GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2015-10-09 13:15:05 +0100
    LAST WORD!
  • commented 2015-10-08 21:17:16 +0100
    So, you do all this for the good of those who life has dealt a poor hand, do you? So, no doubt when you sell a property to keep the wolf from the door because you have to pay a tax bill, you donate all profits to charitable causes? Don’t you see how pathetic it sounds? Don’t waste my time……
  • commented 2015-10-08 20:39:05 +0100
    Oh and perhaps you could explain why you are still telling us we are preventing FTBs when we’ve provided irrefutable proof to the contrary? Whilst we are on the subject, what happens to a FTB who is repossessed and wont be housed by the council? Or, for that matter, a council tenant thrown out for non-payment or bad behaviour? In your moronic utopia, they’d all get housed for free in an endless succession of waiting, vacant, social housing would they? But do you know where these people go in the real world, when nobody else wants them? Ah yes, thats right. To those willing to take a chance on them. The ONLY people willing to help them rebuild their lives. The private sector.
  • commented 2015-10-08 20:24:53 +0100
    Poxcatcher. You really are deeply embittered, aren’t you? ‘Cool and reasoned argument’ is incapable of emanating from you and you alone, as you have proven may times. You still haven’t answered a single rational point put by any of us, and sound as though you are putting your fingers in your ears and shouting ‘blah! blah! blah!’ at anyone who says anything vaguely sensible or realistic. What a depressing way to live. Somewhat hypocritically, you whine about being insulted whilst calling us parasites and leeches. Why have you not commented on any of my examples or points about how I have tried to help and encourage FTBs? How is offering my tenants cheap purchase prices to aid them, or backing my friend’s first mortgage, acts of a selfish and greedy individual? Also, you have yet to answer this one, simple, point: if I move to another city for a work placement – say 1 or 2 years – how am I to be accomodated? Is it the council I should call? Should I pay roughly double to triple the daily rate to stay in a Travel Inn? Must I be forced to buy a house where I am working? What if I dont WANT to do any of these things?? Please, please, please DO explain, because no one with a brain cell nor a shred of common sense can understand where or how you think I should live?! I’m waiting…
  • commented 2015-10-08 18:25:08 +0100
    Lost your capacity for cool reasoned argument when confronted with undeniable facts strongly stated, eh, Stephen? I’m not surprised…
  • commented 2015-10-08 15:15:43 +0100
    Foxwatcher Thank you for responding to my post and confirming my earlier comments by resorting to further histrionics and name calling. So sad!!!

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Blog

If London housebuilding is reliant on overseas investment, where do we go from here?

Commissioned in Autumn 2016, the final report of the London Mayor’s investigation into the role of overseas investment in housing was published last week – but its findings can be read in very different ways.

Based on research by the LSE, its major conclusion and argument is that off-plan and pre-sales to the overseas market are integral to the current development model in London – and therefore also key to leveraging more affordable housing through section 106 agreements on those sites. 

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Renters vote - and cause another political upset

The results are in, and the UK's voters have delivered yet another shock.

The dust still has to settle but one thing is already apparent: the votes of renters had an impact yesterday. Twenty of the 32 seats that the Conservatives lost to Labour and the Liberal Democrats had more renters than average. Back at the 2011 census, those 32 seats had an average private renter population of 19% - it was 16% in the country as a whole.

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The choice tomorrow

We haven't been posting much on here for the past few weeks as we have joined forces with ACORN on #RentersVote for the duration of the election. 

There we have analysed each of the 5 UK-wide parties' manifestos and pulled it all together into one big graphic, so you can see what we made of their housing commitments side-by-side.

Policy_matrix.png 

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Save £404 when you move after fees ban

Tomorrow is the final chance to respond to the government's consultation on their proposals to ban letting fees.

Ahead of this we have published our latest research from lettingfees.co.uk, which features in today's Times (£), Guardian and i. We have also published an update to last year's report.

Our main findings are that the government's proposals will save the average tenants £404 when they move, and an average £117 every 6 or 12 months to renew the tenancy.

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3.4m private renters risk losing their vote

With one week until voter registration closes, we've estimated that more than three million private renters in England are at risk of losing their vote at the General Election.

1.8m private renters have moved home since the 2016 Referendum and must therefore register again. Private renters are typically on tenancy agreements of no longer than 12 months and are six times more likely to move in a given year than homeowners.

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Celebrating ingenuity in the property industry

The steam train. The vaccine. The television. The World Wide Web. The tenancy renewal fee.

What connects them all? Each one is an incredibly successful British invention.

Yes, we may no longer have the manufacturing prowess that once sustained all corners of the country, but a certain group of entrepreneurs have exerted their creative minds to produce the £250 photocopy, and are currently raking it in.

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One promise the Prime Minister must keep

Theresa May has broken her word. She ruled out a snap election five times, then called one.

Our question is: what other promises is she going to tear up?

The government is consulting now on proposals to ban letting fees, and the deadline of 2 June is a week before polling day.

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Proposed ban on letting fees unveiled

For four and a half months we've been waiting with bated breath for the government's proposals to ban fees, and today they were unveiled as the government finally launched its consultation.

The policy is no half-measure - tenants will not have to pay fees in connection with their tenancy outside of rent, refundable deposit, holding deposit and extra services they require during the course of the tenancy (e.g. replacing lost keys).

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Generation Rent wins prestigious campaigning award

Last night, Generation Rent was handed the Housing and Homelessness Award at the 2017 Sheila McKechnie Foundation awards in London.

The award was in recognition of our work in the past year to mobilise renters as a political force, which culminated in the government’s announcement of a ban on letting fees in November.

SMK_Award.jpg

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Four new trustees help bolster the organisation

We are pleased to welcome four new trustees who have joined the Generation Rent board since the start of the year.

Daniel Bentley, Sean Cosgrove, Betsy Dillner and Hannah Williams bring with them decades of experience in political communications, financial management, movement building and business development.

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