GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngProvide opportunities for private renters to campaign on issues that affect them and their local areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-06 18:58:25 +0100
    As Stephen Tunney said Foxwatcher, you crave for Utopia. However I agree that social housing should be provided by the State, but alas it isn’t. The State haven’t put any real effort into building for the last 30 years so where would you have all these men, women and children live??? I only have one HB tenant and she’s not my best by any means, but it seems you’ll be pleased to know that she’ll be the first to go, along with her children. Gosh that must make you happy! As for taking homes from first time buyers there has been no study of this done by anyone so prove what you say has any real value. Certainly I have purchased no houses a FTB would want as they’re all too large and some were on the market for literally years. I bought when others would not and I’ve made properties fit for habitation again. Instead of jealousy clouding your judgement actually talk with real-life landlords that have given people somewhere to live that would otherwise have none and on low rents too. Now the days of low rents will go. Also you bang on about us owning houses that the State should own. Let’s go the whole hog then, let’s have the State own our food shops too, after all it’s another basic human need. Let’s have them own M&S, TopShop and all the other clothes retailers as well as clothes are another basic human need. Let’s build that Utopia Foxwatcher! Let’s join George O as the builders of the nation! Oh sorry, this is the real world isn’t it.
  • commented 2015-10-06 17:49:58 +0100
    Private landlords need to think of someone other than themselves and their fat bank accounts. There is indeed a place for rental accommodation for many good reasons. But these should be owned by properly regulated Housing Associations, local councils, universities or similar responsible organisations, so that profits, both from rental income and from capital appreciation are used for the good of these organisations. They should not be owned by private individuals getting tax breaks on mortgage interest, repairs, profits and all the rest, borrowing obscene amounts of money with little or no checks such as those now faced by owner occupiers and buying up all the cheaper properties which would otherwise be targets for first time owner occupier buyers. Because of this, those who desperately want to buy but cannot because of you parasites, have to rent, as well as those who choose to do so for perfectly valid reasons. This is not about good or bad landlords, it’s about removing the aspiration to buy from a whole generation who want to do so. Do you have consciences?
  • commented 2015-10-06 15:06:19 +0100
    Well said James Roberts. Generation Rent and particularly Foxwatcher seem to live a utopian pink cloud. Fact: Without the PRS many tenants would be homeless. Fact: Housing Associations and Councils account for over 50% of all evictions through the Courts be it S21 or for rent arrears . Fact: The majority of PRS landlords want to keep their tenants for as long as possible and often do not raise rent for many years, unlike the whole of the Social sector who apply rent increases year on year. Fact: There is only a minority of ‘Rogue’ landlords (less than 5% of the whole market) who do not abide by the rules and never will. Fact: There are as many if not more bad tenants than there are bad landlords. Fact: Deposit disputes which go to arbitration with any of the schemes account for less than 1% of all the deposits held, and finally: if you believe rent controls will help to improve the standard of housing then you are deluded.
  • commented 2015-10-06 14:44:56 +0100
    Foxwatcher hasn’t got a clue. They presumably style themselves as fair and intelligent but claim tax rates in excess of total earnings are ‘fair and appropriate’ then fails to spot the irony in landlords selling properties and evicting tenants who would otherwise have a long-term home. What a turnip. You should know that no professional landlords want to do this, and that many professional working tenants do not WANT to buy their own home. How do you account for that, you genius?
  • commented 2015-10-06 14:38:27 +0100
    Ha! Generation Rent are a joke. They’ve single-handedly forced the eviction and extreme rent rises of thousands, possibly hundreds of thousands, of tenants. I am now in the process of evicting 21 families who have had secure homes at low rents (25% below market value, so I certainly CAN raise rents!) for many years in fully refurbished properties. Have you never thought what will happen to those people if landlords are forcibly bankrupted? The PRS where I am has got queues out of the door, I already operate waiting lists and there are many more people asking for one of my houses. But thanks to you I can no longer provide such good value housing. I shall be sure to point out to all of my tenants the government’s new 100+% tax demands and GR’s guiding hand in that. You really couldn’t make this up – the so-called defenders of tenants forcing misery on the very people they claim to support! What berks!
  • commented 2015-10-06 14:22:24 +0100
    I have no sympathy for landlords who will have financial issues once fair and appropriate taxation is applied. Why on earth should greedy speculators buy properties at more advantageous terms than those who want to buy their own property to live in? That’s more important than having a property portfolio. I hope they all have to sell to private owner occupiers at a loss.

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Blog

Planned shake-up of rental market complaints system

Last October, Sajid Javid, the Secretary of State for Communities (and now Housing) said that he wanted to start requiring landlords to join a redress scheme if they did not already use a letting agent. 

The government is now consulting on plans for this. The good news is it is considering doing away with the three different schemes tenants have to navigate when they have a complaint at the moment.

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Rented London: How local authorities can support private renters

Local council elections are taking place in London in a few months. And just like the 2016 Mayoral race, these contests will be dominated by the city's housing crisis. From Haringey to Kensington and Chelsea, Londoners are looking for secure and affordable homes, and asking their councils to respond.

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First-time buyers taking out longer loans to escape the rental sector

The latest English Housing Survey report is out today with the highlights of their findings for 2016-17. 

The private rented sector has continued to grow. The population now stands at 4.7m households, with 27% of families renting from a private landlord.

It is once again the largest tenure in London (if you separate outright and mortgaged ownership), and its doubling outside the capital in the past decade illustrates the national impact the housing crisis has had.

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Homes fit for humans one step closer

Third time was the charm for efforts to revive the right of renters to sue their landlord for safety failures.

Karen Buck's Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation) Bill was talked out in 2015, then a Labour amendment to the Housing Bill in 2016 was defeated. But today, after winning the support of more than 100 MPs who attended the Second Reading debate, the Bill passed unanimously and is a step closer to being law. 

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Fitness for Human Habitation: Another milestone in the long road to a decent private rented sector

In another sign of the growing importance of the renters' movement in the UK, government announced over the weekend that it would be supporting measured outlined in Karen Buck MP's upcoming private member's bill, which would allow private and social tenants to take legal action against their landlord where their home is not deemed 'fit for human habitation'.

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The return of 'fitness for human habitation' - will MPs finally give us this protection?

In ten days time, parliament breaks for the Christmas recess.

When they return in January, they will have an opportunity to support a simple change in law that would provide better protections for renters.

The question is, given that they have missed this opportunity before - will parliament do the right thing this time?

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Getting the best from Newham's renewed landlord licensing scheme

This week those campaigning for a better private rented sector received an early Christmas present with the announcement that the Communities Secretary had approved the majority of Newham's proposal for a renewed borough-wide landlord licensing scheme.

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Autumn Budget - an anticlimax for renters

The big news in today's Budget was the abolition of stamp duty for most first-time buyers. 

From today if you buy your first home you'll pay nothing to the government on the first £300,000 (unless it costs more than £500,000 and you need to be super-rich before you're in that territory).

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Life in the rental market: what the future holds for older renters

Most debates around housing focus on young adults, the drastic fall in their rate of home ownership and ways to boost the number of first time buyers.

Far less attention, however, is given to the vast numbers of renters who are already too old to get a mortgage and face a lifetime of renting instead. As more of them reach retirement age, the state will start paying more of their rent, and faces enormous costs unless it makes some fundamental changes to the housing market. Because politicians only operate with 5-year horizons, few are fretting about the implications of lifetime renting.

But we are, and today we publish a report co-authored with David Adler of Oxford University: Life in the Rental Market.

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A glimpse of Tory tenancy reform?

An intriguing exchange in the House of Commons this week may contain clues about the government's big forthcoming announcement of reforms to tenancies. 

During a debate on temporary accommodation, the backbench Conservative MP Bob Blackman said this:

The greatest cause of homelessness is the end of an assured shorthold tenancy. They usually run for six months and at the end of that period families often have to move. The solution is clear: we need longer tenancies and more security of tenure for families, but also assurances to landlords that they will get paid their rent and that the tenants will behave themselves in accordance with the contract they have signed. I ask the Minister to update us on where we are going with lengthening tenancies, which would dramatically reduce homelessness at a stroke. Perhaps we can do that.

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