GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:20:25 +0100
    I think you’re completely right Doreen. Council houses should not be sold off and if they are they most certainly shouldn’t be with obscene discounts. I’m afraid you’re right that they may well end up with private landlords, well that would have potentially been the case without this limitation on mortgage interest relief. However where we will disagree to a small extent is to the depth of youngsters not being able to afford a house. Most definitely the case with many and actually I didn’t buy my first one till I was nearly 30, BUT many youngsters want the latest iphone, cars, tablets, and all the other trinkets of the modern world. I didn’t have any of those and boy did I save. That is not what most of the youngsters do now, instead they blow their money on all these things and foreign holidays. If youngsters saved more they’d be surprised just what they could afford.
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:03:20 +0100
    My parents’ generation were “renters”. Albeit they were lucky to have a great “council owned” property. My generation were the ones who “owned” their homes. Today, we have gone back to the 40s and more people are having to rent. There are good landlords and some not so good. Buying “to let” is a growth market. To equal up the market there should be more “council” and “social” houses built. Affordable rents and sound landlords. Sadly, much of the “council” stock was sold off in the 80/90s and today it appears that even “social” housing will be sold off. Many of these hands will end up in the hands of private landlords.
  • commented 2015-10-06 18:58:25 +0100
    As Stephen Tunney said Foxwatcher, you crave for Utopia. However I agree that social housing should be provided by the State, but alas it isn’t. The State haven’t put any real effort into building for the last 30 years so where would you have all these men, women and children live??? I only have one HB tenant and she’s not my best by any means, but it seems you’ll be pleased to know that she’ll be the first to go, along with her children. Gosh that must make you happy! As for taking homes from first time buyers there has been no study of this done by anyone so prove what you say has any real value. Certainly I have purchased no houses a FTB would want as they’re all too large and some were on the market for literally years. I bought when others would not and I’ve made properties fit for habitation again. Instead of jealousy clouding your judgement actually talk with real-life landlords that have given people somewhere to live that would otherwise have none and on low rents too. Now the days of low rents will go. Also you bang on about us owning houses that the State should own. Let’s go the whole hog then, let’s have the State own our food shops too, after all it’s another basic human need. Let’s have them own M&S, TopShop and all the other clothes retailers as well as clothes are another basic human need. Let’s build that Utopia Foxwatcher! Let’s join George O as the builders of the nation! Oh sorry, this is the real world isn’t it.
  • commented 2015-10-06 17:49:58 +0100
    Private landlords need to think of someone other than themselves and their fat bank accounts. There is indeed a place for rental accommodation for many good reasons. But these should be owned by properly regulated Housing Associations, local councils, universities or similar responsible organisations, so that profits, both from rental income and from capital appreciation are used for the good of these organisations. They should not be owned by private individuals getting tax breaks on mortgage interest, repairs, profits and all the rest, borrowing obscene amounts of money with little or no checks such as those now faced by owner occupiers and buying up all the cheaper properties which would otherwise be targets for first time owner occupier buyers. Because of this, those who desperately want to buy but cannot because of you parasites, have to rent, as well as those who choose to do so for perfectly valid reasons. This is not about good or bad landlords, it’s about removing the aspiration to buy from a whole generation who want to do so. Do you have consciences?
  • commented 2015-10-06 15:06:19 +0100
    Well said James Roberts. Generation Rent and particularly Foxwatcher seem to live a utopian pink cloud. Fact: Without the PRS many tenants would be homeless. Fact: Housing Associations and Councils account for over 50% of all evictions through the Courts be it S21 or for rent arrears . Fact: The majority of PRS landlords want to keep their tenants for as long as possible and often do not raise rent for many years, unlike the whole of the Social sector who apply rent increases year on year. Fact: There is only a minority of ‘Rogue’ landlords (less than 5% of the whole market) who do not abide by the rules and never will. Fact: There are as many if not more bad tenants than there are bad landlords. Fact: Deposit disputes which go to arbitration with any of the schemes account for less than 1% of all the deposits held, and finally: if you believe rent controls will help to improve the standard of housing then you are deluded.
  • commented 2015-10-06 14:44:56 +0100
    Foxwatcher hasn’t got a clue. They presumably style themselves as fair and intelligent but claim tax rates in excess of total earnings are ‘fair and appropriate’ then fails to spot the irony in landlords selling properties and evicting tenants who would otherwise have a long-term home. What a turnip. You should know that no professional landlords want to do this, and that many professional working tenants do not WANT to buy their own home. How do you account for that, you genius?

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Property industry tries to block government's best housing policy

With a new Prime Minister and a new Chancellor heavily modifying their predecessors’ policies on the deficit, “affordable” housing and schools, the property industry is hopeful that the government will pursue similar revisionism on its landlord tax policy.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors this week called on the government to scrap the stamp duty surcharge on buy-to-let and second homes, while landlords have been in the High Court to challenge the withdrawal of mortgage interest tax relief for landlords paying higher rate income tax.

We’ve just learned that there will not be a judicial review of the government’s policy.

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Landlords and mortgages: what do we know?

Whenever you propose reform of private renting, the landlord lobby always says no, because "landlords couldn't afford it". Whether it's asking landlords to cover the cost of letting agent fees, to apply for a licence, to charge controlled rents, or to pay tax on their loans, we're asked to believe that they can't afford it. Then they threaten to raise rents - as if rents haven't already been outpacing inflation since the end of the recession.

This claim assumes that landlords are already paying large amounts of their revenue out again in costs. Some of them are, but we point out that the majority are not, because they don't have a mortgage.

For example, an interest-only mortgage of £150,000 at 4% costs £6000 a year. Rent on the £200,000 property bought with that mortgage might get you £10,000. Two thirds of private rented properties have no mortgage, and thus have significantly lower costs and capacity to absorb new regulatory requirements.

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Don't be fooled: Help to Buy is still dangerous

Yesterday, the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, confirmed that the Help to Buy Mortgage Guarantee scheme would wind up at the end of the year. This was arguably the more controversial of the two Help to Buy schemes announced in the 2013 Budget, but it was originally meant to last only 3 years. And with it gone, we're still left with a Help to Buy loan scheme that is highly counterproductive to any efforts to fix the housing crisis.

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The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 1 – rent levels)

During his recent visit to New York City, the Mayor of London took the opportunity to announce one of his key pre-election pledges for the private rented sector, the London Living Rent.

Doing so while overseas was both surprising and interesting and his visit to New York highlighted the challenges facing the Mayors of both cities.

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London's turning - Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor

Today Generation Rent publishes 'London's Turning: Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor', our call on Sadiq Khan to act rapidly and boldly in his response to the capital's housing crisis.

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London's housing costs are driving families away

Today we have called on the Mayor of London to adopt a set of policies that will speed up his efforts to end the capital’s housing crisis.

To remind him what’s at stake, we have uncovered another startling trend that is hurting the city and its people.

Every year the Office for National Statistics releases figures on internal migration – how many people move from one part of the UK to another – and people are moving out of London at an alarming rate.  

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Looking for cheap rent in London? Just become an artist then

Proposals this week to implement cheap rents for London's artists show how the the city's housing crisis makes an absurdity of good intentions, and indicates why a closer link to universality rather than targeting is needed to make renting affordable again in the capital.

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Making overseas investment work for Londoners

The issue of foreign investors pumping money into the London property market has once again been raised by last night’s BBC report on a rise in overseas investment in the outer London boroughs, and how this provides competition for first-time buyers.

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Private renters are Londoners too…

As Sadiq Khan announced the membership of his new Homes for Londoners board last week, the private rented sector was conspicuous by its absence. Despite close to one third of Londoners privately renting, the new body has not yet made provision for either tenants’ voices to be heard, nor for a clear focus on the PRS to be part of HfL’s work.

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Does your MP support a ban on letting fees?

Go straight to the campaign page

We have been banging on about banning letting fees for more than two years now. The case against them keeps getting stronger.

The latest evidence is from the English Housing Survey, which revealed in July that up to 69% of tenants living in unsatisfactory homes are discouraged from moving out because of the cost of agent fees. It also suggests the scam is worth around £115m a year.* 

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