GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-02-05 20:17:08 +0000
    Currently being asked by letting agency to lose £300 of my deposit to touch up some paint. Completely unreasonable. Obviously trying to get even more cash out of me
  • commented 2015-02-05 09:27:15 +0000
    I am currently being forced to leave my home with my 9 year old child. When I started my tenancy last summer it was advertised as a fully managed property by the estate agents. Less than two weeks after I moved in that changed to a privately managed property. The landlord felt that turning up randomly was fine and was desperate to meet me and have ‘tea’. This made me very uncomfortable. After christmas I discovered that one of my neighbours had made a nasty complaint about me secretly so had an inspection. Landlord was fine about the conditions of both house and garden and my guinea pigs and promised to sort it out. Less than two weeks after this I was told that I was being kicked out due to the same neighbour complaining nonstop. He had been videoing me and my family in the garden and taking pictures of my pets and trespassing to get the footage as well as spying on us at half 11 at night. And I am the one being punished as according to the estate agent I am getting kicked out under section 21 of contract as the landlord cant be bothered dealing with this neighbour even though I found out she had been going to his house slagging me off. My rents paid up until end of May so will have to probably fight for it so I will have money to move on. Landlords have too much power against tenants. Things need tonchange.
  • commented 2015-02-04 17:00:34 +0000
    Private landlords seem to feel they hold some power over their tenants. mine began trying to place more restrictions on me within the property that weren’t stipulated in the contract (use of living spaces/ guests etc) it’s left me feeling insecure and uncomfortable in sonewhere that should be my home. My landlord (who is male) also feels it is appropriate to just pitch up at the property whether I am there or not and gives me no pre warning. I do not feel this is appropriate but also don’t feel I can really say much as he could just kick me out.
  • commented 2015-02-04 10:15:15 +0000
    Ms stanton,I raised the comment regarding discrimination of LEA tenants on this forum last summer. Thank you for reminding the new readers. Yes many are pensioners & others are mature students, working professional on 0-h or hour-contracts or simply people in employment who’s wages doesn’t cover the rent. rent poverty has prevented me from leaving a job that’s making me ill & to do a Masters Degree. As a teacher it would really benefit my career to obtain a Masters & as a subject specialist I would be more suited as a L4 Lecturer. My point with the last comment is that rent slavery & poverty ruins careers& health not just of the renter but also those involved in the renters life.
  • commented 2015-02-04 10:06:09 +0000
    I agree with Ms Morgan and would like to add that I believe that agents make their commission on ’ renewal of contract’, for some that means the tenant sign for another terms, for others, ending the tenancy and most likely evading explainhow the reason for it to both parties. The standard short hold tenancy therefore enable tenants & landlords to eat out of the agents hands.
  • commented 2015-02-04 08:04:57 +0000
    Good interview bu Alex Hilton on breakfast TV just now, talking about Letting Agents charges to tenants. As a landlord I am charged hundreds of pounds per tenant find, and I am not happy that the agents are fleecing my new tenants for a service that I have already paid for in full! However I do think Letting Agents should be able to take a modest refundable deposit from prospective tenants upon receipt of their application forms, to deter time-wasters.

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Blog

The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 1 – rent levels)

During his recent visit to New York City, the Mayor of London took the opportunity to announce one of his key pre-election pledges for the private rented sector, the London Living Rent.

Doing so while overseas was both surprising and interesting and his visit to New York highlighted the challenges facing the Mayors of both cities.

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London's turning - Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor

Today Generation Rent publishes 'London's Turning: Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor', our call on Sadiq Khan to act rapidly and boldly in his response to the capital's housing crisis.

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London's housing costs are driving families away

Today we have called on the Mayor of London to adopt a set of policies that will speed up his efforts to end the capital’s housing crisis.

To remind him what’s at stake, we have uncovered another startling trend that is hurting the city and its people.

Every year the Office for National Statistics releases figures on internal migration – how many people move from one part of the UK to another – and people are moving out of London at an alarming rate.  

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Looking for cheap rent in London? Just become an artist then

Proposals this week to implement cheap rents for London's artists show how the the city's housing crisis makes an absurdity of good intentions, and indicates why a closer link to universality rather than targeting is needed to make renting affordable again in the capital.

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Making overseas investment work for Londoners

The issue of foreign investors pumping money into the London property market has once again been raised by last night’s BBC report on a rise in overseas investment in the outer London boroughs, and how this provides competition for first-time buyers.

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Private renters are Londoners too…

As Sadiq Khan announced the membership of his new Homes for Londoners board last week, the private rented sector was conspicuous by its absence. Despite close to one third of Londoners privately renting, the new body has not yet made provision for either tenants’ voices to be heard, nor for a clear focus on the PRS to be part of HfL’s work.

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Does your MP support a ban on letting fees?

Go straight to the campaign page

We have been banging on about banning letting fees for more than two years now. The case against them keeps getting stronger.

The latest evidence is from the English Housing Survey, which revealed in July that up to 69% of tenants living in unsatisfactory homes are discouraged from moving out because of the cost of agent fees. It also suggests the scam is worth around £115m a year.* 

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The decline of ownership, and meaningless means

A version of this article appeared on Inside Housing.

Last Tuesday, the Resolution Foundation dominated the headlines and airwaves with its report into levels of home ownership. Using figures from the Labour Force Survey, their big finding was that Greater Manchester saw the biggest fall in owner occupation from its peak at the turn of the century. It was a pattern seen across the north.

It’s no shock that the housing crisis is gripping the whole country. Our analysis of the 2011 census in 2014 found that ownership levels were already dropping in major urban areas. These figures are a bit more up to date.

While London and the South East have the most insane house prices, buying a home anywhere has become more difficult. This is because wages haven’t risen by much, and more people are in insecure employment, so it’s harder to save and to qualify for a mortgage. House prices became uncoupled from wages before the credit crunch, and didn’t revert to affordable levels after it.

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New developments in London require a relentless focus on affordability - nothing less will do

For the rest of the summer, London politics is formally in recess. Yet, the city keeps on moving and the Mayor has been publicly engaged with the housing elements of a number of high-profile developments.

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Got opinions about renting? We want them

As part of our work, we want to make sure that we're doing the best we can for renters, and a big part of that is understanding your experiences and hopes for the future. 

The housing crisis is such a complex beast that there are a range of views about how to fix it - and we'd like to know what yours are too.

That's why we are running a survey until mid-August. 

 

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