GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-08-16 11:25:35 +0100
    Dear Generation Rent,
    I am a mother with a son in his late twenties who lives in London. He has been ripped off by agents, had to rent some appalling places, and unless I die soon has no chance of buying a place of his own. I am suggesting that you have a ‘old people in support of Generation Rent’ section. There are many older people who, like me, are very worried about the future for their children and who would be prepared to help, march and do whatever to get politicians to start taking this problem seriously.
    Sincerely
    C. A. Read
  • commented 2016-08-11 16:37:04 +0100
    In Germany they have already laws to protect tenants. They have tenant associations like, Mieterverein Köln or Mieterverein München. We had already to go against landlords twice and even though it lasted two years but at last we won. All that for 70€ a year. There is a law as well to regulate agency fees, which says the side who ordered the service is paying for it (these are business basics). We hope you could probably look up many things from them, as Germany has many decades experience in renting. Thanks
  • commented 2016-04-06 11:38:05 +0100
    Sheffield Residential – Agent. The accommodation was first class but complete nightmare trying to get deposit back. Needed documentary evidence of payment of all utility bills and council tax. Electricity company messed up account and Sheffield Residential would not accept this. After almost 12 months reluctantly accepted letters from all service providers. Then took a long while to refund deposit using excuses like “with our accounts”. Would never use them again
  • commented 2016-02-08 10:22:37 +0000
    Foxwatcher, if you are indeed one of those people constrained by the MMR then you have my every sympathy. It’s all very well saying we must control lending but if all it does is prevent perfectly capable people getting on the ladder then it’s a false policy that doesn’t work.

    My good wishes are genuine. Despite me being on the ‘wrong’ side of the fence, Im a huge believer in home ownership and the ability of the young to buy for themselves. I hope you find what you’re looking for. If it makes any difference, I spent 12 years around the 1990s saving for my first deposit – left home at 31! Not ideal I know but we’ve all been there – and that was before consumer BTL even existed! All the best. JR
  • commented 2016-02-07 22:44:34 +0000
    James R, we may indeed not agree on private landlords, but much of what you said in that last post I could have written myself. And your examples of friends with large deposits who can’t get mortgages on sensible properties in their area are ones I very much identify with, shall we say. It IS madness, as you say. I guess if there was a solution, it would’ve been identified and dealt with by now. I’m just trying to make my feelings known on one bit of it that does seem, to me, to have a theoretical solution, fraught with practical difficulties as they may be. Thanks for your best wishes. I appreciate them, and your understanding that there is another point of view here.
  • commented 2016-02-07 21:12:35 +0000
    Foxwatcher. Hmmmm, I’d be inclined to agree on the shared-ownership thing. It’s a very long way from perfect and the problems you mention are very real and widespread. I have some experience here. To what extent are you held back by the Mortgage Market Review? – a good friend of mine has a 50% deposit in a relatively cheap area of the country and still can’t get a loan! Madness. (Similarly, some very wealthy friends can’t get a loan either even though it’s for a small fraction of their cash worth – again, madness).

    We’ll clearly never agree on private renting. In a capitalist, ‘free’ society we pay for everything, even the essentials. The supermarkets, water companies, heating, fuel, even clothes – they all make money out of us, out of essentials, out of stuff many people can’t afford. I see your point on housing, but unless everything goes over to your profit-free utopia, it can’t work.

    Consider my local ‘caring, socialist’ council who charge £7/day to park at the railway station. Ok you don’t HAVE to drive to the station, but most people in reality DO HAVE to. It’s too difficult not to. For a space 12×8′ of plain Tarmac, you have to pay the equivalent of nearly FOUR TIMES as much as one of my fully-equipped and beautiful three bedroom houses. And you get a lot more use out of a house 24 hours a day than you do a square of Tarmac.

    The ‘expense’ is all relative and no one ever really provides anything unless there’s something in it for them. It’s just the way of the world. But if you’re home-hunting, I do wish you well.

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Blog

Fitness for Human Habitation: Another milestone in the long road to a decent private rented sector

In another sign of the growing importance of the renters' movement in the UK, government announced over the weekend that it would be supporting measured outlined in Karen Buck MP's upcoming private member's bill, which would allow private and social tenants to take legal action against their landlord where their home is not deemed 'fit for human habitation'.

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The return of 'fitness for human habitation' - will MPs finally give us this protection?

In ten days time, parliament breaks for the Christmas recess.

When they return in January, they will have an opportunity to support a simple change in law that would provide better protections for renters.

The question is, given that they have missed this opportunity before - will parliament do the right thing this time?

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Getting the best from Newham's renewed landlord licensing scheme

This week those campaigning for a better private rented sector received an early Christmas present with the announcement that the Communities Secretary had approved the majority of Newham's proposal for a renewed borough-wide landlord licensing scheme.

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Autumn Budget - an anticlimax for renters

The big news in today's Budget was the abolition of stamp duty for most first-time buyers. 

From today if you buy your first home you'll pay nothing to the government on the first £300,000 (unless it costs more than £500,000 and you need to be super-rich before you're in that territory).

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Life in the rental market: what the future holds for older renters

Most debates around housing focus on young adults, the drastic fall in their rate of home ownership and ways to boost the number of first time buyers.

Far less attention, however, is given to the vast numbers of renters who are already too old to get a mortgage and face a lifetime of renting instead. As more of them reach retirement age, the state will start paying more of their rent, and faces enormous costs unless it makes some fundamental changes to the housing market. Because politicians only operate with 5-year horizons, few are fretting about the implications of lifetime renting.

But we are, and today we publish a report co-authored with David Adler of Oxford University: Life in the Rental Market.

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A glimpse of Tory tenancy reform?

An intriguing exchange in the House of Commons this week may contain clues about the government's big forthcoming announcement of reforms to tenancies. 

During a debate on temporary accommodation, the backbench Conservative MP Bob Blackman said this:

The greatest cause of homelessness is the end of an assured shorthold tenancy. They usually run for six months and at the end of that period families often have to move. The solution is clear: we need longer tenancies and more security of tenure for families, but also assurances to landlords that they will get paid their rent and that the tenants will behave themselves in accordance with the contract they have signed. I ask the Minister to update us on where we are going with lengthening tenancies, which would dramatically reduce homelessness at a stroke. Perhaps we can do that.

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Insecure tenancies drag down quality of life

With home ownership unaffordable and council housing unavailable, private renters are living longer in a tenure that wasn't designed to provide long term homes. The constant threat of your landlord deciding to sell up or move back in means that you have none of the stability that a home is supposed to provide.

New polling from Survation, commissioned by us, exposes the impact this has on tenants' lives. It shows that private renters are more anxious about the security of their home and this is holding them back from investing time in their home and their local community. 

Survation.jpg

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Slowly, but surely, a letting fees ban is coming

Almost a year after Phillip Hammond announced the Government's intention to banning letting fees, we now have a draft bill before parliament.

Since that announcement, we have had a consultation on the ban, and of course a new government, but it has remained on the legislative agenda thanks to the concerted campaigning of renters across the country.

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Disrupting the market to help tenants

The internet has already shaken up the music industry, television, taxis and self-catering holidays. Investors are now looking for the next industry to disrupt with technology and property seems ripe for the picking. 

As the national voice of private renters, we agree that the property industry as it stands fails its consumers in too many ways, so things need to change. Even when we succeed in changing the law, like the forthcoming letting fees ban, we still need to ensure that it's implemented properly and the industry adapts in the right way. 

But we can't allow slick and revolutionary new services or initiatives to simply treat tenants as cash cows in the same way that many letting agents and landlords currently do. So this is what we think the market needs - and how the tenant should benefit.

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Lodgers need protection too

Where’s my deposit? It is no joking matter for nearly 300,000 tenants whose landlord has not protected their deposit.

This has left many out of pocket without a clue of how they will manage to raise another deposit - the average amount in London stands at £1040 for their next property.

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