GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-05-27 05:06:15 +0100
    Things appear not to have changed much. At least not for the better. I remember paying exhorbitant rent for a small furnished room with a broken bed. When the little “Baby Belling” cooker in the corner of the single room gave me electric shocks, I was told by the landlord that,“If you don’t like the cooker just don’t use it!” (But then most of his attention was going into maximising profits from his “private hire/mini-cab” business. So what could I expect.)
  • commented 2015-05-13 21:34:26 +0100
    Firstly there are many young adults who don’t live at home and simply can’t get the experience they need to start a job so they are stuck with a rubbishly paid apprenticeship wage and 400pm is not enough to live on quite frankly. Not when you need to put food in the cupboards, paying rent as well as maintaining a professional look, ie smart clothing for the job. There isn’t anything that helps the young adults that are really trying to do everything they can to get to that goal of having a job, career and a self contained flat/house for themselves but how are they supposed to afford one when they are on an apprenticeship wage? Some properties starting in the region of 800pm in cities and therefore is not fair on the people who have an apprenticeship and working 40 hours a week for £400pm. It needs to be changed. Some companies hire apprentices cause they are affectly cheaper to hire! Money needs to come up and fast minimum wage needs to come up and living and tax needs to come down. It’s not fair that all the politicians are so wealthy I’d love to see you all living off £400pm and living in a council flat or a room in a house and doing the hours. Maybe there should be a program about it! It’s ridiculous, everyone should be on a wage of £10 an hour regardless of the age of you are if your doing the same job there shouldn’t be any arguments in the wages, give us all a chance to pay less tax, tax the rich more than the poor we are the ones suffering and I think politicians should be taxed twice as much. Your all making money by employing members of the family so you have nothing to worry about your still going to be rich and have someone to drive you around and pick up your dry cleaning.
  • commented 2015-05-11 17:15:01 +0100
    What now the Conservatives are back,when will Section 21 a primative law be abolished?
  • commented 2015-05-07 19:10:23 +0100
    I was sorry to read the stories of Paul and Anne. But the answer is simple. Ban private landlords by taxing them so it becomes financially impossible for them to exist, sell all their housing to the existing occupiers, or to local authorities or establishments such as universities where appropriate, and put legislation in place to ensure that they rent in a fair and proper manner. Private landlords are the root of 99% of these issues, whether it’s because they are poor landlords with no sense of responsibility, or whether they are just plain greedy.
  • commented 2015-05-07 12:42:26 +0100
    My daughter and her partner have just learned, without any warning, that their landlord intends to sell the house. This will be the third time in six years they have been forced to move.

    Here is a reply from Alan Duncan MP to my Generation Rent’s “Please stand up for renters by supporting rent control” email:

    “Rent controls never work – they destroy investment in housing leading to fewer homes to rent and poorer quality accommodation. Last time they were used in the UK they led to a collapse in the size of the private rented sector.

    The only way to have affordable rents is to build more homes. That is why we are investing £400 million in building 10,000 new homes that will be let out below market rent to help people save up for a deposit and buy their own home. We are also able to offer guarantees to housing providers and investors, enabling them to borrow at cheaper rates and build tens of thousands of new homes, including 30,000 new affordable homes through the Affordable Housing Guarantee scheme. Thanks to our long-term economic plan house building is now at its highest level since 2007.

    We want to see a private rented sector that is more transparent, gives greater certainty to hardworking families, especially those with children of school age, and which delivers higher standards and more affordable rents.

    · Rent controls in the UK reduced private rented housing stock. Rent controls resulted in the size of the private rented sector shrinking from 55 per cent of households in 1939 to just 8 per cent in the late 1980s. Rent controls also meant that many landlords could not afford to improve or maintain their homes.

    · The Institute of Economic Affairs has said rent controls will lead to higher rents. They have said that ‘sincerents can alter between tenancies, tenancy rent controls cannot improve affordability for any group other than in the very short term. It is most likely to simply change the timing of rent costs over a tenancy by raising initial rents. Indeed the existence of these [rent] controls may even increase market rents overall’.

    · The OECD says that rent controls push down housing supply. The OECD have made clear that rent controlsreduce the supply of rented housing, saying that ‘easing the relatively strict rent controls and tenant-landlord regulations that are found in some Nordic and continental European countries could significantly increase residential mobility by improving the supply of rental housing and preventing the locking-in of tenants’.

    · Since 2010 average rents in England have fallen in real terms. According to the latest ONS figures, in the period May 2010 to December 2014 average rents in England fell by 1.3 per cent in real terms (Hansard, 2 February 2015, Col. 222996, link).

    · Building more homes to rent. Through the Build to Rent Fund we are providing finance, along with private sector investment, to build new purpose-built privately rented homes. 14 contracts have already been signed which are worth £230 million and will deliver over 3,000 homes to rent. When all agreements are finalised during 2015 £1 billion of investment will be provided which will deliver 10,000 new homes to rent. We have also used the government’s hard-won fiscal credibility to offer guarantees to housing providers and investors, enabling them to borrow at cheaper rates and build tens of thousands of new homes, including 30,000 new affordable homes through the Affordable Housing Guarantee scheme.

    · Labour’s plans for more regulation and rent controls would make life harder for tenants. Labour’s plans forrent controls, banning letting agents’ fees for tenants, and blanket local and national landlord licensing schemes would lead to higher rents as landlords pass on extra costs to tenants. It would also undermine investment in housing making it harder for people to find a good quality, safe and affordable home to rent. Ultimately a reduced supply of rental homes will mean higher rents and less choice for tenants."


    Alan Duncan
  • commented 2015-05-07 08:46:57 +0100
    My grandchildren live in Southgate, London. They are again set to move at the end of this month; fourth time in 6 years. I am kind of happy they are moving from The house they are currently because there was a fire start from the electrical terminal and luckily my grandson, 8 years, noticed the smoke coming from the under stair cupboard! That was a year ago and I have been worried ever since because the electrics are dodgy. The current landlord has warned that come the 1st June the builders will be in and the roof off – intimidation or what. Shame on him and he has children himself. My daughter tells me the rents have increased by about 20% in the last 18 months. So, finding somewhere in the local vicinity will prove to be difficult. She has to date not found another place.
    The other thing is, their father also lives in rented housing and he has also had to move within the last year. So, really, the children have moved at least 7 times within the last 6 years.
    I try to remain positive and class each new move as an adventure and pose it as thus to the children. Inside, I feel distraught for my grandchildren and their parents. Both their parents are hard working and loving and I feel sure this love helps to sustain them.

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Lessons from Germany: tenant power in the rental market

Last month the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) released its report “Lessons from Germany: Tenant power in the rental market”. It examines the relative strength of protection for German renters, and how these benefits might be brought across to England.

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Making housing about immigration continues to be a toxic mix

Back in late 2015, when the details about making landlords check the immigration status of prospective tenants was being debated in parliament, housing and migrant groups repeatedly warned government that this would lead to discrimination, and push vulnerable renters into precarious and hidden housing.

Today a new report from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI) on the 'Right to Rent' scheme confirms that warning, with shocking findings of non-British and non-white renters finding it more difficult to access a new tenancy.

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Government consults on banning orders - renters respond

We have put in our response to the government’s consultation on banning orders – the new mechanism to prevent criminals from operating in the rental market. That’s right, they aren’t banned already.

The government has asked what types of offences should be banworthy, and set a deadline of midnight tonight.

We asked our supporters for their experiences earlier in the week, dozens of you responded, and the feedback has helped shape our response to the government.

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Housing White Paper: where do we stand now?

Well, the Housing White Paper was a massive disappointment. After an exciting glimpse on Sunday of moves to "incentivise" longer tenancies, on Tuesday it became clear that those incentives were existing government subsidies for companies building new homes. Number of beneficiaries: 80,322 (not counting the companies who would have offered longer tenancies anyway).

For the 4.3 million households in existing properties? The vague undertaking to "consider what more we can do to support families already renting privately, while encouraging continued investment in the sector." Which gives little hope to people who don't live with their family and a lot of hope to property speculators.

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Housing White Paper: Our immediate reaction

Commenting on the Housing White Paper, Dan Wilson Craw, Director of Generation Rent, said:

“Sajid Javid has the right analysis about the plight of renters, but his White Paper has failed to offer us anything of substance.

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Removing criminals from the housing market

Although the 2016 Housing and Planning Act paved the way for the mass sell-off of council houses, eroded security for social tenants and watered down the affordability of new homes, it also made it possible to ban criminals from letting out properties, with new Banning Orders. 

As we await the Housing White Paper to see how far the government will go to improve private renting further - and how much it will atone for the damage it caused to social housing - we are drafting our feedback on how Banning Orders will work. 

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Are landlord incentives the answer to tenant insecurity?

Today's Observer declares that the "home-owning democracy", that elusive vision beloved of the Conservatives since Thatcher, is finished. 


Ahead of next week's Housing White Paper, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid says, "We understand people are living longer in private rented accommodation", which is the closest the government has come to admitting that their policies to help first-time buyers can only go so far. 

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Housing White Paper: could Starter Homes be genuinely affordable?

As the publication date for the government's Housing White Paper approaches, we and groups across the the housing world are hoping for an announcement that will signal a 'whole new mindset', as the Secretary of State has promised.

One item that will be included is confirmation of how the government's long-running Starter Homes policy will work - and the detail will tell us how far it will go towards slowing the affordability crisis for first-time buyers. This is the government's flagship policy that was pitched as "turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy".

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Are banks behind your latest rent rise?

This morning, Mortgage Strategy magazine and the Daily Telegraph reported that Santander is requiring its buy-to-let borrowers to raise the rent on their tenants as high as possible.

The bank even demands that landlords get a valuation of the market rent every time the tenancy is up for renewal and then "take all steps to ensure that the review [with the tenant] takes place and leads to the maximum increase in the rent which can reasonably be achieved."

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Fuel poverty update: we can’t have any more delays in supporting renters in the coldest homes

Just before Christmas, as the weather got colder and government released its latest update on the fuel poverty statistics, there was still no news for private renters who need clarity about the detail of minimum energy efficiency standards in the PRS.

The statistics showed that one in five private rented households are officially fuel poor, and that the average ‘fuel poverty gap’ – the amount of money needed for a household to escape fuel poverty – is highest for private renters.

Despite these worrying trends, there is, in theory at least, some light at the end of the tunnel – but delays in implementing the policy need to be quickly remedied for that to be realised.

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