GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:49:02 +0000
    It’s pretty simple, James, if you take a view without any personal gain issues. Rental properties are essential for the reason you suggest and many more. But they should be owned and managed by a non-profit making entity who puts ALL profits into building further housing, thus keeping the building trade going. Let’s call them the local council, but housing associations, charities, universities and governmental organisations will also fit, along with many other suchorganisations. I appreciate that you and other private landlords say that Councils etc. are poor in some respects. I’m not arguing with this, but there are also very poor private landlords, I’m sure you’ll agree. There should be an empowered regulatory body, with teeth, in place to ensure that all landlords play fair.That’ll take time to set up, sure, but it will be FAIR and all profits will then go to improving the housing situation countrywide, not lining private individuals’ pockets/retirement plans. (Contact Messrs. G. Brown and T. Blair if you have issues with pension plan performance – I notice the Blair property portfolio is coming along nicely).

    As to buy to let landlords buying all new builds, I’ve seen it with my own eyes. As an example, there is another new development going up in my area now. I registered an interest as a potential buyer, and asked the developer whether there would be any for owner occupiers, or if they were going to the buy to let market. They told me they expected most/all to go to private landlords. This is not the first time that’s happened, and in many different areas. Most potential first time buyers would be only too happy to wait as long as it took to get their own bricks and mortar. If developers were not allowed to sell off plan (another argument for a different forum), predatory landlords would not have the time to wait, especially as many of them need to regularly increase their debt to service their empires. So you own argument in that field defeats you.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:43:05 +0000
    And if you still think the Chancellor is your friend and isn’t just trying to get the coffers full then read this http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/feb/06/pay-stay-rules-families-council-homes-private-sector-rent/. \What do you think rents will do in the PRS as these people will be forced from their homes.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:39:09 +0000
    No FW you are not offering a solution. There are an increasing number of immigrants in this country, do you comprehend that? They cannot buy houses so where would you have them live? The issue is not all about you and what you want. It’s about housing 65 million people when we have no proper building plan. So you want BTL to end, what’s the solution to housing all these people please? You might argue that there should be more social housing and I’d agree with you but there isn’t! And social housing building has been in decline since the 80s. Is that wrong? Yes I think it is but that’s where we are with things. Councils have been pushing their housing responsibilities out to the private sector more and more, as indeed they have with so many other services.

    You’ve been offered statistics and proposals but all you do is insult, which is why I think you deserve some of it back.

    Your ‘solution’ is to stop BTL overnight but that is a solution that in your own mind is going to help you, not anyone else. It’s all about me, me, me in your book. So come on then, where is your solution to housing all the immigrants and where is your solution for building more houses? You certainly haven’t offered one so far. And if you remove private investment from the industry then things just get worse, though probably not in the Utopian land you’ve dreamed up.

    You come out with more rubbish about Rachman but you know nothing about the accommodation I offer. Your narrow minded approach is indicative of ignorance, which of course you displayed much earlier when you went on about ‘guaranteed mortgages’ which only exist in your head.

    In the same earlier posts you admitted to distorting facts about numbers of viewers on a property being disproportionate of FTB to landlords, but then later said you were only talking about one particular day.

    You keep on about me being worried about my income and cash cow drying up. Well my old son you couldn’t be further from the truth. Like I have repeatedly told you I have always kept my rents low but now your super hero is forcing me to put them up, so the tenants are going to pay George what he wants and that was part of his plan anyway. Indeed I see great buying opportunities ahead.

    The headline grabbers of 500,000 properties being sold are I think, greatly exaggerated but we’ll see. Mark Carney (in case you don’t know who he is, he’s the Governor of the Bank of England) has states all along that that is one of his biggest concerns, and now George is trying to make it happen. If it does happen and prices tumble you can watch the building industry shut down,which will have a knock-on effect for generations. The country is already teetering on another recession and that could be the tipping point. I wonder if you’ll have a job then FW, even if you do manage to keep one, lenders probably won’t want to give you a mortgage.

    So my friend there is no desperation from where I stand but I completely believe that the tax grab is going to hurt millions of tenants and it’ll be the ones that are the poorest that will be hurt the most. Still you’re probably living with Mummy and Daddy and sponging of them so you’ll be alright.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:35:24 +0000
    I can’t believe the nonsense I read from landlords with vested interests on this site. The fact is that private landlords are greedy parasites who try to con us into believing they have the best interests of the poor at heart. They have been able to thrive in this so-called society of ours simply because this is the kind of behaviour that has been rewarded by governments that have not fulfilled their promises to provide housing that people can afford to buy.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:22:46 +0000
    Oh Foxwatcher! You lot on the anti-landlord bandwagon need to get your ducks in a row. Answer me these two simple questions. 1. I need to move for a job. I don’t want to buy even though I can. In your world, who is going to provide my housing? If I – say – needed a house in Manchester next month, who is going to provide it? You? The council? Do tell me. 2. Please explain your belief that landlords buy all the new builds, especially when (i) FTBs/OOs are free to buy them but generally choose not to wait the many months of completion time and (ii) on most other anti-landlord sites we’re always told we contribute nothing to the economy?? Please explain how we are the ones keeping housebuilders building (your view) whilst simultaneously not providing financial gain to everyone else (everyone else’s view) – including your own pension pot which invests heavily in builders, banks, lenders, materials companies, labour suppliers and land.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:00:45 +0000
    Two other point, James. You say I don’t present solutions, but that’s what I AM doing by arguing that private buy to let should be abolished as part of the solution. And you say that I think the world owes me a living. Wrong. I work for my living, and value what I provide for myself. I don’t over reach myself, or build a lifestyle or potential retirement on taking money from others less fortunate than myself. Think about it.

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Blog

Mayor of London backs indefinite tenancies

At the Labour party conference this week, delegates adopted a motion to (among other things) "Help private renters with an end to ‘no fault’ evictions, controls on rents and new minimum standards, including three year tenancies as standard." 

The BBC reported on this commitment, but beyond the wording of this motion and John Healey's speech, we haven't had any more detail of what this would entail. 

Luckily, Sadiq Khan has obliged. While the Mayor of London is not a member of the Shadow Cabinet, last week's publication of his response to the government's consultation on longer tenancies revealed that he is calling for much the same thing, plus some more idea of what it might look like in practice.

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Labour signs up to #endsection21

We kind of knew this already, but Labour is officially backing our campaign to end Section 21 and will scrap landlords' ability to evict tenants without giving a reason. It was reported by the BBC this morning, was part of the shadow Housing Secretary John Healey's speech in the conference centre, and then a motion on housing that included it was passed.

This follows members of the End Unfair Evictions doing a lot of work behind the scenes to successfully get local Labour parties to support the motion.

An even bigger piece of news was a £20m pot to jumpstart tenants' unions in the UK, reported by the Independent

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Before you rent: How to protect your legal rights

Finding a flat to rent in England can be tough. The stress only compounds when things don’t go as planned. When I lived in London, I got caught out when my landlord insisted on “renegotiating” the tenancy terms after I had paid a holding deposit (a troublingly common practice in the market).

Here are twelve things tenants can do to protect their rights, which helped me succeed in my legal claim against my landlord.

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Cabinet split over tenancy reform

On Wednesday, the Sun reported that 10 Downing Street and the Treasury are blocking moves to legislate for longer tenancies.

Although the recently closed consultation left open the question of making the new tenancy mandatory or voluntary, the same newspaper had previously reported that the Housing Secretary, James Brokenshire, wanted all tenants to get it.

That sets up a big internal government battle over tenants' rights as the Conservative Party worries more and more about winning over younger voters. 

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Public backs better security for renters

As the consultation period on the government's proposals for longer tenancies draws to a close - the deadline to respond is this Sunday - we are handing in our End Unfair Evictions petition to the Ministry of Housing today. It passed 50,000 signatures on Tuesday, helped along by #VentYourRent.

And if that wasn't enough to make the government pay attention, new polling from Survation finds that our demands have the backing of the wider public, including Conservative voters.

Survation_2018.png

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No-fault evictions drive up homelessness

Section 21 is the leading cause of statutory homelessness. This law allows evictions with no reason needed, and this is one more reason why we should scrap it.

To some extent, this is stating the bleeding obvious. Since 2012, the end of a private tenancy has been the leading cause of homelessness cases accepted by local authorities, but until now no one has specifically pointed the finger at Section 21. Today, we've been able to demonstrate it.

Homelessness.png

Source: Ministry of Housing

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Proof that millions of renters are failed by unfair rental laws

The latest English Housing Survey was out last week, and the results are further evidence for what we’ve been arguing for years: England’s rental laws are making life insecure and expensive for growing numbers of people.  

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Four early victories for the End Unfair Evictions campaign

It is less than a month since we launched our joint campaign - with ACORN, the New Economics Foundation and the London Renters Union - to end section 21 no-fault evictions, and we've already had some major successes. 

Here are four things we can celebrate already.

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A victory on tenant security, but the campaign continues

After reports in the Sunday papers, late yesterday afternoon the Ministry of Housing published its long-awaited consultation paper on "Overcoming Barriers to Longer Tenancies in the Private Rented Sector".

It allows us a moment to celebrate the first success of the End Unfair Evictions campaign: an acceptance by the government that private tenancy law is failing England's tenants - just as our petition passes 40,000 signatures

Leaving the detail of the policy to one side for now, it is significantly the first time the government has considered a change to tenancy law. Up to now ministers have been talking of merely "encouraging" landlords to offer better terms - while most landlords might do this, a lot of tenants would get no benefit. We have been arguing that we need full reform and, while incentives are still an option, mandatory reform is now on the table.

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Protection from revenge evictions a postcode lottery

This week we launched the End Unfair Evictions coalition with ACORNLondon Renters Union, and New Economics Foundation. We're calling for an end to Section 21, which allows landlords to evict tenants without needing a reason. 

One reason we're doing is that existing protections are not working in practice.

Back in 2014/15, we fought a hard campaign alongside Shelter, GMB Young London and others to give tenants basic protection from eviction when they complained about their landlord. 

The resulting measures in the Deregulation Act 2015 stopped landlords from serving a Section 21 eviction notice to tenants if the council had found hazards in the property and served an appropriate improvement notice on the owner. This protection lasted for 6 months and was meant to give tenants more confidence in getting their landlord to fix health and safety problems, because the landlord can no longer simply retaliate by kicking them out.

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