GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-04-15 11:02:36 +0100
    I’ve had the chance to think more about my reply to Stephen yesterday. Firstly, I’ve checked and I stand by my original view that prices of buy to let properties have risen by 1400% since 1997. Some landlords are now selling to take profit, and the buyers are frequently more landlords eager to make the same profits. Taxing capital profit at 95%+ will stop this. Secondly, regarding pensioners selling, downsizing and funding comfortable retirements – it’s a much muddier issue, but anyone getting onto the housing ladder when young will eventually end up with a much appreciated asset which they own outright. The important thing is that they’ll then have somewhere to live without further outgoings at a time when they presumably have reduced income. But they eventually have to do something with it. If subject to punitive tax on the profit, they’ll just sit on it despite it perhaps being too big or expensive for them to maintain, and cause a blockage in the natural cycle of others upsizing. So I’m against charging this level of tax on profit on owner occupiers’ primary residences. If they do sell and downsize, they free up property for younger larger families to move into. If they then spend the profit rather than leaving it to their families, they have at least earned the money they paid, not leeched it from the pockets of the younger generation denying them the opportunity to advance their own lives. So sorry, Stephen, my original point stands. Tax profiteering landlords out of the market.
  • commented 2015-04-14 15:44:22 +0100
    I heard 1997, Stephen, but am happy to be corrected. There are always going to be some selfish people who mess things up for the majority, whether they’re avaricious landlords or selfish pensioners blowing the kids’ inheritance. Personally, I intend to leave as substantial an amount for mine as is practicable, but there is a point there that needs addressing. Maybe large tax bills if old folks don’t move to a retirement home or something of that nature. There’s limited space here to discuss all details, but the biggest problem is the two groups I’ve defined. If we don’t stop them now, all future generations will be forever living in rented accomodation to fund lazy good for nothings who sit around all day. living the high life without ever having worked hard. At least pensioners will have worked for the money they pay off their mortgages with, not grabbed it from the younger generations pockets.
  • commented 2015-04-14 13:56:05 +0100
    Foxwatcher, Housing profits up by 1400% since 1971! I take it you are advocating the taxing of ALL profits on the sale of homes whether as Buy to Lets or not, Many people have lived in their family homes, paid off their mortgages and when the children have grown up and left home have sold and downsized taking smaller, more affordable homes from our younger generation whilst driving up the price of these and at the same time using the huge profits from the sale of their family homes to fund their extravagant retirement lifestyle.
  • commented 2015-04-14 10:53:52 +0100
    I’ve already spoken face to face with a previous housing minister, Lee, and you’re quite right that there is little political will to change this. What I was hoping to get from this forum is a public backing to try to change this inertia. I feel the major enticement for these people is the capital profit (up 1400% since 1997!) and it’s this that need punitively taxing. Forget charitable donations, this is our children and the next generation who are being exploited.
  • commented 2015-04-13 20:40:06 +0100
    I agree that private landlords contribute very little to society, but I am not sure that there would ever be the political will to stop them completely.

    What we need is government to understand the issues and start making private landlord pay payments on the gross rents not net profit after they have stripped all the costs out (including charitable donations which are effectively private education fees for children and grandchildren)

    If anyone can get me in front of the next housing minister, I would gladly help shape a fair housing policy !
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:41:41 +0100
    John, I’m not commenting on whether or not Landlords are good, bad or indifferent. Frankly, if you choose to rent on the private sector, this is a chance you have to take, and there are bodies in existence with whom you can take matters of this nature up. I’m saying, bluntly, that private landlords should be outlawed as they are selfishly taking houses away from prospective owner occupiers, and causing misery to that generation, to selfishly feather their own nests. Rental properties should be owned only by local authorities, housing associations, bodies such as universities where appropriate, or multinational companies for employees who they may need to move about the world. Not greedy speculators…

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Blog

Are banks behind your latest rent rise?

This morning, Mortgage Strategy magazine and the Daily Telegraph reported that Santander is requiring its buy-to-let borrowers to raise the rent on their tenants as high as possible.

The bank even demands that landlords get a valuation of the market rent every time the tenancy is up for renewal and then "take all steps to ensure that the review [with the tenant] takes place and leads to the maximum increase in the rent which can reasonably be achieved."

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Fuel poverty update: we can’t have any more delays in supporting renters in the coldest homes

Just before Christmas, as the weather got colder and government released its latest update on the fuel poverty statistics, there was still no news for private renters who need clarity about the detail of minimum energy efficiency standards in the PRS.

The statistics showed that one in five private rented households are officially fuel poor, and that the average ‘fuel poverty gap’ – the amount of money needed for a household to escape fuel poverty – is highest for private renters.

Despite these worrying trends, there is, in theory at least, some light at the end of the tunnel – but delays in implementing the policy need to be quickly remedied for that to be realised.

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Help lead Generation Rent - apply to join the board

Generation Rent would be nothing without the people who donate their money or time to the cause. We have a team of two full-time staff going into 2017, and we are ever more reliant on the generosity of our supporters.

The organisation is governed by a board of unpaid trustees, who support the team and enable us to devote as much of our energy to campaigning for renters' rights and building the wider movement.

With the need to develop the diversity of our funding, and new opportunities to make the most of, we are recruiting several new trustees who will help us do this.

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Changes at Generation Rent

Since its launch, Generation Rent has achieved a series of improvements to the lives of renters, including:

  • Outlawing of revenge evictions
  • Making landlords pay their fair share of tax
  • Stronger regulation of landlords and letting agents
  • A proposed ban on letting fees 

The growing renter population finally has a voice, but it needs to be much stronger.

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Build-to-Rent: A new vision for London housing, but who is it for?

For many years, debates around housing supply have suggested that a model needs to be worked up that leverages investment into building new long-term, professionally managed privately rented accommodation, as is much more normal in other countries around the world.

Generation Rent has always argued that new supply will only help a small percentage of lucky renters, and that the priority should be to support legislative reform that would improve things for the over two million London renters in existing stock. 

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Property guardians speak out about Wild West sector

Some of you will have read stories in the past year or two about property guardians. Originally a low cost way of beating extortionate private rental prices, the scheme has been coming under fire for rent hikes, poor living conditions and a lack of regulation.

I run a Facebook-based campaign and support group called Property Guardians UK. Over the past 2 years I have collected stories and information from those who came to my site and provided some with legal advice on problems they had with their agencies. I am also a guardian myself, currently in my 8th year in the scheme.

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Huge victory for renters as Chancellor bans fees

There was some extra cash for "affordable" housing in Philip Hammond's Autumn Statement, but there was only really one big story from today:

The Government is going to ban letting fees!

This is a phenomenal achievement and the result of a tireless campaign over recent years by us, Shelter, Citizens Advice, the Debrief and local renter groups around the country.

Dozens of us investigated our local letting agents to build up the case for reform on www.lettingfees.co.uk. Thousands of us signed petitions and wrote to our MPs and the government listened. 

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The Redfern Review: A grown-up take on the housing crisis

Earlier this year, Labour commissioned the chief executive of the country's biggest house builder to lead a study of the decline in home ownership - the main reason politicians are worried about housing these days.

The Redfern Review has been published today. It shouldn't be a great surprise that its conclusions don't fit completely with our views - there's very little comment on the needs of private renters - but it does make an important contribution to the debate, and there's a lot we can agree on. Indeed, it takes a more objective approach than parties and industry players have done when they've tackled the same subject - there's refreshingly little dogma or evidence of Taylor Wimpey's commercial interests at play (though it plays down builders' profit-driven reluctance to build enough homes).

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Another result of London’s failed housing system – increased child poverty

Figures produced by the End Child Poverty Coalition this week show distressing levels of child poverty after housing costs are included, including within much of London.

The data breaks down levels of child poverty by parliamentary constituency, local authority, and local ward level, and shows that of the twenty constituencies with the highest levels of child poverty, seven are in London, while 11 out of 20 of the highest figures at local authority level are also in the capital.

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Here's another reason to boo rising house prices

I bet you thought rising house prices just made it more difficult for you to ever own your own home.

Well, it's even worse than that. 

Rising house prices increase your risk of being evicted. 

Already angry? Jump straight to our campaign page.

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