliest this legislation could be introduced into Parliament is likely Autumn. Although tenancy reform now has cross-party support, there’s the potential for this Bill to take some time to pass, especially given how much Parliamentary time Brexit needs. If the legislation is passed in 2020, it won’t be implemented immediately.

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Government will scrap Section 21 evictions in campaign victory for private renters

The Government will scrap section 21, ending ‘no fault’ evictions in England that have caused misery and hardship for millions of private renters and eroded our communities. This morning's announcement also said insecure fixed-term tenancies will go and a new, open-ended tenancy will be created.

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“Deposit-free” products: definitely not free and less protection for renters.

“Deposit-free” schemes on the market can cost as much as £864 for a two year tenancy in non-refundable costs to tenants, new product analysis and cost comparison by Generation Rent shows. And if the landlord makes a claim for deductions at the end of the tenancy, that figure can rise much higher.

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Policing the letting fees ban - what we're up to

The ban on letting fees is coming – from 1 June, renters in England (including licensees and property guardians as well as tenants) will not have to pay fees for admin, references or inventory to move into a new home. Just the rent and refundable deposits.

This should have a huge impact – not only on renters’ finances, but on their relationship with the landlord and agent too. If the landlord isn’t fixing something or is asking for a higher rent, the tenant is in a stronger negotiating position because it is now cheaper for them to move out instead. Faced with the prospect of a tenantless property, the landlord is more likely to capitulate.

But letting agents are a crafty bunch – their ability to invent fees out of thin air is why we’ve got to this point. And many are willing to break the law – our research on lettingfees.co.uk found that 12% of agents weren’t publishing their fees, in breach of the Consumer Rights Act 2015.

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Older renters struggling with affordability, insecurity, and lack of agency

The demographics of renters has changed so much over the last decade that we could now pluralise our name to Generations Rent. We’re very much conscious of the trend of older people privately renting, which will continue for the foreseeable future, so we were pleased to be invited to speak at Age UK’s All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on ageing and older people which is holding an inquiry into older people’s housing. This session focused specifically on older tenants in the private rented sector and how housing impacts their physical, mental and social wellbeing. 

Generation Rent’s 2019 survey of private renters has just closed, so we crunched the responses and pulled out some findings specifically relating to older renters to share at the event. We received over a thousand survey responses in total, and 32% of responses were from tenants aged 55 or older, with 17.5% aged 65 or over.

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Scotland's rental reforms: what can other nations learn?

In December 2017, Scotland introduced the open-ended Private Residential Tenancy (PRT) and powers for councils to introduce Rent Pressure Zones (RPZs) to protect tenants from rising rents.

As we await the Westminster government’s announcement on security of tenure for private renters in England, this is a good moment to look back at the Scottish tenancy reforms and consider what’s worked well, what’s not so good, and where next for the Scottish private renter movement.

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Private renters denied protection from revenge eviction

Dangerous, broken stairs, or mouldy walls making your family ill? What do you do if the landlord won’t make sure your home is safe? Private renters can contact their council, who have a responsibility to enforce housing safety standards. The council should investigate complaints and if they find a serious hazard, take enforcement action against the landlord, which triggers protection against revenge eviction for the tenant.

But new analysis by Generation Rent shows that just one in every 20 renters who complains to the council about poor conditions gets protection from a revenge eviction. Even when a severe hazard is found, tenants only get protection from eviction in 1 in every 5 cases.

Read more

Britain’s biggest landlords have decided to cash-in their portfolio. But not without evicting hundreds of families from their homes.

Fergus and Judith Wilson own over 700 properties. They are among Britain’s biggest private landlords, owning entire streets in some parts of Kent. Ever since their decision, in 2014, to evict all tenants on housing benefits - even those who had never been in arrears on their rent - their names have been synonymous with controversy.

Now, the Wilsons have decided to cash in on their estimated £250m property portfolio, to settle down and “take life easy”. They reckon that it’s  easier and more profitable for landlords to sell properties without tenants in-situ. So the Wilson’s have started the process of evicting their tenants in preparation for the sale.

Almost all the couples’ properties are two or three bedroom new builds, and many are home to young families. By law, the Wilsons only have to give the tenants two months’ notice of eviction. Some might manage to find new homes in this time. But many landlords are notoriously unwilling to offer tenancies to families on low incomes, meaning the most vulnerable will struggle. The chances of so many people finding suitable new homes are slim. Still less, homes nearby their employers, schools and support networks. Many must fear homelessness, and could be forced to turn to an already stretched council for support.

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