GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-03-25 23:00:32 +0000
    Just wondering others thoughts on this,

    If the government were to put a levy on earnings accuired through rental incomes (instead of current tax breaks), would this deter landlords from entering the market, therefore creating a wealthier society of tenants and first time buyers.
  • commented 2015-03-18 08:39:24 +0000
    Not everyone wants to be tied into long term tenancy agreements – you can’t see into the future and know what you need in 12 months time. We provide a real home for those who will rent for all or most of their lives and if you pay the rent and are good tenants you can stay as long as you want and we only have an annual rent increase review – however,.

    At Unohomes we allow tenants to give us 1 week’s notice to leave – why do we do this?
    because if you don’t want to stay with us or can’t then it is best you go – we offer affordable housing and charge no fees to tenants – we fill your flat within 24 hours from our waiting list!

    simples!

    unohomes.co.uk – the way forward………………………
  • commented 2015-03-17 21:03:18 +0000
    I’ve lived in a flatshare for nearly two years now. My flatmate is moving out and my letting agency is forcing me to sign a new contract with a minimum term of 1 year. I bear all the risks in this situation and am not given the flexibility I would need in that point of my carrer. I’ve checked and they are legally allowed to do this. It would only be a gesture of goodwill for them to accept to give me a shorter term. But of course they won’t grant it to me, no matter how politely it’s been asked. I don’t think this kind of situation is normal and tenant should not have to sacrifice job and personal opportunities because agency “trap” them in their own flat. I was quite shocked to see this is legally allowed and I have no other option but to accept a unreasonable deal. I hope things will change in the future so other people don’t have to bear the same kind of risk. Thank you for your action in trying to make tenant’s right change for the best :)
  • commented 2015-03-10 08:02:34 +0000
    Is it the Private Rental sector or the Social Housing sector that Generation Rent should be campaigning about. The Social Housing sector issue 5 times more S21’s than the private sector and this article shows that they are more likely to evict vulnerable tenants. At a time when the Private Rental Sector has overtaken the Social Housing sector these figures to not look encouraging.

    Are councils favouring bailiffs in rent arrear cases?
    Warren Lewis
    Warren Lewis
    09 Mar 2015

    According to a think tank, councils have been accused of turning to bailiffs and the courts rather than helping people in rent arrears.

    The Independent has reported that recent research suggests councils are more likely to engage in aggressive enforcement action rather than offer affordable payment options to struggling tenants.

    Mike O’Connor, chief executive of StepChange, said: “It is shocking that many councils are less likely to be helpful to people in debt than banks are, and are more likely to take people to court. The growth in people struggling with their council tax bills is only outstripped by growth in problems caused by payday loans.”

    The number of people contacting the charity with council tax arrears has increased 372% in the last five years and over the same period the average amount owed has risen £157, he said.

    A survey of the charity’s clients found that even when people engaged with their council they faced tough action. After speaking to the council, 62 per cent had still been threatened with court action, 51% had been threatened with bailiffs.

    Meanwhile only 25% were offered an affordable payment option and a measly 13% were encouraged to get debt advice.

    Related Articles

    Tenants feel ripped off at the start of a tenancy
    5 tenants chase every rental property claims new report
    Poor enforcement is letting tenants down, claim landlords
    The charity is calling on the government to change to the Council Tax Administration and Enforcement Act 1992 to place guidance on a stronger legal footing, including ensuring that councils should evidence that they have tried to pursue an affordable repayment plan

    Ensure consistent incentives and messages to councils that reinforce the need for and importance of affordable payment solutions.

    It has also demanded a new individual protection against enforcement of unaffordable repayments for people seeking help with their debts.

    Mr O’Connor added: “Councils need to pursue debts but they must have a responsible and proportionate approach to dealing with people in arrears and not default to aggressive enforcement that often only serves to deepen debt problems. There are examples of good practice such as Leeds City Council but all too often public authorities are neither behaving as responsibly as they should or using the best strategy to recover debt.”
  • commented 2015-03-05 19:24:59 +0000
    AS Green Party Candidate for the Rochdale constituency, I can say that I fully support your aims, and wish you all the very best. If elected, I will do my very best to support your aims, in parliament and elsewhere. I fully support the Green Party’s pledge to build a lot more social housing too.
  • commented 2015-02-28 19:07:18 +0000
    I am no idiot ie literate numerate and decent it skills but i struggle with on line systems set up for local housing association bidding its just stupid.
    More power to you hope u can get something out of the people like joseph rowntree foundation as the medium to long term effects of this will be people living atparental home arrested development single parenting general dysfunction which are all drivers of stress drug use alcohol misuse crime etc.

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Blog

Are landlord incentives the answer to tenant insecurity?

Today's Observer declares that the "home-owning democracy", that elusive vision beloved of the Conservatives since Thatcher, is finished. 

Obs_0502.jpg 

Ahead of next week's Housing White Paper, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid says, "We understand people are living longer in private rented accommodation", which is the closest the government has come to admitting that their policies to help first-time buyers can only go so far. 

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Housing White Paper: could Starter Homes be genuinely affordable?

As the publication date for the government's Housing White Paper approaches, we and groups across the the housing world are hoping for an announcement that will signal a 'whole new mindset', as the Secretary of State has promised.

One item that will be included is confirmation of how the government's long-running Starter Homes policy will work - and the detail will tell us how far it will go towards slowing the affordability crisis for first-time buyers. This is the government's flagship policy that was pitched as "turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy".

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Are banks behind your latest rent rise?

This morning, Mortgage Strategy magazine and the Daily Telegraph reported that Santander is requiring its buy-to-let borrowers to raise the rent on their tenants as high as possible.

The bank even demands that landlords get a valuation of the market rent every time the tenancy is up for renewal and then "take all steps to ensure that the review [with the tenant] takes place and leads to the maximum increase in the rent which can reasonably be achieved."

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Fuel poverty update: we can’t have any more delays in supporting renters in the coldest homes

Just before Christmas, as the weather got colder and government released its latest update on the fuel poverty statistics, there was still no news for private renters who need clarity about the detail of minimum energy efficiency standards in the PRS.

The statistics showed that one in five private rented households are officially fuel poor, and that the average ‘fuel poverty gap’ – the amount of money needed for a household to escape fuel poverty – is highest for private renters.

Despite these worrying trends, there is, in theory at least, some light at the end of the tunnel – but delays in implementing the policy need to be quickly remedied for that to be realised.

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Help lead Generation Rent - apply to join the board

Generation Rent would be nothing without the people who donate their money or time to the cause. We have a team of two full-time staff going into 2017, and we are ever more reliant on the generosity of our supporters.

The organisation is governed by a board of unpaid trustees, who support the team and enable us to devote as much of our energy to campaigning for renters' rights and building the wider movement.

With the need to develop the diversity of our funding, and new opportunities to make the most of, we are recruiting several new trustees who will help us do this.

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Changes at Generation Rent

Since its launch, Generation Rent has achieved a series of improvements to the lives of renters, including:

  • Outlawing of revenge evictions
  • Making landlords pay their fair share of tax
  • Stronger regulation of landlords and letting agents
  • A proposed ban on letting fees 

The growing renter population finally has a voice, but it needs to be much stronger.

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Build-to-Rent: A new vision for London housing, but who is it for?

For many years, debates around housing supply have suggested that a model needs to be worked up that leverages investment into building new long-term, professionally managed privately rented accommodation, as is much more normal in other countries around the world.

Generation Rent has always argued that new supply will only help a small percentage of lucky renters, and that the priority should be to support legislative reform that would improve things for the over two million London renters in existing stock. 

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Property guardians speak out about Wild West sector

Some of you will have read stories in the past year or two about property guardians. Originally a low cost way of beating extortionate private rental prices, the scheme has been coming under fire for rent hikes, poor living conditions and a lack of regulation.

I run a Facebook-based campaign and support group called Property Guardians UK. Over the past 2 years I have collected stories and information from those who came to my site and provided some with legal advice on problems they had with their agencies. I am also a guardian myself, currently in my 8th year in the scheme.

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Huge victory for renters as Chancellor bans fees

There was some extra cash for "affordable" housing in Philip Hammond's Autumn Statement, but there was only really one big story from today:

The Government is going to ban letting fees!

This is a phenomenal achievement and the result of a tireless campaign over recent years by us, Shelter, Citizens Advice, the Debrief and local renter groups around the country.

Dozens of us investigated our local letting agents to build up the case for reform on www.lettingfees.co.uk. Thousands of us signed petitions and wrote to our MPs and the government listened. 

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The Redfern Review: A grown-up take on the housing crisis

Earlier this year, Labour commissioned the chief executive of the country's biggest house builder to lead a study of the decline in home ownership - the main reason politicians are worried about housing these days.

The Redfern Review has been published today. It shouldn't be a great surprise that its conclusions don't fit completely with our views - there's very little comment on the needs of private renters - but it does make an important contribution to the debate, and there's a lot we can agree on. Indeed, it takes a more objective approach than parties and industry players have done when they've tackled the same subject - there's refreshingly little dogma or evidence of Taylor Wimpey's commercial interests at play (though it plays down builders' profit-driven reluctance to build enough homes).

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