GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2018-06-21 13:54:43 +0100
    The thing is that even three months notice is still very stressful and an extra month won t be time to save when you re paying up to £1000 per month and then have to pay anything up to another £1000 or more in Letting Agent fees to find somewhere else to live. The problem is much much more complicated than that. The whole system needs to be looked at, more secure tenancies are needed, with maybe an arbitrary body in place when it comes to regaining possession. It’s so difficult to just find somewhere else to live if you re on a limited income, that’s why it’s so stressful when a section 21 is served. For a single person, or a retired person on a fixed income or indeed anyone, there is simply nowhere to go! In addition prospective tenants have to undergo an affordability check to see if they can afford the rent. Either the minimum wage needs to be increased or rents need to come down or be capped so that instead of only people s wages being looked at, rents should also be more in line with what people can afford. And all of that is not even taking into account the shambles that is universal credit where you simply don t receive any money for at least 8 weeks. Because of this Landlords won t take people in receipt of benefits. If wages and the cost of living were more aligned with each other there would be a greatly reduced need to claim help.
  • commented 2018-06-21 13:35:56 +0100
    I think two things need to happen with Section 21 – the most obvious is that the notice should be at least 3 months – to the end of the calendar month, which gives renters a bigger chance to save up – and more time to find somewhere to live. Secondly, councils should be encouraging more private landlord schemes, whereby they cover repairs and maintenance, as well as find the tenants, encouraging both a hands’ off approach and a better service for tenants.
  • commented 2018-05-23 07:37:43 +0100
    Will McCallister
    A tenant can be removed quickly,how quick?
    It can take several months,then there’s the additional cost for repairs.it costs thousands.
    For every bad landlord there are 5 bad tenants.
    All I’m asking is for fairness and incentives for good landlords and tenants.
    A register or all
    If this means longer tenancies and rent controls,that’s fine by me,
    But:
    Section 24 is making thiings worse,rent rises and evictions will continue.
    The policy will really kick in by 2020/21,then the s,,,t will hit the fan.
    If ever there were an incentive for the landlord ,remove it.
    But I doubt they will,so all will run for the hills.
    Over to the councils to rehouse.
    Good luck
  • commented 2018-05-22 22:32:29 +0100
    Kevin Dray

    I don’t follow where you are getting from my comment that I am saying 1 is a greater number than 5.

    But you’re missing the point, it’s not about how fantastic some landlords are, or about how terrible some tenants are, or whether good landlords are something that is needed. I’m just trying to point out that in the landlord-tenant relationship, tenants currently seem to have most to lose and least protection. The fact that some landlords aren’t good landlords is good justification to increase those protections.

    From the landlord’s perspective, a bad tenant, who doesn’t pay rent and who damages the property can be evicted quite quickly. Insurance pays for the repairs, and I’ve seen many letting agents even advertise that they will cover the rent if the tenants disappear. The landlord may still have out of pocket costs for some things and see their premiums rise but at the end of the day all it is is a bit of a headache and a lost opportunity for some extra income.

    From the tenant’s perspective, a bad landlord can evict them with two month’s notice at any time for no reason at all. Two months may seem like a lot of notice but you try continuing without impacting on work/studies/looking after your family when you’ve suddenly got two months to find somewhere else to live and move. There’s no guarantee you can find somewhere within budget within reasonable commuting distance from work or from your kid’s school so you may have to find a new job or move your kid to a different school. Then there are the costs associated with moving, you have to fork out for letting agents fees yet again, pay another deposit, pay a removal company, have mail redirected etc.

    This is all if a landlord is a bit on the cruel side but still stays within the law, however tenants can be put under pressure by a bad landlord to do things the law doesn’t require of them, such as to move out even sooner than the two month notice period. I’ve known of landlords threatening to withhold the deposit (a spurious reason to withhold it can always be found) or to give a bad reference, making it difficult for the tenant to find somewhere else to live, and thus forcing the tenant to do as they wish.

    None of this necessarily applies to you, but as things stand it’s very much luck of draw as to what kind of landlord you get and it isn’t unreasonable to ask the government to do more to ensure tenants have adequate protection, but you seem to be taking that desire as an affront to your own honour, like the fact you are a good landlord should mean you don’t require governmental oversight.
  • commented 2018-05-22 17:20:12 +0100
    David Morton
    So its Ok for a Limited Company to offset interest costs on borrowing as an expense,but not a Private landlord ?
    Change the goal posts for one,but not the other.
    Very Unfair,but good for the governments corporate chums.
    When PL are eventually forced out and they have control
    Boy,will you see increases!
  • commented 2018-05-22 16:13:54 +0100
    Dear Kevin Dray , whilst I have sympathy with someone who is a good private landlord the truth is the system has been rigged for so long in favour of those who have pursued Buy to let interest only and the small landlord business / investment model and against people at the bottom of society that something has to give. I run a pub and have found from 2000 onwards getting finance for business investment was and continues to be very difficult when returns on BTL and property are guaranteed by the system as long as you have money you can get money and property continues to hoover up the majority of finance. How many BTL landlords are sitting on properties that they could not possibly have bought without the constant ladder of rising house prices and interest only loans ? . Its a giant Ponzi scheme . When investment in property , land and money is more valuable than investment in people energy and enterprise we are on the road to hell. People at the bottom are propping up the profit, living standards and future pensions of people like yourself although I realise you have only played the game by the rules in place . However those rules need to change . Its grossly unfair and economically illiterate. The only thing I would say is if we collapse all the private landlords as well , banks will fail again and that will again serve no-one. We are all stuck in a bind . The only lifeboat available is the slow but sure increase in social housing with affordable rent controls and the slow but sure removal of BTL and interest only as a means of making profit . My only coda to that is people like yourself need to be given time to change direction but we cannot continue as we are . There needs to be rent control , land and wealth taxes introduced , legislation against land banking and a shift towards the kind of society that invest in its people not bricks and money.

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Blog

Labour signs up to #endsection21

We kind of knew this already, but Labour is officially backing our campaign to end Section 21 and will scrap landlords' ability to evict tenants without giving a reason. It was reported by the BBC this morning, was part of the shadow Housing Secretary John Healey's speech in the conference centre, and then a motion on housing that included it was passed.

This follows members of the End Unfair Evictions doing a lot of work behind the scenes to successfully get local Labour parties to support the motion.

An even bigger piece of news was a £20m pot to jumpstart tenants' unions in the UK, reported by the Independent

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Before you rent: How to protect your legal rights

Finding a flat to rent in England can be tough. The stress only compounds when things don’t go as planned. When I lived in London, I got caught out when my landlord insisted on “renegotiating” the tenancy terms after I had paid a holding deposit (a troublingly common practice in the market).

Here are twelve things tenants can do to protect their rights, which helped me succeed in my legal claim against my landlord.

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Cabinet split over tenancy reform

On Wednesday, the Sun reported that 10 Downing Street and the Treasury are blocking moves to legislate for longer tenancies.

Although the recently closed consultation left open the question of making the new tenancy mandatory or voluntary, the same newspaper had previously reported that the Housing Secretary, James Brokenshire, wanted all tenants to get it.

That sets up a big internal government battle over tenants' rights as the Conservative Party worries more and more about winning over younger voters. 

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Public backs better security for renters

As the consultation period on the government's proposals for longer tenancies draws to a close - the deadline to respond is this Sunday - we are handing in our End Unfair Evictions petition to the Ministry of Housing today. It passed 50,000 signatures on Tuesday, helped along by #VentYourRent.

And if that wasn't enough to make the government pay attention, new polling from Survation finds that our demands have the backing of the wider public, including Conservative voters.

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No-fault evictions drive up homelessness

Section 21 is the leading cause of statutory homelessness. This law allows evictions with no reason needed, and this is one more reason why we should scrap it.

To some extent, this is stating the bleeding obvious. Since 2012, the end of a private tenancy has been the leading cause of homelessness cases accepted by local authorities, but until now no one has specifically pointed the finger at Section 21. Today, we've been able to demonstrate it.

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Source: Ministry of Housing

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Proof that millions of renters are failed by unfair rental laws

The latest English Housing Survey was out last week, and the results are further evidence for what we’ve been arguing for years: England’s rental laws are making life insecure and expensive for growing numbers of people.  

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Four early victories for the End Unfair Evictions campaign

It is less than a month since we launched our joint campaign - with ACORN, the New Economics Foundation and the London Renters Union - to end section 21 no-fault evictions, and we've already had some major successes. 

Here are four things we can celebrate already.

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A victory on tenant security, but the campaign continues

After reports in the Sunday papers, late yesterday afternoon the Ministry of Housing published its long-awaited consultation paper on "Overcoming Barriers to Longer Tenancies in the Private Rented Sector".

It allows us a moment to celebrate the first success of the End Unfair Evictions campaign: an acceptance by the government that private tenancy law is failing England's tenants - just as our petition passes 40,000 signatures

Leaving the detail of the policy to one side for now, it is significantly the first time the government has considered a change to tenancy law. Up to now ministers have been talking of merely "encouraging" landlords to offer better terms - while most landlords might do this, a lot of tenants would get no benefit. We have been arguing that we need full reform and, while incentives are still an option, mandatory reform is now on the table.

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Protection from revenge evictions a postcode lottery

This week we launched the End Unfair Evictions coalition with ACORNLondon Renters Union, and New Economics Foundation. We're calling for an end to Section 21, which allows landlords to evict tenants without needing a reason. 

One reason we're doing is that existing protections are not working in practice.

Back in 2014/15, we fought a hard campaign alongside Shelter, GMB Young London and others to give tenants basic protection from eviction when they complained about their landlord. 

The resulting measures in the Deregulation Act 2015 stopped landlords from serving a Section 21 eviction notice to tenants if the council had found hazards in the property and served an appropriate improvement notice on the owner. This protection lasted for 6 months and was meant to give tenants more confidence in getting their landlord to fix health and safety problems, because the landlord can no longer simply retaliate by kicking them out.

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New mayoral strategy develops plans for London's private renters

Two million tenants in London will welcome the fact that getting a fairer deal for private renters is one of the Mayor of London’s five priorities for housing in the London Housing Strategy, which was published at the end of May. Given that Sadiq Khan’s housing powers are highly limited, what is his strategy promising to private renters in London?

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