GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:20:25 +0100
    I think you’re completely right Doreen. Council houses should not be sold off and if they are they most certainly shouldn’t be with obscene discounts. I’m afraid you’re right that they may well end up with private landlords, well that would have potentially been the case without this limitation on mortgage interest relief. However where we will disagree to a small extent is to the depth of youngsters not being able to afford a house. Most definitely the case with many and actually I didn’t buy my first one till I was nearly 30, BUT many youngsters want the latest iphone, cars, tablets, and all the other trinkets of the modern world. I didn’t have any of those and boy did I save. That is not what most of the youngsters do now, instead they blow their money on all these things and foreign holidays. If youngsters saved more they’d be surprised just what they could afford.
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:03:20 +0100
    My parents’ generation were “renters”. Albeit they were lucky to have a great “council owned” property. My generation were the ones who “owned” their homes. Today, we have gone back to the 40s and more people are having to rent. There are good landlords and some not so good. Buying “to let” is a growth market. To equal up the market there should be more “council” and “social” houses built. Affordable rents and sound landlords. Sadly, much of the “council” stock was sold off in the 80/90s and today it appears that even “social” housing will be sold off. Many of these hands will end up in the hands of private landlords.
  • commented 2015-10-06 18:58:25 +0100
    As Stephen Tunney said Foxwatcher, you crave for Utopia. However I agree that social housing should be provided by the State, but alas it isn’t. The State haven’t put any real effort into building for the last 30 years so where would you have all these men, women and children live??? I only have one HB tenant and she’s not my best by any means, but it seems you’ll be pleased to know that she’ll be the first to go, along with her children. Gosh that must make you happy! As for taking homes from first time buyers there has been no study of this done by anyone so prove what you say has any real value. Certainly I have purchased no houses a FTB would want as they’re all too large and some were on the market for literally years. I bought when others would not and I’ve made properties fit for habitation again. Instead of jealousy clouding your judgement actually talk with real-life landlords that have given people somewhere to live that would otherwise have none and on low rents too. Now the days of low rents will go. Also you bang on about us owning houses that the State should own. Let’s go the whole hog then, let’s have the State own our food shops too, after all it’s another basic human need. Let’s have them own M&S, TopShop and all the other clothes retailers as well as clothes are another basic human need. Let’s build that Utopia Foxwatcher! Let’s join George O as the builders of the nation! Oh sorry, this is the real world isn’t it.
  • commented 2015-10-06 17:49:58 +0100
    Private landlords need to think of someone other than themselves and their fat bank accounts. There is indeed a place for rental accommodation for many good reasons. But these should be owned by properly regulated Housing Associations, local councils, universities or similar responsible organisations, so that profits, both from rental income and from capital appreciation are used for the good of these organisations. They should not be owned by private individuals getting tax breaks on mortgage interest, repairs, profits and all the rest, borrowing obscene amounts of money with little or no checks such as those now faced by owner occupiers and buying up all the cheaper properties which would otherwise be targets for first time owner occupier buyers. Because of this, those who desperately want to buy but cannot because of you parasites, have to rent, as well as those who choose to do so for perfectly valid reasons. This is not about good or bad landlords, it’s about removing the aspiration to buy from a whole generation who want to do so. Do you have consciences?
  • commented 2015-10-06 15:06:19 +0100
    Well said James Roberts. Generation Rent and particularly Foxwatcher seem to live a utopian pink cloud. Fact: Without the PRS many tenants would be homeless. Fact: Housing Associations and Councils account for over 50% of all evictions through the Courts be it S21 or for rent arrears . Fact: The majority of PRS landlords want to keep their tenants for as long as possible and often do not raise rent for many years, unlike the whole of the Social sector who apply rent increases year on year. Fact: There is only a minority of ‘Rogue’ landlords (less than 5% of the whole market) who do not abide by the rules and never will. Fact: There are as many if not more bad tenants than there are bad landlords. Fact: Deposit disputes which go to arbitration with any of the schemes account for less than 1% of all the deposits held, and finally: if you believe rent controls will help to improve the standard of housing then you are deluded.
  • commented 2015-10-06 14:44:56 +0100
    Foxwatcher hasn’t got a clue. They presumably style themselves as fair and intelligent but claim tax rates in excess of total earnings are ‘fair and appropriate’ then fails to spot the irony in landlords selling properties and evicting tenants who would otherwise have a long-term home. What a turnip. You should know that no professional landlords want to do this, and that many professional working tenants do not WANT to buy their own home. How do you account for that, you genius?

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Does your MP support a ban on letting fees?

Go straight to the campaign page

We have been banging on about banning letting fees for more than two years now. The case against them keeps getting stronger.

The latest evidence is from the English Housing Survey, which revealed in July that up to 69% of tenants living in unsatisfactory homes are discouraged from moving out because of the cost of agent fees. It also suggests the scam is worth around £115m a year.* 

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The decline of ownership, and meaningless means

A version of this article appeared on Inside Housing.

Last Tuesday, the Resolution Foundation dominated the headlines and airwaves with its report into levels of home ownership. Using figures from the Labour Force Survey, their big finding was that Greater Manchester saw the biggest fall in owner occupation from its peak at the turn of the century. It was a pattern seen across the north.

It’s no shock that the housing crisis is gripping the whole country. Our analysis of the 2011 census in 2014 found that ownership levels were already dropping in major urban areas. These figures are a bit more up to date.

While London and the South East have the most insane house prices, buying a home anywhere has become more difficult. This is because wages haven’t risen by much, and more people are in insecure employment, so it’s harder to save and to qualify for a mortgage. House prices became uncoupled from wages before the credit crunch, and didn’t revert to affordable levels after it.

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New developments in London require a relentless focus on affordability - nothing less will do

For the rest of the summer, London politics is formally in recess. Yet, the city keeps on moving and the Mayor has been publicly engaged with the housing elements of a number of high-profile developments.

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Got opinions about renting? We want them

As part of our work, we want to make sure that we're doing the best we can for renters, and a big part of that is understanding your experiences and hopes for the future. 

The housing crisis is such a complex beast that there are a range of views about how to fix it - and we'd like to know what yours are too.

That's why we are running a survey until mid-August. 

 

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Vent your rent, to music

If, like me, you wish this generation had its own Joe Strummer or Woody Guthrie, writing protest songs about the social challenges of the day - i.e. bad housing* - well, you're in luck. A new choir of private renters in London, called Section 21, is being announced this Saturday at Royal Festival Hall in London. 

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Enjoy the summer - but come back ready to end the London housing crisis

As is so often the case in the week before politicians break for the summer, we’ve had a raft of announcements, predictions and indicators in the last week – including a number of focused reports today from English Housing Survey data.

Coupled with announcements made at yesterday’s Mayoral Question Time (the last until September), private renters in London have a diagnosis and some solutions to ponder over the summer.

But equally, it is hoped that these reports will have brought added impetus to plans being written by the housing team at City Hall, ready to hit the ground running after the summer. 

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Want your letting fees back?

Michael Green is the founder of CaseHub. 

Over the past six months, I have been working with some of the country’s leading barristers to put together a lawsuit that proves how most letting fees in England and Wales are unlawful.

The good news is that they agree.

We now need to take that case to court. The good news is that if it wins, renters will be entitled to get their letting fees back, and in future some of them might be stopped entirely. 

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New PM, new diagnosis of the housing crisis

Before she was fast-tracked to 10 Downing St - in one of many dramatic twists in recent weeks - Theresa May gave us a glimpse of how her housing policy might differ from David Cameron's.

Launching her leadership campaign in Birmingham on Monday, May went further than Cameron has ever done in describing the the damage that house price inflation causes:

"...unless we deal with the housing deficit, we will see house prices keep on rising. Young people will find it even harder to afford their own home. The divide between those who inherit wealth and those who don’t will become more pronounced. And more and more of the country’s money will go into expensive housing instead of more productive investments that generate more economic growth." 

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Open letter from Butterfields tenants: 'We do not intend to give up our homes without fighting'

Private tenants on the Butterfields Estate in London's Waltham Forest are facing evictions from affordable homes they have lived in for years, after they were sold on without their knowledge. Previously owned by a charitable trust that ensured tenancies were secure and affordable, the two streets of homes were bought up by a private business (BE17Ltd) at the start of this year.

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Housing emergency drives 'blue light' workers out of London

There have been a huge number of articles written in the last fortnight about the future of Britain, with many focused on the potential effects on London’s economy of the country leaving the EU.

What must not be lost in these debates, though, is the focus on the structural problems that the city faced before the referendum. One of the most fundamental in recent years has been the fact that London’s housing crisis has forced many professionals out of the city.

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