GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-08 18:25:08 +0100
    Lost your capacity for cool reasoned argument when confronted with undeniable facts strongly stated, eh, Stephen? I’m not surprised…
  • commented 2015-10-08 15:15:43 +0100
    Foxwatcher Thank you for responding to my post and confirming my earlier comments by resorting to further histrionics and name calling. So sad!!!
  • commented 2015-10-08 14:13:34 +0100
    Stephen, I don’t work for GR, and actually have no particular interest one way or another in the welfare or living conditions of those who choose to rent. Neither do I much care if you are a “good” landlord or one who doesn’t care a jot, and who, like one of the James’, seems to be looking forward to evicting one of his less welcome tenants when he has to sell one of his properties because he is going to be taxed fairly. I have sympathy with those who are forced to rent, but that is not my argument here. I am totally and wholly against people such as yourself and the two James’ who buy property which would otherwise be in the purview of young first time owner/occupiers. BTL parasites can get fat mortgages with ease because they have other property against which they use as collateral, they then get the mortgages paid for by the rent of those who are forced (not those who choose) to rent from them, and eventually sell the property for an obscene profit on which they can then finance their lifestyle or retirement. I’m sure some may not actually cream off huge profits whilst they are renting, but the endgame is all about forcing the less fortunate to finance your eventual capital profit. It’s a disgrace that it is legal, and I hope that the small measures currently being taken, which seem to cause so much consternation, but will only result in rents being raised to cover BTL costs, are drastically enhanced so that Britain once more becomes somewhere people can aspire to own one property in which to live and raise their family, and aspire to leave it to their own kids. Get a conscience, and stop trying to justify your selfish actions as if you’re providing a service to others. If you hadn’t bought the houses from under them in the first place, there would be no necessity to provide this fictitious service, and organisations who use any profit to build more housing could fill the gap rather than profiteering leeches.
  • commented 2015-10-08 12:38:04 +0100
    Foxwatcher you have given no credible arguments to support your position. What arguments you have put forward are without foundation and have done nothing but damage any credibility Generation Rent had left after their chief jumped ship just before Nationwide pulled all it’s funding (FYI Nationwide are one of the biggest BTL mortgage providers).
    I’m not sure if you work for GR and think you are campaigning for tenants rights but you are not, your comments do nothing but damage the future of the very people you purport to be campaigning for.
  • commented 2015-10-07 18:58:08 +0100
    That’s fine Foxwatcher but I do find it interesting that you take offence at being called a liar (your word not mine) when you accused me of offering false data in the example I have submitted to GR. Clearly double standards I’d suggest. I’ve even offered to meet with you and show you how the finance works but you’ve not even shown the slightest interest. You keep going on about the greed of landlords and refuse to actually look at the numbers. You have a bee in your bonnet about landlords supplying accommodation to those that want it but don’t have an issue with the supply of other essential needs. More double standards. Open your mind to these points and open your mind to the true finances of the industry, and lastly definitely open your mind to what the tax change will do because whatever you think, it’ll make things so much worse for FTB’s for many years to come.
  • commented 2015-10-07 18:44:55 +0100
    Just for the avoidance of doubt, all three of you are sticking your heads in the sand about the consequences of you, and all other private landlords, buying up entry level properties. You are hiding behind any convenient fabricated argument, but plain common sense says I’m right, never mind my own personal observations and experiences. I had friends who also have “property portfolios”. They also hide behind pathetic excuses and don’t use common sense, which is why they are ex friends. I don’t mind trying to persuade people in denial such as yourselves, but am not going to be called a liar or sworn at by the 2 James’. This is why I am not continuing this discussion, not because you have in any way persuaded me. You are selfish, greedy grasping people, even if you are sensible enough to realise that being “good” landlords means your cash cows are easier to maintain. I shall not be responding to any further posts on this subject at this time.

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Blog

Government consults on banning orders - renters respond

We have put in our response to the government’s consultation on banning orders – the new mechanism to prevent criminals from operating in the rental market. That’s right, they aren’t banned already.

The government has asked what types of offences should be banworthy, and set a deadline of midnight tonight.

We asked our supporters for their experiences earlier in the week, dozens of you responded, and the feedback has helped shape our response to the government.

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Housing White Paper: where do we stand now?

Well, the Housing White Paper was a massive disappointment. After an exciting glimpse on Sunday of moves to "incentivise" longer tenancies, on Tuesday it became clear that those incentives were existing government subsidies for companies building new homes. Number of beneficiaries: 80,322 (not counting the companies who would have offered longer tenancies anyway).

For the 4.3 million households in existing properties? The vague undertaking to "consider what more we can do to support families already renting privately, while encouraging continued investment in the sector." Which gives little hope to people who don't live with their family and a lot of hope to property speculators.

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Housing White Paper: Our immediate reaction

Commenting on the Housing White Paper, Dan Wilson Craw, Director of Generation Rent, said:

“Sajid Javid has the right analysis about the plight of renters, but his White Paper has failed to offer us anything of substance.

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Removing criminals from the housing market

Although the 2016 Housing and Planning Act paved the way for the mass sell-off of council houses, eroded security for social tenants and watered down the affordability of new homes, it also made it possible to ban criminals from letting out properties, with new Banning Orders. 

As we await the Housing White Paper to see how far the government will go to improve private renting further - and how much it will atone for the damage it caused to social housing - we are drafting our feedback on how Banning Orders will work. 

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Are landlord incentives the answer to tenant insecurity?

Today's Observer declares that the "home-owning democracy", that elusive vision beloved of the Conservatives since Thatcher, is finished. 

Obs_0502.jpg 

Ahead of next week's Housing White Paper, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid says, "We understand people are living longer in private rented accommodation", which is the closest the government has come to admitting that their policies to help first-time buyers can only go so far. 

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Housing White Paper: could Starter Homes be genuinely affordable?

As the publication date for the government's Housing White Paper approaches, we and groups across the the housing world are hoping for an announcement that will signal a 'whole new mindset', as the Secretary of State has promised.

One item that will be included is confirmation of how the government's long-running Starter Homes policy will work - and the detail will tell us how far it will go towards slowing the affordability crisis for first-time buyers. This is the government's flagship policy that was pitched as "turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy".

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Are banks behind your latest rent rise?

This morning, Mortgage Strategy magazine and the Daily Telegraph reported that Santander is requiring its buy-to-let borrowers to raise the rent on their tenants as high as possible.

The bank even demands that landlords get a valuation of the market rent every time the tenancy is up for renewal and then "take all steps to ensure that the review [with the tenant] takes place and leads to the maximum increase in the rent which can reasonably be achieved."

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Fuel poverty update: we can’t have any more delays in supporting renters in the coldest homes

Just before Christmas, as the weather got colder and government released its latest update on the fuel poverty statistics, there was still no news for private renters who need clarity about the detail of minimum energy efficiency standards in the PRS.

The statistics showed that one in five private rented households are officially fuel poor, and that the average ‘fuel poverty gap’ – the amount of money needed for a household to escape fuel poverty – is highest for private renters.

Despite these worrying trends, there is, in theory at least, some light at the end of the tunnel – but delays in implementing the policy need to be quickly remedied for that to be realised.

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Help lead Generation Rent - apply to join the board

Generation Rent would be nothing without the people who donate their money or time to the cause. We have a team of two full-time staff going into 2017, and we are ever more reliant on the generosity of our supporters.

The organisation is governed by a board of unpaid trustees, who support the team and enable us to devote as much of our energy to campaigning for renters' rights and building the wider movement.

With the need to develop the diversity of our funding, and new opportunities to make the most of, we are recruiting several new trustees who will help us do this.

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Changes at Generation Rent

Since its launch, Generation Rent has achieved a series of improvements to the lives of renters, including:

  • Outlawing of revenge evictions
  • Making landlords pay their fair share of tax
  • Stronger regulation of landlords and letting agents
  • A proposed ban on letting fees 

The growing renter population finally has a voice, but it needs to be much stronger.

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