GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-06 20:40:04 +0100
    James McKindley’s 19:09 shows just how blinkered buy to let owners are. “There’s no study, so what you say can’t be true”. I’ve seen it with my own eyes in my locality and elsewhere many times, James. Recently, a private house came on the market. The first day of viewing brought 18 people. 17 of these were prospective buy to let buyers, with guaranteed mortgages. The 18th, who wanted to buy his first home, stood no chance, so had to go back to his rented place, lining his landlord’s pocket even more. There are many other examples, so stop denying what is plain common sense. FYI, if rental properties were owned as I’d described earlier, the profits made by those organisations could and should be put straight back into building more properties, to help with the issues on the lack of building over the last 30 years. I agree with much of what Doreen says on this subject. James, you need to stop being completely selfish, stop checking your bank account every five minutes, stop having so many foreign holidays and weekends away, sell the spare 4×4 and all the other trappings of your pampered life. Sell a couple of your cheaper places at cost price to young families desperate to own their place, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll begin to do something with your life for someone else. This is a bigger subject that it’s possible to discuss here, but just think of the consequences on the younger generation of your activities, which are designed solely to make your life more comfortable for little work,
  • commented 2015-10-06 20:20:37 +0100
    This is nothing new. I would love to go back to the 60s. This was when you saved up a deposit and went along to you friendly Building Society to secure a loan. All that was need was proof that you were in work. These days are gone. I live near Ashford, Kent. In that area there is much new building going on. One man bought up over 100 properties to let out.
  • commented 2015-10-06 20:13:26 +0100
    Sadly, under the Thatcher government the bulk of council houses were sold off. Many well below the market value. As I travel around the country the estates I once knew as “council” housing are now in private hands. There will always be those not in a position to “buy” and yet those houses sold off have not been replaced. Today, the need is as much as it was after the 2nd WW.
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:33:02 +0100
    No arguments from me there Doreen.

    On a different note this has just been flagged up to me by a friend. Well worth reading. http://johnredwoodsdiary.com/2015/09/23/why-rent-controls-do-not-work/
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:23:28 +0100
    Let us not confuse “council” housing with “social” housing. Local Councils build council houses. Social housing is provided by Social Housing groups. The earliest on record re “social” housing was the Peabody Trust. Peabody was a wealthy American and a friend of Charles Dickens. On a visit to London he was appalled at the dreadful conditions Londoners were living in and set up a “Trust” to build sound, decent homes for the people of London. His “trust” providing decent homes still continues today. There are many other Housing Associations today which provide decent living accommodation for many at affordable rents. The government, I believe, has no right to demand they “sell off” their stock. After, all providing decent affordable homes is what they exist for.
  • commented 2015-10-06 19:20:25 +0100
    I think you’re completely right Doreen. Council houses should not be sold off and if they are they most certainly shouldn’t be with obscene discounts. I’m afraid you’re right that they may well end up with private landlords, well that would have potentially been the case without this limitation on mortgage interest relief. However where we will disagree to a small extent is to the depth of youngsters not being able to afford a house. Most definitely the case with many and actually I didn’t buy my first one till I was nearly 30, BUT many youngsters want the latest iphone, cars, tablets, and all the other trinkets of the modern world. I didn’t have any of those and boy did I save. That is not what most of the youngsters do now, instead they blow their money on all these things and foreign holidays. If youngsters saved more they’d be surprised just what they could afford.

Have something to voice?

Please check your e-mail for a link to activate your account.

Blog

Home ownership at 30-year low

Just 62.9% of England's population owns their home - the lowest proportion since 1985. And the private rented population now stands at 4.5m households, up on last year and bigger than in 1961, when slum landlords like Peter Rachman were making tenants' lives a misery.

These are the big findings of the English Housing Survey Headline Report, the first of two releases of the government-commissioned survey for 2015-16. 

At this rate, there will be more private renters than mortgage holders in just five years' time. It's already the largest tenure in London.

Projection.png

Read more

Brighton and Bournemouth letting fees - all in one place

Even though the government has promised to ban letting fees, our crowdsourced research project at lettingfees.co.uk continues to build up a picture of renter exploitation around the country. Renters in Bournemouth and Brighton & Hove now have an online comparison of letting fees in their area, which will help them avoid the rogues who are either charging excessive fees or just not publishing theirs.

Read more

Lessons from Germany: tenant power in the rental market

Last month the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) released its report “Lessons from Germany: Tenant power in the rental market”. It examines the relative strength of protection for German renters, and how these benefits might be brought across to England.

Read more

Making housing about immigration continues to be a toxic mix

Back in late 2015, when the details about making landlords check the immigration status of prospective tenants was being debated in parliament, housing and migrant groups repeatedly warned government that this would lead to discrimination, and push vulnerable renters into precarious and hidden housing.

Today a new report from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI) on the 'Right to Rent' scheme confirms that warning, with shocking findings of non-British and non-white renters finding it more difficult to access a new tenancy.

Read more

Government consults on banning orders - renters respond

We have put in our response to the government’s consultation on banning orders – the new mechanism to prevent criminals from operating in the rental market. That’s right, they aren’t banned already.

The government has asked what types of offences should be banworthy, and set a deadline of midnight tonight.

We asked our supporters for their experiences earlier in the week, dozens of you responded, and the feedback has helped shape our response to the government.

Read more

Housing White Paper: where do we stand now?

Well, the Housing White Paper was a massive disappointment. After an exciting glimpse on Sunday of moves to "incentivise" longer tenancies, on Tuesday it became clear that those incentives were existing government subsidies for companies building new homes. Number of beneficiaries: 80,322 (not counting the companies who would have offered longer tenancies anyway).

For the 4.3 million households in existing properties? The vague undertaking to "consider what more we can do to support families already renting privately, while encouraging continued investment in the sector." Which gives little hope to people who don't live with their family and a lot of hope to property speculators.

Read more

Housing White Paper: Our immediate reaction

Commenting on the Housing White Paper, Dan Wilson Craw, Director of Generation Rent, said:

“Sajid Javid has the right analysis about the plight of renters, but his White Paper has failed to offer us anything of substance.

Read more

Removing criminals from the housing market

Although the 2016 Housing and Planning Act paved the way for the mass sell-off of council houses, eroded security for social tenants and watered down the affordability of new homes, it also made it possible to ban criminals from letting out properties, with new Banning Orders. 

As we await the Housing White Paper to see how far the government will go to improve private renting further - and how much it will atone for the damage it caused to social housing - we are drafting our feedback on how Banning Orders will work. 

Read more

Are landlord incentives the answer to tenant insecurity?

Today's Observer declares that the "home-owning democracy", that elusive vision beloved of the Conservatives since Thatcher, is finished. 

Obs_0502.jpg 

Ahead of next week's Housing White Paper, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid says, "We understand people are living longer in private rented accommodation", which is the closest the government has come to admitting that their policies to help first-time buyers can only go so far. 

Read more

Housing White Paper: could Starter Homes be genuinely affordable?

As the publication date for the government's Housing White Paper approaches, we and groups across the the housing world are hoping for an announcement that will signal a 'whole new mindset', as the Secretary of State has promised.

One item that will be included is confirmation of how the government's long-running Starter Homes policy will work - and the detail will tell us how far it will go towards slowing the affordability crisis for first-time buyers. This is the government's flagship policy that was pitched as "turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy".

Read more

Twitter