GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-04-14 15:44:22 +0100
    I heard 1997, Stephen, but am happy to be corrected. There are always going to be some selfish people who mess things up for the majority, whether they’re avaricious landlords or selfish pensioners blowing the kids’ inheritance. Personally, I intend to leave as substantial an amount for mine as is practicable, but there is a point there that needs addressing. Maybe large tax bills if old folks don’t move to a retirement home or something of that nature. There’s limited space here to discuss all details, but the biggest problem is the two groups I’ve defined. If we don’t stop them now, all future generations will be forever living in rented accomodation to fund lazy good for nothings who sit around all day. living the high life without ever having worked hard. At least pensioners will have worked for the money they pay off their mortgages with, not grabbed it from the younger generations pockets.
  • commented 2015-04-14 13:56:05 +0100
    Foxwatcher, Housing profits up by 1400% since 1971! I take it you are advocating the taxing of ALL profits on the sale of homes whether as Buy to Lets or not, Many people have lived in their family homes, paid off their mortgages and when the children have grown up and left home have sold and downsized taking smaller, more affordable homes from our younger generation whilst driving up the price of these and at the same time using the huge profits from the sale of their family homes to fund their extravagant retirement lifestyle.
  • commented 2015-04-14 10:53:52 +0100
    I’ve already spoken face to face with a previous housing minister, Lee, and you’re quite right that there is little political will to change this. What I was hoping to get from this forum is a public backing to try to change this inertia. I feel the major enticement for these people is the capital profit (up 1400% since 1997!) and it’s this that need punitively taxing. Forget charitable donations, this is our children and the next generation who are being exploited.
  • commented 2015-04-13 20:40:06 +0100
    I agree that private landlords contribute very little to society, but I am not sure that there would ever be the political will to stop them completely.

    What we need is government to understand the issues and start making private landlord pay payments on the gross rents not net profit after they have stripped all the costs out (including charitable donations which are effectively private education fees for children and grandchildren)

    If anyone can get me in front of the next housing minister, I would gladly help shape a fair housing policy !
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:41:41 +0100
    John, I’m not commenting on whether or not Landlords are good, bad or indifferent. Frankly, if you choose to rent on the private sector, this is a chance you have to take, and there are bodies in existence with whom you can take matters of this nature up. I’m saying, bluntly, that private landlords should be outlawed as they are selfishly taking houses away from prospective owner occupiers, and causing misery to that generation, to selfishly feather their own nests. Rental properties should be owned only by local authorities, housing associations, bodies such as universities where appropriate, or multinational companies for employees who they may need to move about the world. Not greedy speculators…
  • commented 2015-04-13 17:30:55 +0100
    I feel the best way to get a fair deal for Landlords and tenants is for all private and housing associations to be licensed to be a Landlord and that they adhere to certain safety and standards for the best protection for tenants, and if Licence revoked they must put right or be unable to take take rents until they do, and the licence fee monies to pay for licence monitors assessors mediators, to work on behalf of Landlords and tenants.

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Blog

Here's another reason to boo rising house prices

I bet you thought rising house prices just made it more difficult for you to ever own your own home.

Well, it's even worse than that. 

Rising house prices increase your risk of being evicted. 

Already angry? Jump straight to our campaign page.

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The UK's first online landlord checking service

Paul Munday is the founder of RentProfile. For more useful websites for renters, visit our resources page.

A few years ago my brother David was the victim of a rental scam. It was this experience that led us to research the scale of the problem and start to think about ways to raise awareness and maybe even prevent this kind of fraud from happening in the first place.

We realised there is a compromise when seeking a rental today: either go through a letting agent which may charge excessive fees, or use a listings site where there's a chance of being scammed. It wasn't difficult to find fake listings on websites. Renters told us they were daunted by paying out thousands to a landlord (who is a stranger) but did so as they had little choice.

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Top 10 tips to cut your electricity bill

Thomas Karcher runs Kagoo.co.uk

With sky-high rents squeezing tenant’s budgets, bills are yet another unwelcome expense. However, it is possible to significantly reduce your electricity bill by following our Top 10 electricity saving tips.

1. Check your electricity tariff

As a tenant you are free to switch electricity suppliers without requiring permission from the landlord. Compare tariffs, duel fuel discounts and payment options to ensure you get the best deal.

Please note some agents try and tie tenants into energy deals with a preferred provider. Generation Rent would like to hear if you have been affected by this.

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The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 2 - tenancies)

In September, following the Mayor’s release of some details for this London Living Rent proposal, we blogged about concerns around how genuinely affordable this new tenure would be, and what was needed to ensure it was part of the solution to London’s housing crisis.

This follow-up piece looks at what wasn’t covered in the first blog – broadly, tenancy types – and how again they might best serve Londoners just looking for somewhere affordable and secure to live.

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Property industry tries to block government's best housing policy

With a new Prime Minister and a new Chancellor heavily modifying their predecessors’ policies on the deficit, “affordable” housing and schools, the property industry is hopeful that the government will pursue similar revisionism on its landlord tax policy.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors this week called on the government to scrap the stamp duty surcharge on buy-to-let and second homes, while landlords have been in the High Court to challenge the withdrawal of mortgage interest tax relief for landlords paying higher rate income tax.

We’ve just learned that there will not be a judicial review of the government’s policy.

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Landlords and mortgages: what do we know?

Whenever you propose reform of private renting, the landlord lobby always says no, because "landlords couldn't afford it". Whether it's asking landlords to cover the cost of letting agent fees, to apply for a licence, to charge controlled rents, or to pay tax on their loans, we're asked to believe that they can't afford it. Then they threaten to raise rents - as if rents haven't already been outpacing inflation since the end of the recession.

This claim assumes that landlords are already paying large amounts of their revenue out again in costs. Some of them are, but we point out that the majority are not, because they don't have a mortgage.

For example, an interest-only mortgage of £150,000 at 4% costs £6000 a year. Rent on the £200,000 property bought with that mortgage might get you £10,000. Two thirds of private rented properties have no mortgage, and thus have significantly lower costs and capacity to absorb new regulatory requirements.

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Don't be fooled: Help to Buy is still dangerous

Yesterday, the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, confirmed that the Help to Buy Mortgage Guarantee scheme would wind up at the end of the year. This was arguably the more controversial of the two Help to Buy schemes announced in the 2013 Budget, but it was originally meant to last only 3 years. And with it gone, we're still left with a Help to Buy loan scheme that is highly counterproductive to any efforts to fix the housing crisis.

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The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 1 – rent levels)

During his recent visit to New York City, the Mayor of London took the opportunity to announce one of his key pre-election pledges for the private rented sector, the London Living Rent.

Doing so while overseas was both surprising and interesting and his visit to New York highlighted the challenges facing the Mayors of both cities.

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London's turning - Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor

Today Generation Rent publishes 'London's Turning: Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor', our call on Sadiq Khan to act rapidly and boldly in his response to the capital's housing crisis.

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London's housing costs are driving families away

Today we have called on the Mayor of London to adopt a set of policies that will speed up his efforts to end the capital’s housing crisis.

To remind him what’s at stake, we have uncovered another startling trend that is hurting the city and its people.

Every year the Office for National Statistics releases figures on internal migration – how many people move from one part of the UK to another – and people are moving out of London at an alarming rate.  

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