GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-02-07 13:10:42 +0000
    You clearly have not read that blog post FW. The reason that so many new-builds are sold to landlords is that they stump up the deposits well in advance of completion, often before the builders break ground. If you want to go along and do that then the developer will be keen to take your cash. So go do it! However the issue is that you will be highly unlikely to have a mortgage in place so you are a risk. The developer wants to build houses and he needs the deposits to give him cashflow, so he has a dilemma. Will he take your deposit knowing that you may not be able to complete? Well possibly, go try it.

    Interesting that you think, in essence there should be no private investment, which would take us back to the 80s and where we started struggling to build houses. You do understand that’s what your suggesting don’t you.

    And of course the builders would not be happy at all, nor would any shareholders they may have and nor would all the other aspiring home buyers that see output spiral downwards.

    I would be the first to agree that we need more social housing but again if you look at the output graphs on that, the rot started 30 years ago. But you want all landlords to be social ones that will offer some sort show homes it would seem, and with extraordinary levels of service. I can promise you that is not what they do in housing associations and nor will the big rental villages that are on the cards. They’re companies that just want to maximise profits, and that is what their shareholders want.

    So are you also proposing that supermarkets and clothes shops are all run by the Government too? After all they’re basic human needs?

    FW, I’ve tried to help you understand the issue is much bigger than you buying a house by directing you to informative links, but you’re clearly not reading them. Unless you do and can produce proper cohesive arguments then you do nothing for your cause. Offering your Utopian world might be something you want to get to one day but it’s not a plan to solve the housing crisis or house all our immigrants that cannot get mortgages. Many more of them will probably be headed for our shores soon, so with the attack on the PRS where will they live? Those landlords that will likely be selling up are the ones that house HB tenants. Indeed I know landlords that are being approached by councils to take refugees and they’re saying NO. What is your instant solution because that is what is needed, not something that might be achievable in 20 or 30 years.
  • commented 2016-02-07 13:06:12 +0000
    I’ve posted previously here about what happened to my daughter and her partner renting from a private buy-to-let landlord. As a model tenant of 5 years – a fact acknowledged by the landlord – she had paid her rent on time every month without default, kept the property in good condition and was a part of a small village community. Feeling settled and happy she looked forward to starting a family. While pregnant, however, she received a notice for possession from the landlord. Her landlord then lied to the council saying that he was living in the house my daughter had lived in for 5 years. The local council advised my daughter and her partner to stay put in the property and not to leave until the landlord had obtained a court order. She had no option because she had nowhere else to go. The landlord then gave false information to the court in order to speed up the eviction. The stress of all this took its toll on my daughter’s health. She was then advised she would qualify for a house owned by a housing association in their area only because she was pregnant. The landlord then sold the property to an estate agent for a handsome profit.
  • commented 2016-02-07 13:00:28 +0000
    James M, your excitement is overcoming your common sense. I suggest you look back and remain yourself of exactly what I’ve said in past posts. As far as the example of “one particular day” goes, how many do you want? And as for “sponging off Mummy and Daddy”, surely that is preferable to lining the pocket of some avaricious speculator who cares only for themself? And by the way, I DO know who Mark Carney is. I’m surprised you seem to know a few details about Rachman, but I guess these days, there’s all sorts of info readily available on the Web…
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:49:02 +0000
    It’s pretty simple, James, if you take a view without any personal gain issues. Rental properties are essential for the reason you suggest and many more. But they should be owned and managed by a non-profit making entity who puts ALL profits into building further housing, thus keeping the building trade going. Let’s call them the local council, but housing associations, charities, universities and governmental organisations will also fit, along with many other suchorganisations. I appreciate that you and other private landlords say that Councils etc. are poor in some respects. I’m not arguing with this, but there are also very poor private landlords, I’m sure you’ll agree. There should be an empowered regulatory body, with teeth, in place to ensure that all landlords play fair.That’ll take time to set up, sure, but it will be FAIR and all profits will then go to improving the housing situation countrywide, not lining private individuals’ pockets/retirement plans. (Contact Messrs. G. Brown and T. Blair if you have issues with pension plan performance – I notice the Blair property portfolio is coming along nicely).

    As to buy to let landlords buying all new builds, I’ve seen it with my own eyes. As an example, there is another new development going up in my area now. I registered an interest as a potential buyer, and asked the developer whether there would be any for owner occupiers, or if they were going to the buy to let market. They told me they expected most/all to go to private landlords. This is not the first time that’s happened, and in many different areas. Most potential first time buyers would be only too happy to wait as long as it took to get their own bricks and mortar. If developers were not allowed to sell off plan (another argument for a different forum), predatory landlords would not have the time to wait, especially as many of them need to regularly increase their debt to service their empires. So you own argument in that field defeats you.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:43:05 +0000
    And if you still think the Chancellor is your friend and isn’t just trying to get the coffers full then read this http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/feb/06/pay-stay-rules-families-council-homes-private-sector-rent/. \What do you think rents will do in the PRS as these people will be forced from their homes.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:39:09 +0000
    No FW you are not offering a solution. There are an increasing number of immigrants in this country, do you comprehend that? They cannot buy houses so where would you have them live? The issue is not all about you and what you want. It’s about housing 65 million people when we have no proper building plan. So you want BTL to end, what’s the solution to housing all these people please? You might argue that there should be more social housing and I’d agree with you but there isn’t! And social housing building has been in decline since the 80s. Is that wrong? Yes I think it is but that’s where we are with things. Councils have been pushing their housing responsibilities out to the private sector more and more, as indeed they have with so many other services.

    You’ve been offered statistics and proposals but all you do is insult, which is why I think you deserve some of it back.

    Your ‘solution’ is to stop BTL overnight but that is a solution that in your own mind is going to help you, not anyone else. It’s all about me, me, me in your book. So come on then, where is your solution to housing all the immigrants and where is your solution for building more houses? You certainly haven’t offered one so far. And if you remove private investment from the industry then things just get worse, though probably not in the Utopian land you’ve dreamed up.

    You come out with more rubbish about Rachman but you know nothing about the accommodation I offer. Your narrow minded approach is indicative of ignorance, which of course you displayed much earlier when you went on about ‘guaranteed mortgages’ which only exist in your head.

    In the same earlier posts you admitted to distorting facts about numbers of viewers on a property being disproportionate of FTB to landlords, but then later said you were only talking about one particular day.

    You keep on about me being worried about my income and cash cow drying up. Well my old son you couldn’t be further from the truth. Like I have repeatedly told you I have always kept my rents low but now your super hero is forcing me to put them up, so the tenants are going to pay George what he wants and that was part of his plan anyway. Indeed I see great buying opportunities ahead.

    The headline grabbers of 500,000 properties being sold are I think, greatly exaggerated but we’ll see. Mark Carney (in case you don’t know who he is, he’s the Governor of the Bank of England) has states all along that that is one of his biggest concerns, and now George is trying to make it happen. If it does happen and prices tumble you can watch the building industry shut down,which will have a knock-on effect for generations. The country is already teetering on another recession and that could be the tipping point. I wonder if you’ll have a job then FW, even if you do manage to keep one, lenders probably won’t want to give you a mortgage.

    So my friend there is no desperation from where I stand but I completely believe that the tax grab is going to hurt millions of tenants and it’ll be the ones that are the poorest that will be hurt the most. Still you’re probably living with Mummy and Daddy and sponging of them so you’ll be alright.

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The return of 'fitness for human habitation' - will MPs finally give us this protection?

In ten days time, parliament breaks for the Christmas recess.

When they return in January, they will have an opportunity to support a simple change in law that would provide better protections for renters.

The question is, given that they have missed this opportunity before - will parliament do the right thing this time?

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Getting the best from Newham's renewed landlord licensing scheme

This week those campaigning for a better private rented sector received an early Christmas present with the announcement that the Communities Secretary had approved the majority of Newham's proposal for a renewed borough-wide landlord licensing scheme.

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Autumn Budget - an anticlimax for renters

The big news in today's Budget was the abolition of stamp duty for most first-time buyers. 

From today if you buy your first home you'll pay nothing to the government on the first £300,000 (unless it costs more than £500,000 and you need to be super-rich before you're in that territory).

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Life in the rental market: what the future holds for older renters

Most debates around housing focus on young adults, the drastic fall in their rate of home ownership and ways to boost the number of first time buyers.

Far less attention, however, is given to the vast numbers of renters who are already too old to get a mortgage and face a lifetime of renting instead. As more of them reach retirement age, the state will start paying more of their rent, and faces enormous costs unless it makes some fundamental changes to the housing market. Because politicians only operate with 5-year horizons, few are fretting about the implications of lifetime renting.

But we are, and today we publish a report co-authored with David Adler of Oxford University: Life in the Rental Market.

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A glimpse of Tory tenancy reform?

An intriguing exchange in the House of Commons this week may contain clues about the government's big forthcoming announcement of reforms to tenancies. 

During a debate on temporary accommodation, the backbench Conservative MP Bob Blackman said this:

The greatest cause of homelessness is the end of an assured shorthold tenancy. They usually run for six months and at the end of that period families often have to move. The solution is clear: we need longer tenancies and more security of tenure for families, but also assurances to landlords that they will get paid their rent and that the tenants will behave themselves in accordance with the contract they have signed. I ask the Minister to update us on where we are going with lengthening tenancies, which would dramatically reduce homelessness at a stroke. Perhaps we can do that.

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Insecure tenancies drag down quality of life

With home ownership unaffordable and council housing unavailable, private renters are living longer in a tenure that wasn't designed to provide long term homes. The constant threat of your landlord deciding to sell up or move back in means that you have none of the stability that a home is supposed to provide.

New polling from Survation, commissioned by us, exposes the impact this has on tenants' lives. It shows that private renters are more anxious about the security of their home and this is holding them back from investing time in their home and their local community. 

Survation.jpg

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Slowly, but surely, a letting fees ban is coming

Almost a year after Phillip Hammond announced the Government's intention to banning letting fees, we now have a draft bill before parliament.

Since that announcement, we have had a consultation on the ban, and of course a new government, but it has remained on the legislative agenda thanks to the concerted campaigning of renters across the country.

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Disrupting the market to help tenants

The internet has already shaken up the music industry, television, taxis and self-catering holidays. Investors are now looking for the next industry to disrupt with technology and property seems ripe for the picking. 

As the national voice of private renters, we agree that the property industry as it stands fails its consumers in too many ways, so things need to change. Even when we succeed in changing the law, like the forthcoming letting fees ban, we still need to ensure that it's implemented properly and the industry adapts in the right way. 

But we can't allow slick and revolutionary new services or initiatives to simply treat tenants as cash cows in the same way that many letting agents and landlords currently do. So this is what we think the market needs - and how the tenant should benefit.

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Lodgers need protection too

Where’s my deposit? It is no joking matter for nearly 300,000 tenants whose landlord has not protected their deposit.

This has left many out of pocket without a clue of how they will manage to raise another deposit - the average amount in London stands at £1040 for their next property.

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Landlord licensing works - yet the government is delaying renewal of the most successful scheme

Since the east London borough of Newham introduced mandatory borough-wide licensing of all private landlords in 2013, improvements in the sector have been indisputable. Criminal landlords are being driven out of the borough, standards and safety in the sector have improved and enforcement has dramatically increased.

Yet with the scheme due to expire on 31 December 2017, government is now more than four weeks overdue in making a decision on approval of a new, five-year scheme, to start in the new year.

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