GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-04-14 13:56:05 +0100
    Foxwatcher, Housing profits up by 1400% since 1971! I take it you are advocating the taxing of ALL profits on the sale of homes whether as Buy to Lets or not, Many people have lived in their family homes, paid off their mortgages and when the children have grown up and left home have sold and downsized taking smaller, more affordable homes from our younger generation whilst driving up the price of these and at the same time using the huge profits from the sale of their family homes to fund their extravagant retirement lifestyle.
  • commented 2015-04-14 10:53:52 +0100
    I’ve already spoken face to face with a previous housing minister, Lee, and you’re quite right that there is little political will to change this. What I was hoping to get from this forum is a public backing to try to change this inertia. I feel the major enticement for these people is the capital profit (up 1400% since 1997!) and it’s this that need punitively taxing. Forget charitable donations, this is our children and the next generation who are being exploited.
  • commented 2015-04-13 20:40:06 +0100
    I agree that private landlords contribute very little to society, but I am not sure that there would ever be the political will to stop them completely.

    What we need is government to understand the issues and start making private landlord pay payments on the gross rents not net profit after they have stripped all the costs out (including charitable donations which are effectively private education fees for children and grandchildren)

    If anyone can get me in front of the next housing minister, I would gladly help shape a fair housing policy !
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:41:41 +0100
    John, I’m not commenting on whether or not Landlords are good, bad or indifferent. Frankly, if you choose to rent on the private sector, this is a chance you have to take, and there are bodies in existence with whom you can take matters of this nature up. I’m saying, bluntly, that private landlords should be outlawed as they are selfishly taking houses away from prospective owner occupiers, and causing misery to that generation, to selfishly feather their own nests. Rental properties should be owned only by local authorities, housing associations, bodies such as universities where appropriate, or multinational companies for employees who they may need to move about the world. Not greedy speculators…
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:30:55 +0100
    I feel the best way to get a fair deal for Landlords and tenants is for all private and housing associations to be licensed to be a Landlord and that they adhere to certain safety and standards for the best protection for tenants, and if Licence revoked they must put right or be unable to take take rents until they do, and the licence fee monies to pay for licence monitors assessors mediators, to work on behalf of Landlords and tenants.
  • commented 2015-04-12 12:32:31 +0100
    Thanks for your support, Lee. I actually think some of the penalties should be even stronger. Buy to let mortgages should be made illegal, an annual punitive tax should be levied on the total value of the portfolio of any British domiciled landlord, and profit made on the sale of rental property to be taxed at above 90%. Profit on the sale of rental property owned by overseas individuals or companies to be at least 95% and a ban on any rental payments leaving this country, so that money so raised goes back into the British economy, not somewhere abroad.
    As and when your kids get to the age of leaving home, changes like this may mean they have options. My son, and thousands of his generation, have been sold down the river and terribly exploited by greedy, selfish buy to let landlords who make profits on the back of this generation’s misfortunes. Shame on all landlords and managing agents. How would you like society to exploit your own personal situation so brutally?

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Blog

Landlords and mortgages: what do we know?

Whenever you propose reform of private renting, the landlord lobby always says no, because "landlords couldn't afford it". Whether it's asking landlords to cover the cost of letting agent fees, to apply for a licence, to charge controlled rents, or to pay tax on their loans, we're asked to believe that they can't afford it. Then they threaten to raise rents - as if rents haven't already been outpacing inflation since the end of the recession.

This claim assumes that landlords are already paying large amounts of their revenue out again in costs. Some of them are, but we point out that the majority are not, because they don't have a mortgage.

For example, an interest-only mortgage of £150,000 at 4% costs £6000 a year. Rent on the £200,000 property bought with that mortgage might get you £10,000. Two thirds of private rented properties have no mortgage, and thus have significantly lower costs and capacity to absorb new regulatory requirements.

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Don't be fooled: Help to Buy is still dangerous

Yesterday, the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, confirmed that the Help to Buy Mortgage Guarantee scheme would wind up at the end of the year. This was arguably the more controversial of the two Help to Buy schemes announced in the 2013 Budget, but it was originally meant to last only 3 years. And with it gone, we're still left with a Help to Buy loan scheme that is highly counterproductive to any efforts to fix the housing crisis.

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The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 1 – rent levels)

During his recent visit to New York City, the Mayor of London took the opportunity to announce one of his key pre-election pledges for the private rented sector, the London Living Rent.

Doing so while overseas was both surprising and interesting and his visit to New York highlighted the challenges facing the Mayors of both cities.

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London's turning - Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor

Today Generation Rent publishes 'London's Turning: Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor', our call on Sadiq Khan to act rapidly and boldly in his response to the capital's housing crisis.

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London's housing costs are driving families away

Today we have called on the Mayor of London to adopt a set of policies that will speed up his efforts to end the capital’s housing crisis.

To remind him what’s at stake, we have uncovered another startling trend that is hurting the city and its people.

Every year the Office for National Statistics releases figures on internal migration – how many people move from one part of the UK to another – and people are moving out of London at an alarming rate.  

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Looking for cheap rent in London? Just become an artist then

Proposals this week to implement cheap rents for London's artists show how the the city's housing crisis makes an absurdity of good intentions, and indicates why a closer link to universality rather than targeting is needed to make renting affordable again in the capital.

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Making overseas investment work for Londoners

The issue of foreign investors pumping money into the London property market has once again been raised by last night’s BBC report on a rise in overseas investment in the outer London boroughs, and how this provides competition for first-time buyers.

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Private renters are Londoners too…

As Sadiq Khan announced the membership of his new Homes for Londoners board last week, the private rented sector was conspicuous by its absence. Despite close to one third of Londoners privately renting, the new body has not yet made provision for either tenants’ voices to be heard, nor for a clear focus on the PRS to be part of HfL’s work.

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Does your MP support a ban on letting fees?

Go straight to the campaign page

We have been banging on about banning letting fees for more than two years now. The case against them keeps getting stronger.

The latest evidence is from the English Housing Survey, which revealed in July that up to 69% of tenants living in unsatisfactory homes are discouraged from moving out because of the cost of agent fees. It also suggests the scam is worth around £115m a year.* 

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The decline of ownership, and meaningless means

A version of this article appeared on Inside Housing.

Last Tuesday, the Resolution Foundation dominated the headlines and airwaves with its report into levels of home ownership. Using figures from the Labour Force Survey, their big finding was that Greater Manchester saw the biggest fall in owner occupation from its peak at the turn of the century. It was a pattern seen across the north.

It’s no shock that the housing crisis is gripping the whole country. Our analysis of the 2011 census in 2014 found that ownership levels were already dropping in major urban areas. These figures are a bit more up to date.

While London and the South East have the most insane house prices, buying a home anywhere has become more difficult. This is because wages haven’t risen by much, and more people are in insecure employment, so it’s harder to save and to qualify for a mortgage. House prices became uncoupled from wages before the credit crunch, and didn’t revert to affordable levels after it.

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