GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-02-07 13:06:12 +0000
    I’ve posted previously here about what happened to my daughter and her partner renting from a private buy-to-let landlord. As a model tenant of 5 years – a fact acknowledged by the landlord – she had paid her rent on time every month without default, kept the property in good condition and was a part of a small village community. Feeling settled and happy she looked forward to starting a family. While pregnant, however, she received a notice for possession from the landlord. Her landlord then lied to the council saying that he was living in the house my daughter had lived in for 5 years. The local council advised my daughter and her partner to stay put in the property and not to leave until the landlord had obtained a court order. She had no option because she had nowhere else to go. The landlord then gave false information to the court in order to speed up the eviction. The stress of all this took its toll on my daughter’s health. She was then advised she would qualify for a house owned by a housing association in their area only because she was pregnant. The landlord then sold the property to an estate agent for a handsome profit.
  • commented 2016-02-07 13:00:28 +0000
    James M, your excitement is overcoming your common sense. I suggest you look back and remain yourself of exactly what I’ve said in past posts. As far as the example of “one particular day” goes, how many do you want? And as for “sponging off Mummy and Daddy”, surely that is preferable to lining the pocket of some avaricious speculator who cares only for themself? And by the way, I DO know who Mark Carney is. I’m surprised you seem to know a few details about Rachman, but I guess these days, there’s all sorts of info readily available on the Web…
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:49:02 +0000
    It’s pretty simple, James, if you take a view without any personal gain issues. Rental properties are essential for the reason you suggest and many more. But they should be owned and managed by a non-profit making entity who puts ALL profits into building further housing, thus keeping the building trade going. Let’s call them the local council, but housing associations, charities, universities and governmental organisations will also fit, along with many other suchorganisations. I appreciate that you and other private landlords say that Councils etc. are poor in some respects. I’m not arguing with this, but there are also very poor private landlords, I’m sure you’ll agree. There should be an empowered regulatory body, with teeth, in place to ensure that all landlords play fair.That’ll take time to set up, sure, but it will be FAIR and all profits will then go to improving the housing situation countrywide, not lining private individuals’ pockets/retirement plans. (Contact Messrs. G. Brown and T. Blair if you have issues with pension plan performance – I notice the Blair property portfolio is coming along nicely).

    As to buy to let landlords buying all new builds, I’ve seen it with my own eyes. As an example, there is another new development going up in my area now. I registered an interest as a potential buyer, and asked the developer whether there would be any for owner occupiers, or if they were going to the buy to let market. They told me they expected most/all to go to private landlords. This is not the first time that’s happened, and in many different areas. Most potential first time buyers would be only too happy to wait as long as it took to get their own bricks and mortar. If developers were not allowed to sell off plan (another argument for a different forum), predatory landlords would not have the time to wait, especially as many of them need to regularly increase their debt to service their empires. So you own argument in that field defeats you.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:43:05 +0000
    And if you still think the Chancellor is your friend and isn’t just trying to get the coffers full then read this http://www.theguardian.com/society/2016/feb/06/pay-stay-rules-families-council-homes-private-sector-rent/. \What do you think rents will do in the PRS as these people will be forced from their homes.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:39:09 +0000
    No FW you are not offering a solution. There are an increasing number of immigrants in this country, do you comprehend that? They cannot buy houses so where would you have them live? The issue is not all about you and what you want. It’s about housing 65 million people when we have no proper building plan. So you want BTL to end, what’s the solution to housing all these people please? You might argue that there should be more social housing and I’d agree with you but there isn’t! And social housing building has been in decline since the 80s. Is that wrong? Yes I think it is but that’s where we are with things. Councils have been pushing their housing responsibilities out to the private sector more and more, as indeed they have with so many other services.

    You’ve been offered statistics and proposals but all you do is insult, which is why I think you deserve some of it back.

    Your ‘solution’ is to stop BTL overnight but that is a solution that in your own mind is going to help you, not anyone else. It’s all about me, me, me in your book. So come on then, where is your solution to housing all the immigrants and where is your solution for building more houses? You certainly haven’t offered one so far. And if you remove private investment from the industry then things just get worse, though probably not in the Utopian land you’ve dreamed up.

    You come out with more rubbish about Rachman but you know nothing about the accommodation I offer. Your narrow minded approach is indicative of ignorance, which of course you displayed much earlier when you went on about ‘guaranteed mortgages’ which only exist in your head.

    In the same earlier posts you admitted to distorting facts about numbers of viewers on a property being disproportionate of FTB to landlords, but then later said you were only talking about one particular day.

    You keep on about me being worried about my income and cash cow drying up. Well my old son you couldn’t be further from the truth. Like I have repeatedly told you I have always kept my rents low but now your super hero is forcing me to put them up, so the tenants are going to pay George what he wants and that was part of his plan anyway. Indeed I see great buying opportunities ahead.

    The headline grabbers of 500,000 properties being sold are I think, greatly exaggerated but we’ll see. Mark Carney (in case you don’t know who he is, he’s the Governor of the Bank of England) has states all along that that is one of his biggest concerns, and now George is trying to make it happen. If it does happen and prices tumble you can watch the building industry shut down,which will have a knock-on effect for generations. The country is already teetering on another recession and that could be the tipping point. I wonder if you’ll have a job then FW, even if you do manage to keep one, lenders probably won’t want to give you a mortgage.

    So my friend there is no desperation from where I stand but I completely believe that the tax grab is going to hurt millions of tenants and it’ll be the ones that are the poorest that will be hurt the most. Still you’re probably living with Mummy and Daddy and sponging of them so you’ll be alright.
  • commented 2016-02-07 12:35:24 +0000
    I can’t believe the nonsense I read from landlords with vested interests on this site. The fact is that private landlords are greedy parasites who try to con us into believing they have the best interests of the poor at heart. They have been able to thrive in this so-called society of ours simply because this is the kind of behaviour that has been rewarded by governments that have not fulfilled their promises to provide housing that people can afford to buy.

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Blog

Making housing about immigration continues to be a toxic mix

Back in late 2015, when the details about making landlords check the immigration status of prospective tenants was being debated in parliament, housing and migrant groups repeatedly warned government that this would lead to discrimination, and push vulnerable renters into precarious and hidden housing.

Today a new report from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI) on the 'Right to Rent' scheme confirms that warning, with shocking findings of non-British and non-white renters finding it more difficult to access a new tenancy.

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Government consults on banning orders - renters respond

We have put in our response to the government’s consultation on banning orders – the new mechanism to prevent criminals from operating in the rental market. That’s right, they aren’t banned already.

The government has asked what types of offences should be banworthy, and set a deadline of midnight tonight.

We asked our supporters for their experiences earlier in the week, dozens of you responded, and the feedback has helped shape our response to the government.

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Housing White Paper: where do we stand now?

Well, the Housing White Paper was a massive disappointment. After an exciting glimpse on Sunday of moves to "incentivise" longer tenancies, on Tuesday it became clear that those incentives were existing government subsidies for companies building new homes. Number of beneficiaries: 80,322 (not counting the companies who would have offered longer tenancies anyway).

For the 4.3 million households in existing properties? The vague undertaking to "consider what more we can do to support families already renting privately, while encouraging continued investment in the sector." Which gives little hope to people who don't live with their family and a lot of hope to property speculators.

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Housing White Paper: Our immediate reaction

Commenting on the Housing White Paper, Dan Wilson Craw, Director of Generation Rent, said:

“Sajid Javid has the right analysis about the plight of renters, but his White Paper has failed to offer us anything of substance.

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Removing criminals from the housing market

Although the 2016 Housing and Planning Act paved the way for the mass sell-off of council houses, eroded security for social tenants and watered down the affordability of new homes, it also made it possible to ban criminals from letting out properties, with new Banning Orders. 

As we await the Housing White Paper to see how far the government will go to improve private renting further - and how much it will atone for the damage it caused to social housing - we are drafting our feedback on how Banning Orders will work. 

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Are landlord incentives the answer to tenant insecurity?

Today's Observer declares that the "home-owning democracy", that elusive vision beloved of the Conservatives since Thatcher, is finished. 

Obs_0502.jpg 

Ahead of next week's Housing White Paper, Communities Secretary Sajid Javid says, "We understand people are living longer in private rented accommodation", which is the closest the government has come to admitting that their policies to help first-time buyers can only go so far. 

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Housing White Paper: could Starter Homes be genuinely affordable?

As the publication date for the government's Housing White Paper approaches, we and groups across the the housing world are hoping for an announcement that will signal a 'whole new mindset', as the Secretary of State has promised.

One item that will be included is confirmation of how the government's long-running Starter Homes policy will work - and the detail will tell us how far it will go towards slowing the affordability crisis for first-time buyers. This is the government's flagship policy that was pitched as "turning Generation Rent into Generation Buy".

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Are banks behind your latest rent rise?

This morning, Mortgage Strategy magazine and the Daily Telegraph reported that Santander is requiring its buy-to-let borrowers to raise the rent on their tenants as high as possible.

The bank even demands that landlords get a valuation of the market rent every time the tenancy is up for renewal and then "take all steps to ensure that the review [with the tenant] takes place and leads to the maximum increase in the rent which can reasonably be achieved."

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Fuel poverty update: we can’t have any more delays in supporting renters in the coldest homes

Just before Christmas, as the weather got colder and government released its latest update on the fuel poverty statistics, there was still no news for private renters who need clarity about the detail of minimum energy efficiency standards in the PRS.

The statistics showed that one in five private rented households are officially fuel poor, and that the average ‘fuel poverty gap’ – the amount of money needed for a household to escape fuel poverty – is highest for private renters.

Despite these worrying trends, there is, in theory at least, some light at the end of the tunnel – but delays in implementing the policy need to be quickly remedied for that to be realised.

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Help lead Generation Rent - apply to join the board

Generation Rent would be nothing without the people who donate their money or time to the cause. We have a team of two full-time staff going into 2017, and we are ever more reliant on the generosity of our supporters.

The organisation is governed by a board of unpaid trustees, who support the team and enable us to devote as much of our energy to campaigning for renters' rights and building the wider movement.

With the need to develop the diversity of our funding, and new opportunities to make the most of, we are recruiting several new trustees who will help us do this.

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