GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-08 20:39:05 +0100
    Oh and perhaps you could explain why you are still telling us we are preventing FTBs when we’ve provided irrefutable proof to the contrary? Whilst we are on the subject, what happens to a FTB who is repossessed and wont be housed by the council? Or, for that matter, a council tenant thrown out for non-payment or bad behaviour? In your moronic utopia, they’d all get housed for free in an endless succession of waiting, vacant, social housing would they? But do you know where these people go in the real world, when nobody else wants them? Ah yes, thats right. To those willing to take a chance on them. The ONLY people willing to help them rebuild their lives. The private sector.
  • commented 2015-10-08 20:24:53 +0100
    Poxcatcher. You really are deeply embittered, aren’t you? ‘Cool and reasoned argument’ is incapable of emanating from you and you alone, as you have proven may times. You still haven’t answered a single rational point put by any of us, and sound as though you are putting your fingers in your ears and shouting ‘blah! blah! blah!’ at anyone who says anything vaguely sensible or realistic. What a depressing way to live. Somewhat hypocritically, you whine about being insulted whilst calling us parasites and leeches. Why have you not commented on any of my examples or points about how I have tried to help and encourage FTBs? How is offering my tenants cheap purchase prices to aid them, or backing my friend’s first mortgage, acts of a selfish and greedy individual? Also, you have yet to answer this one, simple, point: if I move to another city for a work placement – say 1 or 2 years – how am I to be accomodated? Is it the council I should call? Should I pay roughly double to triple the daily rate to stay in a Travel Inn? Must I be forced to buy a house where I am working? What if I dont WANT to do any of these things?? Please, please, please DO explain, because no one with a brain cell nor a shred of common sense can understand where or how you think I should live?! I’m waiting…
  • commented 2015-10-08 18:25:08 +0100
    Lost your capacity for cool reasoned argument when confronted with undeniable facts strongly stated, eh, Stephen? I’m not surprised…
  • commented 2015-10-08 15:15:43 +0100
    Foxwatcher Thank you for responding to my post and confirming my earlier comments by resorting to further histrionics and name calling. So sad!!!
  • commented 2015-10-08 14:13:34 +0100
    Stephen, I don’t work for GR, and actually have no particular interest one way or another in the welfare or living conditions of those who choose to rent. Neither do I much care if you are a “good” landlord or one who doesn’t care a jot, and who, like one of the James’, seems to be looking forward to evicting one of his less welcome tenants when he has to sell one of his properties because he is going to be taxed fairly. I have sympathy with those who are forced to rent, but that is not my argument here. I am totally and wholly against people such as yourself and the two James’ who buy property which would otherwise be in the purview of young first time owner/occupiers. BTL parasites can get fat mortgages with ease because they have other property against which they use as collateral, they then get the mortgages paid for by the rent of those who are forced (not those who choose) to rent from them, and eventually sell the property for an obscene profit on which they can then finance their lifestyle or retirement. I’m sure some may not actually cream off huge profits whilst they are renting, but the endgame is all about forcing the less fortunate to finance your eventual capital profit. It’s a disgrace that it is legal, and I hope that the small measures currently being taken, which seem to cause so much consternation, but will only result in rents being raised to cover BTL costs, are drastically enhanced so that Britain once more becomes somewhere people can aspire to own one property in which to live and raise their family, and aspire to leave it to their own kids. Get a conscience, and stop trying to justify your selfish actions as if you’re providing a service to others. If you hadn’t bought the houses from under them in the first place, there would be no necessity to provide this fictitious service, and organisations who use any profit to build more housing could fill the gap rather than profiteering leeches.
  • commented 2015-10-08 12:38:04 +0100
    Foxwatcher you have given no credible arguments to support your position. What arguments you have put forward are without foundation and have done nothing but damage any credibility Generation Rent had left after their chief jumped ship just before Nationwide pulled all it’s funding (FYI Nationwide are one of the biggest BTL mortgage providers).
    I’m not sure if you work for GR and think you are campaigning for tenants rights but you are not, your comments do nothing but damage the future of the very people you purport to be campaigning for.

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Blog

Save £404 when you move after fees ban

Tomorrow is the final chance to respond to the government's consultation on their proposals to ban letting fees.

Ahead of this we have published our latest research from lettingfees.co.uk, which features in today's Times (£), Guardian and i. We have also published an update to last year's report.

Our main findings are that the government's proposals will save the average tenants £404 when they move, and an average £117 every 6 or 12 months to renew the tenancy.

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3.4m private renters risk losing their vote

With one week until voter registration closes, we've estimated that more than three million private renters in England are at risk of losing their vote at the General Election.

1.8m private renters have moved home since the 2016 Referendum and must therefore register again. Private renters are typically on tenancy agreements of no longer than 12 months and are six times more likely to move in a given year than homeowners.

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Celebrating ingenuity in the property industry

The steam train. The vaccine. The television. The World Wide Web. The tenancy renewal fee.

What connects them all? Each one is an incredibly successful British invention.

Yes, we may no longer have the manufacturing prowess that once sustained all corners of the country, but a certain group of entrepreneurs have exerted their creative minds to produce the £250 photocopy, and are currently raking it in.

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One promise the Prime Minister must keep

Theresa May has broken her word. She ruled out a snap election five times, then called one.

Our question is: what other promises is she going to tear up?

The government is consulting now on proposals to ban letting fees, and the deadline of 2 June is a week before polling day.

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Proposed ban on letting fees unveiled

For four and a half months we've been waiting with bated breath for the government's proposals to ban fees, and today they were unveiled as the government finally launched its consultation.

The policy is no half-measure - tenants will not have to pay fees in connection with their tenancy outside of rent, refundable deposit, holding deposit and extra services they require during the course of the tenancy (e.g. replacing lost keys).

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Generation Rent wins prestigious campaigning award

Last night, Generation Rent was handed the Housing and Homelessness Award at the 2017 Sheila McKechnie Foundation awards in London.

The award was in recognition of our work in the past year to mobilise renters as a political force, which culminated in the government’s announcement of a ban on letting fees in November.

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Four new trustees help bolster the organisation

We are pleased to welcome four new trustees who have joined the Generation Rent board since the start of the year.

Daniel Bentley, Sean Cosgrove, Betsy Dillner and Hannah Williams bring with them decades of experience in political communications, financial management, movement building and business development.

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Housing Greater Manchester

When you mention the housing crisis, people tend to think of London and of campaign groups like Focus E15. There is good reason for this - the capital has experienced the worst excesses of the housing crisis, and the pushback there has been among the most dynamic in the country. Yet London is not alone in having a housing crisis, and in recent years the effects of a dysfunctional housing system have been making themselves felt in Greater Manchester.

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Minimum acceptable living standards in London - and how housing costs cut right through them

This week Trust for London, in conjunction with Loughborough University, published their latest report on a Minimum Income Standard (MIS) for London - with figures updated from their first report in 2015, and with a focus in this research on families.

The MIS compares costs between London and the rest of the UK to show the difference between the minimum needed for an acceptable standard of living - with that minimum based on a list of goods discussed and agreed upon by the public.

We can draw many conclusions from the report, and though it should surprise no one that the cost of housing is a major differential between London and the rest of the UK, the research shows that the rising cost of private rents in the lower end of the market stops a large number of households achieving the MIS.

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Rate your landlord and more on Marks Out Of Tenancy

Ben Yarrow is Founder of Marks Out Of TenancyFor more useful websites for renters, visit our resources page.

Ask anyone who’s renting, everyone’s got a story to share. Whether it’s good, bad or just plain ugly; every renter has had their own experience with a landlord or a letting agent that can give us insight into what can be expected as a potential tenant of theirs.    

Now, while it can be fun to wax lyrical about rental horror stories, we wanted to figure out how this exchange of experiences could be harnessed to the benefit of generation rent - so we created Marks out of Tenancy.

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