GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2018-09-22 18:32:25 +0100 · Flag
    Gerry, that’s a really big loophole in the law which I believe there is talk of the government closing. Selling property to family to avoid the liability of being ordered to do something but I might be wrong. The government have back peddled on a lot of proposals lately.

    Whilst the district council may be ignoring you, there should still be action you can take. Including reporting it to environmental health (which is likely your local authority, in your case, the district council) or the Health and Safety Executives (HSE), they’re especially interested in unsafe gas appliances.

    If you search on Facebook for Harry Albert Lettings & Estates and let them know the issues, they will be able to give you better advice and point you in the right direction. Our advice is free (it’s my company), especially when it comes to the health and safety of tenants living in the private rented sector.

    Without bashing your district council, inaction by councils is not unheard of. The state of some of their own properties are very poor.
  • commented 2018-09-22 17:28:58 +0100 · Flag
    Landlord ordered by court to undertake repairs, in 1999 & 2000. Property sold to landlord’s nephew, still waiting for some major repairs, 18 years later. District Council no help, ever.
  • commented 2018-09-20 08:48:32 +0100 · Flag
    I have written several articles, on my blog, about housing and homelessness.
  • commented 2018-09-15 12:51:16 +0100
    Hi Michael, if you’re near the end of the fixed term, you have a legal right to give notice to end the tenancy (at least one month’s notice before the end of the fixed term). Regardless of what your tenancy agreement says.

    Is the tenancy agreement from your landlord or is it direct with an agent? If you’d like, message us on Facebook – just search Harry Albert Lettings & Estates and we will be happy to review your contract for you and explain how to best go about dealing with this.

    We don’t charge for advice and won’t expect any form of payment for helping you. :)
  • commented 2018-09-15 12:47:53 +0100 · Flag
    Hi everyone. I wonder if anyone can help with this…

    I have come across a clause in a rental agreement that says that as tenants we cannot give notice that means we would leave in a four month period each year, as it is ‘difficult to find new tenants’ over that time (mid October to mid February). Is this allowed? It seems to me that we are being imprisoned for a third of the time. I’d welcome your view on whether this would be enforceable, especially as the notice period is only 2 months.

    Thanks

    Mike
  • commented 2018-09-10 12:20:20 +0100 · Flag
    EVERY LANDLORD is required to be helpful ,as old age disability must be addressed not PROFIT regardless of receiving RENTAL income and be BOUND by LAWS AND ethics morals as NHS cannot pay for health RISKS or Tenants POOR HEALTH also so NO NOTICES valid for spiteful LANDLORDS AGENTS etc A TRIBUNAL to decide each CASES on MERITS &COUNCILS CONTROL HELP RE ACCOMODATION also.NO EXCUSES OR DELAYS AT ALL .BE STRICT to RESOLVEE CASES HELP NEEDY OLD PERSONS HUMAN RIIGHTS to APPRECIATE our fortunate circumstances in UK !!THANK YOU >SUBHASH

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Blog

Before you rent: How to protect your legal rights

Finding a flat to rent in England can be tough. The stress only compounds when things don’t go as planned. When I lived in London, I got caught out when my landlord insisted on “renegotiating” the tenancy terms after I had paid a holding deposit (a troublingly common practice in the market).

Here are twelve things tenants can do to protect their rights, which helped me succeed in my legal claim against my landlord.

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Cabinet split over tenancy reform

On Wednesday, the Sun reported that 10 Downing Street and the Treasury are blocking moves to legislate for longer tenancies.

Although the recently closed consultation left open the question of making the new tenancy mandatory or voluntary, the same newspaper had previously reported that the Housing Secretary, James Brokenshire, wanted all tenants to get it.

That sets up a big internal government battle over tenants' rights as the Conservative Party worries more and more about winning over younger voters. 

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Public backs better security for renters

As the consultation period on the government's proposals for longer tenancies draws to a close - the deadline to respond is this Sunday - we are handing in our End Unfair Evictions petition to the Ministry of Housing today. It passed 50,000 signatures on Tuesday, helped along by #VentYourRent.

And if that wasn't enough to make the government pay attention, new polling from Survation finds that our demands have the backing of the wider public, including Conservative voters.

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No-fault evictions drive up homelessness

Section 21 is the leading cause of homelessness. This law allows evictions with no reason needed, and this is one more reason why we should scrap it.

To some extent, this is stating the bleeding obvious. Since 2012, the end of a private tenancy has been the leading cause of homelessness, but until now no one has specifically pointed the finger at Section 21. Today, we've been able to demonstrate it.

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Source: Ministry of Housing

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Proof that millions of renters are failed by unfair rental laws

The latest English Housing Survey was out last week, and the results are further evidence for what we’ve been arguing for years: England’s rental laws are making life insecure and expensive for growing numbers of people.  

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Four early victories for the End Unfair Evictions campaign

It is less than a month since we launched our joint campaign - with ACORN, the New Economics Foundation and the London Renters Union - to end section 21 no-fault evictions, and we've already had some major successes. 

Here are four things we can celebrate already.

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A victory on tenant security, but the campaign continues

After reports in the Sunday papers, late yesterday afternoon the Ministry of Housing published its long-awaited consultation paper on "Overcoming Barriers to Longer Tenancies in the Private Rented Sector".

It allows us a moment to celebrate the first success of the End Unfair Evictions campaign: an acceptance by the government that private tenancy law is failing England's tenants - just as our petition passes 40,000 signatures

Leaving the detail of the policy to one side for now, it is significantly the first time the government has considered a change to tenancy law. Up to now ministers have been talking of merely "encouraging" landlords to offer better terms - while most landlords might do this, a lot of tenants would get no benefit. We have been arguing that we need full reform and, while incentives are still an option, mandatory reform is now on the table.

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Protection from revenge evictions a postcode lottery

This week we launched the End Unfair Evictions coalition with ACORNLondon Renters Union, and New Economics Foundation. We're calling for an end to Section 21, which allows landlords to evict tenants without needing a reason. 

One reason we're doing is that existing protections are not working in practice.

Back in 2014/15, we fought a hard campaign alongside Shelter, GMB Young London and others to give tenants basic protection from eviction when they complained about their landlord. 

The resulting measures in the Deregulation Act 2015 stopped landlords from serving a Section 21 eviction notice to tenants if the council had found hazards in the property and served an appropriate improvement notice on the owner. This protection lasted for 6 months and was meant to give tenants more confidence in getting their landlord to fix health and safety problems, because the landlord can no longer simply retaliate by kicking them out.

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New mayoral strategy develops plans for London's private renters

Two million tenants in London will welcome the fact that getting a fairer deal for private renters is one of the Mayor of London’s five priorities for housing in the London Housing Strategy, which was published at the end of May. Given that Sadiq Khan’s housing powers are highly limited, what is his strategy promising to private renters in London?

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MPs vote to ban fees

The Tenant Fees Bill had its second reading in Parliament on Monday evening, where it was debated at length by MPs before being passed unanimously through to committee stage. All the issues that we’ve raised as a concern – default fees, the deposit cap, enforcement of the ban on letting fees – were brought up by MPs in the course of the debate. 

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