GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2014-08-07 09:05:08 +0100
    Regarding Alan Duncan’s response to Paul Taylor’s comment about rent controls; on Islington Private Tenants meeting in September 2013, several Politicians and retired working professionals ( I.e they where active before 1988) attended , spoke and emphasised that there was no shortage of rentals at the time. Smaller population and easier lending may have contributed to that, but I believe that Duncan’s answer is a ’ cop out’ to rent controls. The entire chain involved in building, developing , letting etc of course has to be under controls; for example, a decent owners of a block may not actually be that greedy and need to charge a certain amount of rent in order to cover mortgage,insurance, repairs etc and rent controls may mean him/her/him-&-her needing to sell. On the other hand there are monsters such as the Landlord recently on the news, who has monopolised Caledonian Rd and ruined parts of its community. In his case, VERY right controls is the answer. I welcome discussions. Ms C
  • commented 2014-07-15 17:54:20 +0100
    Here is Alan Duncan’s reply to my email [Private Rented Sector debate, Weds 25th June]:

    Dear Mr Taylor
    Thank you for contacting me about the rent controls.

    While I am aware that the Opposition has been actively advocating rent controls, I know that the Government has no plans to re-introduce them. Rent controls would cut investment and mean less accommodation available for new tenants to rent, ultimately forcing up rents. I do not agree with proposals which would increase rents, especially at a time when people are struggling with the cost of living.

    Previously, rent controls decimated the private rented sector. Between the introduction of the 1939 Rent and Mortgage Interest Restrictions Act, and the abolition of rent controls at the end of the 1980s, the private rented sector from 55 per cent of households to just 8 per cent. Of course other factors can account for some of this fall, but rental controls were a significant factor. Rent controls meant that many landlords could not afford to improve or maintain their homes, leading to worse conditions for tenants.

    The interests of tenants are best served by avoiding excessive regulation which would ultimately force up rents and reduce supply and choice.

    Thank you again for taking the time to contact me.

    Yours sincerely

    Alan Duncan
  • @maddiezahatter tweeted link to this page. 2014-07-05 14:13:12 +0100
    Join Generation Rent to improve renting for all in the UK. http://www.generationrent.org/?recruiter_id=6018

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Blog

Sadiq says his plans are "ambitious but realistic"

This week will mark 50 days since Sadiq Khan was elected Mayor of London in an election that was defined by the capital’s housing crisis. Yet since that point private renters (and indeed all Londoners hit by its failed housing system) have had to wait patiently to hear the detail within the Mayor’s commitments.

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Lords debate letting fees ban

When we published our latest research on letting fees in April, we were expecting a long fight to get the issue of banning them back on the political agenda. The Housing and Planning Act, passed in May, contained no changes to the law on fees, and the only area of housing government is currently legislating on concerns planning. 

We didn't have to wait for long though. Olly Grender, a Lib Dem peer, who fought for and won some protections for renters in the Housing Act, was selected to present a private member's Bill. Happily for us, she picked fees.

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#ventyourrent: a round-up

On 26th April, we launched a social media campaign called #ventyourrent on Twitter and Tumblr. We asked people to tell us on cardboard, a photo, or just a tweet, what they were paying in rent and what it bought them.

The plan was to get Londoners sharing their worst experiences of renting and generating some solidarity ahead of the Mayoral Election on 5th May. We hoped that seeing the posts would get people thinking about the housing market as a political issue that they could have some influence on. If they did, we had a handy guide for them.

It was the first campaign of its kind that we have attempted and we could not have done it without the energy of a crack team of volunteers*, the guidance of Paolo Gerbaudo of Kings College London, and the inspiration of Pierre-Emmanuel Lemaire, Yasmina Aoun, Cong Bi and Nicola Lotter of Central St Martin's MA Communication Design course.

It was a huge success, generating our biggest media story to date, attracting hundreds of submissions, and surely contributing at least a tiny bit to the highest ever turnout for a London Mayoral Election. 

Now that the dust has settled, we decided to find out what #ventyourrent taught us.

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The new Mayor's in-tray

London has a new Mayor. Sadiq Khan was elected last Thursday with 1.3m votes, the largest personal mandate for any British politician in history. That gives him a lot of clout in implementing his manifesto, whether that's dealing with local councils or the Westminster government. 

Let's remind ourselves what he promised. On our Vote Homes comparison site, Sadiq came in behind the Green Party candidate Sian Berry with more amber policies (ones we felt were okay) than greens (policies we called for). And while he had fewer greens than the Lib Dem, Caroline Pidgeon, he had no policies we thought were terrible (marked red) to Caroline's two (on security and rent levels).

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Finally, Zac and Sadiq go head-to-head on housing

After months of debate and campaigning, the London Mayoral election is imminent. Despite housing being the absolute number one issue of the election, the two frontrunners have not managed to face each other to debate it.

There have been general hustings between Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith, including the Evening Standard and Centre for London debate on 21 April, where, amid heated exchanges on policing, transport and extremism, the only real look-in that housing had simply highlighted the similarities between the candidates: building ambitions, first dibs for Londoners, and refusal to build on the green belt (despite Zac’s desire to paint Sadiq as a park concreter).

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UKIP's answer to London's housing crisis

The final manifesto we're looking at for Vote Homes is UKIP's Peter Whittle's. Like all the other candidates, Peter recognises that housing is the biggest challenge facing London. But unlike the other candidates, he sees the cause as excess demand, rather than a shortage of supply.

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What will George Galloway do for London's renters?

The Respect Party candidate, George Galloway, has set out his manifesto on his home page, and we've updated our candidate comparison on Vote Homes. This is what he is promising London’s renters.

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Caroline Pidgeon sets out housing policies

Caroline Pidgeon, Liberal Democrat candidate for London Mayor, has published her manifesto. We’ve taken a look at what she’d do to fix the housing crisis and how she compares with other candidates so far.

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Letting fees - 10 areas now covered

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This morning we have published six more areas on www.lettingfees.co.uk – Manchester, York, and four more London boroughs – Bromley, Camden, Lambeth and Wandsworth.

Flathunters in those areas can check to see which letting agents are charging the least, and which charge the most. These areas join four already in London, and bring the total number of letting agents covered by our website past 700.

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Sian Berry's pitch to London's renters

The Green Party candidate Sian Berry has already promised to establish a Tenants' Union for London. But what else does she have up her sleeve? She recently published her full manifesto and we've now updated her scorecard on www.votehomes2016.com.

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