GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2018-05-22 22:32:29 +0100
    Kevin Dray

    I don’t follow where you are getting from my comment that I am saying 1 is a greater number than 5.

    But you’re missing the point, it’s not about how fantastic some landlords are, or about how terrible some tenants are, or whether good landlords are something that is needed. I’m just trying to point out that in the landlord-tenant relationship, tenants currently seem to have most to lose and least protection. The fact that some landlords aren’t good landlords is good justification to increase those protections.

    From the landlord’s perspective, a bad tenant, who doesn’t pay rent and who damages the property can be evicted quite quickly. Insurance pays for the repairs, and I’ve seen many letting agents even advertise that they will cover the rent if the tenants disappear. The landlord may still have out of pocket costs for some things and see their premiums rise but at the end of the day all it is is a bit of a headache and a lost opportunity for some extra income.

    From the tenant’s perspective, a bad landlord can evict them with two month’s notice at any time for no reason at all. Two months may seem like a lot of notice but you try continuing without impacting on work/studies/looking after your family when you’ve suddenly got two months to find somewhere else to live and move. There’s no guarantee you can find somewhere within budget within reasonable commuting distance from work or from your kid’s school so you may have to find a new job or move your kid to a different school. Then there are the costs associated with moving, you have to fork out for letting agents fees yet again, pay another deposit, pay a removal company, have mail redirected etc.

    This is all if a landlord is a bit on the cruel side but still stays within the law, however tenants can be put under pressure by a bad landlord to do things the law doesn’t require of them, such as to move out even sooner than the two month notice period. I’ve known of landlords threatening to withhold the deposit (a spurious reason to withhold it can always be found) or to give a bad reference, making it difficult for the tenant to find somewhere else to live, and thus forcing the tenant to do as they wish.

    None of this necessarily applies to you, but as things stand it’s very much luck of draw as to what kind of landlord you get and it isn’t unreasonable to ask the government to do more to ensure tenants have adequate protection, but you seem to be taking that desire as an affront to your own honour, like the fact you are a good landlord should mean you don’t require governmental oversight.
  • commented 2018-05-22 17:20:12 +0100
    David Morton
    So its Ok for a Limited Company to offset interest costs on borrowing as an expense,but not a Private landlord ?
    Change the goal posts for one,but not the other.
    Very Unfair,but good for the governments corporate chums.
    When PL are eventually forced out and they have control
    Boy,will you see increases!
  • commented 2018-05-22 16:13:54 +0100
    Dear Kevin Dray , whilst I have sympathy with someone who is a good private landlord the truth is the system has been rigged for so long in favour of those who have pursued Buy to let interest only and the small landlord business / investment model and against people at the bottom of society that something has to give. I run a pub and have found from 2000 onwards getting finance for business investment was and continues to be very difficult when returns on BTL and property are guaranteed by the system as long as you have money you can get money and property continues to hoover up the majority of finance. How many BTL landlords are sitting on properties that they could not possibly have bought without the constant ladder of rising house prices and interest only loans ? . Its a giant Ponzi scheme . When investment in property , land and money is more valuable than investment in people energy and enterprise we are on the road to hell. People at the bottom are propping up the profit, living standards and future pensions of people like yourself although I realise you have only played the game by the rules in place . However those rules need to change . Its grossly unfair and economically illiterate. The only thing I would say is if we collapse all the private landlords as well , banks will fail again and that will again serve no-one. We are all stuck in a bind . The only lifeboat available is the slow but sure increase in social housing with affordable rent controls and the slow but sure removal of BTL and interest only as a means of making profit . My only coda to that is people like yourself need to be given time to change direction but we cannot continue as we are . There needs to be rent control , land and wealth taxes introduced , legislation against land banking and a shift towards the kind of society that invest in its people not bricks and money.
  • commented 2018-05-22 15:17:55 +0100
    Will McAllister.
    With all due respect.
    You say 1 is a larger number than 5.
    Err No.
    Why are a growing number of councils screaming out to Private Landlords for help,ask Croydon.
    Simple, A Supply and Demand failure
    Some are being housed in Berni Inns, and this will now get far worse.
    Regulation and protection has to work and be fair both ways,to tenant and landlord.
    A register for all.
    If that means rent caps and longer agreements,that’s fine by me.
  • commented 2018-05-22 15:03:24 +0100
    Fox watcher.
    No,I don’t agree,Private Landlords should be seen as part of the solution,not the problem,not everyone wants to buy as renting is more flexible. Decent ones provide can provide a service to decent tenants its plug the gap.
    Its only minor compared to the whole problem,which is the total lack of housing through government failures to build enough.
  • commented 2018-05-22 14:48:18 +0100
    Kevin Dray, with all due respect, problem landlords have a much greater impact on the lives of their tenants than problem tenants do on their landlords. A problem tenant can leave a landlord out of pocket, a problem landlord can leave a tenant homeless or forced to move far away from where they work and facing the considerable expense of finding another home, and yet landlords currently enjoy far greater protections than tenants do, as successive governments feel those who own the property deserve far greater rights over it than those who live in it.

    You may feel that calls for greater regulation of landlords are unfairly punishing you, someone who plays by the rules, but tenants who have experienced decades of uncertainty over where and how they will live and how much it will cost don’t want to just place their trust that their new landlord is one of the good ones, and sometimes a landlord who can seem good can suddenly change their tune if a problem with the property is reported, or if they have the opportunity to increase their income from the property. So tenants want to know that if things between them and their landlord do deteriorate, then they will be protected.

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Blog

A victory on tenant security, but the campaign continues

After reports in the Sunday papers, late yesterday afternoon the Ministry of Housing published its long-awaited consultation paper on "Overcoming Barriers to Longer Tenancies in the Private Rented Sector".

It allows us a moment to celebrate the first success of the End Unfair Evictions campaign: an acceptance by the government that private tenancy law is failing England's tenants - just as our petition passes 40,000 signatures

Leaving the detail of the policy to one side for now, it is significantly the first time the government has considered a change to tenancy law. Up to now ministers have been talking of merely "encouraging" landlords to offer better terms - while most landlords might do this, a lot of tenants would get no benefit. We have been arguing that we need full reform and, while incentives are still an option, mandatory reform is now on the table.

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Protection from revenge evictions a postcode lottery

This week we launched the End Unfair Evictions coalition with ACORNLondon Renters Union, and New Economics Foundation. We're calling for an end to Section 21, which allows landlords to evict tenants without needing a reason. 

One reason we're doing is that existing protections are not working in practice.

Back in 2014/15, we fought a hard campaign alongside Shelter, GMB Young London and others to give tenants basic protection from eviction when they complained about their landlord. 

The resulting measures in the Deregulation Act 2015 stopped landlords from serving a Section 21 eviction notice to tenants if the council had found hazards in the property and served an appropriate improvement notice on the owner. This protection lasted for 6 months and was meant to give tenants more confidence in getting their landlord to fix health and safety problems, because the landlord can no longer simply retaliate by kicking them out.

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New mayoral strategy develops plans for London's private renters

Two million tenants in London will welcome the fact that getting a fairer deal for private renters is one of the Mayor of London’s five priorities for housing in the London Housing Strategy, which was published at the end of May. Given that Sadiq Khan’s housing powers are highly limited, what is his strategy promising to private renters in London?

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MPs vote to ban fees

The Tenant Fees Bill had its second reading in Parliament on Monday evening, where it was debated at length by MPs before being passed unanimously through to committee stage. All the issues that we’ve raised as a concern – default fees, the deposit cap, enforcement of the ban on letting fees – were brought up by MPs in the course of the debate. 

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What is Section 21 and why does it need to be scrapped?

Landlords can remove tenants without giving a reason. That’s unfair and it needs to change.

Most of England’s 11 million renters are on contracts with fixed terms of six months or a year; after this period has ended, landlords can evict their tenants with just two months’ notice – and without even giving them a reason. These ‘no fault evictions’ were introduced under section 21 of the 1988 Housing Act. Before this, private tenants had much greater security and it was much harder for landlords to evict tenants who paid the rent on time and looked after the property. The government has finally decided to consult on ways of improving renter security, but - while there are some promising aspects to their proposals - they suggest that no-fault evictions will remain. Generation Rent, the New Economics Foundation, ACORN and the London Renters Union are launching a campaign to abolish section 21.

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New staff join the Generation Rent team

We're pleased to announce some big news at Generation Rent - with the award of three new grants, our campaign's future has been secured for the next three years and we have been able to expand the team with two new members of staff.

We also have three new board members, including a new chair, Ian Mulheirn.

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Letting fees ban moves closer - but loophole remains

Good news for hard-pressed private renters facing rip off fees from letting agents.

The Government has introduced the Tenant Fees Bill into Parliament, which aims to ban the fees commonly charged by letting agents for new tenancy agreements. This is part of the Government’s promise to make private renting cheaper and fairer and it’s a much-needed piece of legislation, especially as a quarter of us in the UK will rent privately by 2021.

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Cross-party groups give their verdicts on renting

This week we’ve had two reports from the political mainstream calling for a better deal for renters. They add to the pressure we’ve been putting on the government to improve tenant security – and though we contributed to both, they don’t quite go as far as we’d like.

The first was from the Resolution Foundation, a think tank chaired by Conservative peer David Willetts and run by Torsten Bell, previously adviser to former Labour leader Ed Miliband. 

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Government launches secret landlord blacklist

Landlords get to ask tenants for a reference, but there's no way we can check what a prospective landlord is like. That's why we've long been calling for a central database that names and shames criminal landlords.

From today we've got one. But there's a catch: only local councils can access it.

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Fees ban concerns remain as Bill completes first stage

The Commons Housing Committee has published its report on the Draft Tenants' Fees Bill today, making recommendations to the government for when it formally introduces the Bill to Parliament. 

Generation Rent, along with charities, landlord groups, local councils and other industry organisations, gave evidence to the inquiry earlier in the year. There were positive outcomes on rents and deposits, but more work is needed to make sure the ban covers all fees - and that it's enforced properly.

Here's a summary of what we asked for - and what we got.

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