GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2017-11-14 17:01:08 +0000
    There is a solution to the Affodable Housing crisis Low Carbon Construction can help solve it. Take a look at the website and the Affordable Housing Strategy 2018. All that is needed is land, councils and government need to help by helping find land to build on.
  • commented 2017-07-29 20:09:45 +0100
    I am an owner with property for rent in the West Loop Chicago, quite reasonable.
  • commented 2017-07-10 11:23:18 +0100
    Has anyone seen The Week the Landlords Moved In? I caught it the other day and one thing I noticed was that where tenants were living with problems such as damp, exposed pipework, faulty windows/doors etc, the landlords said they never knew and would have fixed it if the tenant had only come to them with the problem.

    The programme didn’t ask the tenants why they hadn’t mentioned the problems to their landlords, but I’m sure we all know the reason why. When your rented accommodation is your home and you can be evicted with two months’ notice without reason you feel that any sort of interaction with your landlord carries an associated risk and just want to keep your head down.

    No matter how good your relationship is with your landlord, you never feel entirely comfortable in your own home, they may seem perfectly nice when everything is going well but you never know how people react when things aren’t going well, and if your landlord has their cold hard business head on then they could just decide that rather than spend money fixing a problem their tenant is complaining about, they’ll just evict the tenant and get someone else in.
  • commented 2017-05-12 23:02:58 +0100
    I’m standing for election in Croydon Central. I’m 26 and was a letting agent for over a year and a half. I know the housing industry very well because of my experience and I’m using the knowledge I’ve gained to help people who are stuck in Generation Rent (myself included). I don’t stand a chance of winning, but if I did – I can guarantee that I will bring housing back under control.

    - Don Locke
  • commented 2017-05-01 17:41:31 +0100
    I am a private renter. I paid a deposit and when I asked back for it, I was told that I need to pay more than 70 % of the deposit for redecoration and cleaning etc. This is a scam from estate agents to rip off renters from their deposits. I lived in the flat for 1 year and three months never made any holes and kept the flat clean and returned it back in the same condition. We should fight against this injustice. Our deposits our hard earned money that we need to put up for another house and some unscrupulous estate agents are taking off that heard earned none from us. What a shame.
  • commented 2017-02-16 11:35:22 +0000
    What if a strike was organised and every renter in London committed to not paying rent for one month?
    What if it was this May, as a message to Theresa May?
    It could be called #Maybenot

    The potential outcome?:

    - As a collective that can strike, private renters can create uncertainty in London’s housing market as a reliable investment vehicle. House prices will drop.
    - It would kill the buy to let market. BTL yields are so low (approx. 3%) that with one month’s loss of rental income, mortgaged landlords would make a loss.
    - Landlords can’t evict 898000 privately rented households- there are only so many bailiffs (UK Government figures for London as of Feb 2016: 898000 Privately rented households, 883000 Owner Occupied. Source: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2016/02/londons-renters-now-outnumber-homeowners/470946/).
    - This worked for students last year- why not for everyone else? https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/sep/17/uk-university-students-rent-strike-rising-cost-accommodation

    Extortionate rents, that private renters pay every month- is what is keeping the whole thing alive.
    As private renters, the only protest that strikes at the heart of the whole greedy, corrupted London housing market is to withhold rent.
    Renters could then save the £1500pm rent towards their own deposit.

    What if?

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Blog

Life in the rental market: what the future holds for older renters

Most debates around housing focus on young adults, the drastic fall in their rate of home ownership and ways to boost the number of first time buyers.

Far less attention, however, is given to the vast numbers of renters who are already too old to get a mortgage and face a lifetime of renting instead. As more of them reach retirement age, the state will start paying more of their rent, and faces enormous costs unless it makes some fundamental changes to the housing market. Because politicians only operate with 5-year horizons, few are fretting about the implications of lifetime renting.

But we are, and today we publish a report co-authored with David Adler of Oxford University: Life in the Rental Market.

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A glimpse of Tory tenancy reform?

An intriguing exchange in the House of Commons this week may contain clues about the government's big forthcoming announcement of reforms to tenancies. 

During a debate on temporary accommodation, the backbench Conservative MP Bob Blackman said this:

The greatest cause of homelessness is the end of an assured shorthold tenancy. They usually run for six months and at the end of that period families often have to move. The solution is clear: we need longer tenancies and more security of tenure for families, but also assurances to landlords that they will get paid their rent and that the tenants will behave themselves in accordance with the contract they have signed. I ask the Minister to update us on where we are going with lengthening tenancies, which would dramatically reduce homelessness at a stroke. Perhaps we can do that.

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Insecure tenancies drag down quality of life

With home ownership unaffordable and council housing unavailable, private renters are living longer in a tenure that wasn't designed to provide long term homes. The constant threat of your landlord deciding to sell up or move back in means that you have none of the stability that a home is supposed to provide.

New polling from Survation, commissioned by us, exposes the impact this has on tenants' lives. It shows that private renters are more anxious about the security of their home and this is holding them back from investing time in their home and their local community. 

Survation.jpg

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Slowly, but surely, a letting fees ban is coming

Almost a year after Phillip Hammond announced the Government's intention to banning letting fees, we now have a draft bill before parliament.

Since that announcement, we have had a consultation on the ban, and of course a new government, but it has remained on the legislative agenda thanks to the concerted campaigning of renters across the country.

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Disrupting the market to help tenants

The internet has already shaken up the music industry, television, taxis and self-catering holidays. Investors are now looking for the next industry to disrupt with technology and property seems ripe for the picking. 

As the national voice of private renters, we agree that the property industry as it stands fails its consumers in too many ways, so things need to change. Even when we succeed in changing the law, like the forthcoming letting fees ban, we still need to ensure that it's implemented properly and the industry adapts in the right way. 

But we can't allow slick and revolutionary new services or initiatives to simply treat tenants as cash cows in the same way that many letting agents and landlords currently do. So this is what we think the market needs - and how the tenant should benefit.

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Lodgers need protection too

Where’s my deposit? It is no joking matter for nearly 300,000 tenants whose landlord has not protected their deposit.

This has left many out of pocket without a clue of how they will manage to raise another deposit - the average amount in London stands at £1040 for their next property.

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Landlord licensing works - yet the government is delaying renewal of the most successful scheme

Since the east London borough of Newham introduced mandatory borough-wide licensing of all private landlords in 2013, improvements in the sector have been indisputable. Criminal landlords are being driven out of the borough, standards and safety in the sector have improved and enforcement has dramatically increased.

Yet with the scheme due to expire on 31 December 2017, government is now more than four weeks overdue in making a decision on approval of a new, five-year scheme, to start in the new year.

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Tory conference announcements pull punches on housing crisis

At the General Election in June, Labour won a majority of the votes of the under-40s. This was a wake-up call for the Conservative Party, many of whose members are now filled with a new urgency to address this cohort's biggest concerns - including a rather large house-shaped one.

Their annual conference has duly been bursting with new housing policies, particularly for private renters. But while they are (for the most part) improvements, the proposals fail to address the urgency of the housing crisis.

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How new rent controls could work

The biggest talking point of Jeremy Corbyn's speech to Labour Party conference this week was rent controls. Since 2014 Labour has been proposing to limit rises in rents during tenancies, but there was something different this time around.

This is what the Labour leader said on Wednesday:

We will control rents - when the younger generation’s housing costs are three times more than those of their grandparents, that is not sustainable. Rent controls exist in many cities across the world and I want our cities to have those powers too and tenants to have those protections.

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Six reasons why today’s renters pay more than previous generations

The harsh reality of the UK’s sometimes savage housing market is that more people are renting their homes until later in life but paying more for the privilege of doing so than their parents did.

In England the number of private renters has increased from two million to 4.5 million between 1999 and 2015 while renting a home has been eating up a steadily increasing proportion of renters’ income, rising from 8% during the late 1960s to over 27% today, on average. Here we look at the key trends driving up rents across the nation in recent years.

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