GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-04-06 11:38:05 +0100
    Sheffield Residential – Agent. The accommodation was first class but complete nightmare trying to get deposit back. Needed documentary evidence of payment of all utility bills and council tax. Electricity company messed up account and Sheffield Residential would not accept this. After almost 12 months reluctantly accepted letters from all service providers. Then took a long while to refund deposit using excuses like “with our accounts”. Would never use them again
  • commented 2016-02-08 10:22:37 +0000
    Foxwatcher, if you are indeed one of those people constrained by the MMR then you have my every sympathy. It’s all very well saying we must control lending but if all it does is prevent perfectly capable people getting on the ladder then it’s a false policy that doesn’t work.

    My good wishes are genuine. Despite me being on the ‘wrong’ side of the fence, Im a huge believer in home ownership and the ability of the young to buy for themselves. I hope you find what you’re looking for. If it makes any difference, I spent 12 years around the 1990s saving for my first deposit – left home at 31! Not ideal I know but we’ve all been there – and that was before consumer BTL even existed! All the best. JR
  • commented 2016-02-07 22:44:34 +0000
    James R, we may indeed not agree on private landlords, but much of what you said in that last post I could have written myself. And your examples of friends with large deposits who can’t get mortgages on sensible properties in their area are ones I very much identify with, shall we say. It IS madness, as you say. I guess if there was a solution, it would’ve been identified and dealt with by now. I’m just trying to make my feelings known on one bit of it that does seem, to me, to have a theoretical solution, fraught with practical difficulties as they may be. Thanks for your best wishes. I appreciate them, and your understanding that there is another point of view here.
  • commented 2016-02-07 21:12:35 +0000
    Foxwatcher. Hmmmm, I’d be inclined to agree on the shared-ownership thing. It’s a very long way from perfect and the problems you mention are very real and widespread. I have some experience here. To what extent are you held back by the Mortgage Market Review? – a good friend of mine has a 50% deposit in a relatively cheap area of the country and still can’t get a loan! Madness. (Similarly, some very wealthy friends can’t get a loan either even though it’s for a small fraction of their cash worth – again, madness).

    We’ll clearly never agree on private renting. In a capitalist, ‘free’ society we pay for everything, even the essentials. The supermarkets, water companies, heating, fuel, even clothes – they all make money out of us, out of essentials, out of stuff many people can’t afford. I see your point on housing, but unless everything goes over to your profit-free utopia, it can’t work.

    Consider my local ‘caring, socialist’ council who charge £7/day to park at the railway station. Ok you don’t HAVE to drive to the station, but most people in reality DO HAVE to. It’s too difficult not to. For a space 12×8′ of plain Tarmac, you have to pay the equivalent of nearly FOUR TIMES as much as one of my fully-equipped and beautiful three bedroom houses. And you get a lot more use out of a house 24 hours a day than you do a square of Tarmac.

    The ‘expense’ is all relative and no one ever really provides anything unless there’s something in it for them. It’s just the way of the world. But if you’re home-hunting, I do wish you well.
  • commented 2016-02-07 18:21:45 +0000
    So you do still support the misery that all millions of people will have inflicted on them then. That’s very telling FW, very telling indeed.

    As for the Chancellor knowing what he is doing, yes we certainly agree on that too, however what he is doing is, it would seem, very far removed from what you think he is doing. I’m afraid you’re blinded by your your passion, to see the truth. In a couple of years time it may dawn on you that you were wrong because the evidence keeps being presented to you and you keep ignoring it.

    No you haven’t at all produced a plan to solve the housing crisis as far as I can see. You want all rental property state owned. That isn’t a plan, it’s not building houses is it? This Government say they’re going to build 400k houses. That isn’t a plan, it’s an aspiration as your desire is. Even if they achieve it then it doesn’t even keep up with demand. How many more refugees will be coming our way to put on extra demand I wonder?

    Under this Government the UK has built less houses in the last 5 years than anytime since the 1920s, apart from the war. If they’d actually had a plan in that time, the building industry would not have suffered the way it has and we’d have a damn site more houses in the country than we have now. And you think Mr O, who has no real experience of any proper job, or has any worthwhile qualifications other than a degree in history, is going to solve this?

    If you really rate him then take a look at this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOhwOzsNd9Q. This is the Chancellor of the Exchequer and he turns up to PM Question TIme in this state. Good grief!
  • commented 2016-02-07 18:01:28 +0000
    James M, it seems I have to spell it out. Please pay attention.

    1) I’m sure the Chancellor knows what he is doing. He has stated it is his intention to remove the inequality between BTLs and OOs. By implication, he wants to stop BTL.

    2) Anyone going into BTL without large long term capital profit as one outcome being apparent to them is too stupid to be allowed to do so. They may dress it up with a variety of other excuses, much as you do, but that’s a main driver.

    3) I have offered my solution to this part of the housing crisis. You may not yet have troubled to read my post of an hour or so ago – I’m sure you will, you like reading thoroughly.

    4) As stated, this is only one aspect. Others, such as immigration, house building programmes, birth rates, local infrastructure etc. are not part of this forum. No doubt you will continue to use them as an excuse for your greed.

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Got opinions about renting? We want them

As part of our work, we want to make sure that we're doing the best we can for renters, and a big part of that is understanding your experiences and hopes for the future. 

The housing crisis is such a complex beast that there are a range of views about how to fix it - and we'd like to know what yours are too.

That's why we are running a survey until mid-August. 

 

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Vent your rent, to music

If, like me, you wish this generation had its own Joe Strummer or Woody Guthrie, writing protest songs about the social challenges of the day - i.e. bad housing* - well, you're in luck. A new choir of private renters in London, called Section 21, is being announced this Saturday at Royal Festival Hall in London. 

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Enjoy the summer - but come back ready to end the London housing crisis

As is so often the case in the week before politicians break for the summer, we’ve had a raft of announcements, predictions and indicators in the last week – including a number of focused reports today from English Housing Survey data.

Coupled with announcements made at yesterday’s Mayoral Question Time (the last until September), private renters in London have a diagnosis and some solutions to ponder over the summer.

But equally, it is hoped that these reports will have brought added impetus to plans being written by the housing team at City Hall, ready to hit the ground running after the summer. 

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Want your letting fees back?

Michael Green is the founder of CaseHub. 

Over the past six months, I have been working with some of the country’s leading barristers to put together a lawsuit that proves how most letting fees in England and Wales are unlawful.

The good news is that they agree.

We now need to take that case to court. The good news is that if it wins, renters will be entitled to get their letting fees back, and in future some of them might be stopped entirely. 

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New PM, new diagnosis of the housing crisis

Before she was fast-tracked to 10 Downing St - in one of many dramatic twists in recent weeks - Theresa May gave us a glimpse of how her housing policy might differ from David Cameron's.

Launching her leadership campaign in Birmingham on Monday, May went further than Cameron has ever done in describing the the damage that house price inflation causes:

"...unless we deal with the housing deficit, we will see house prices keep on rising. Young people will find it even harder to afford their own home. The divide between those who inherit wealth and those who don’t will become more pronounced. And more and more of the country’s money will go into expensive housing instead of more productive investments that generate more economic growth." 

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Open letter from Butterfields tenants: 'We do not intend to give up our homes without fighting'

Private tenants on the Butterfields Estate in London's Waltham Forest are facing evictions from affordable homes they have lived in for years, after they were sold on without their knowledge. Previously owned by a charitable trust that ensured tenancies were secure and affordable, the two streets of homes were bought up by a private business (BE17Ltd) at the start of this year.

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Housing emergency drives 'blue light' workers out of London

There have been a huge number of articles written in the last fortnight about the future of Britain, with many focused on the potential effects on London’s economy of the country leaving the EU.

What must not be lost in these debates, though, is the focus on the structural problems that the city faced before the referendum. One of the most fundamental in recent years has been the fact that London’s housing crisis has forced many professionals out of the city.

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Economic uncertainty means renters need security

We haven't commented on the EU referendum as a debate about the future of the country was all a bit above us. Renters are a mixed bunch and have different reasons for voting Remain or Leave.

Now that the deed is done, we're due a new Prime Minister, probably a General Election in the next year, and several years of negotiations over our relationship with Europe. 

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Sadiq says his plans are "ambitious but realistic"

This week will mark 50 days since Sadiq Khan was elected Mayor of London in an election that was defined by the capital’s housing crisis. Yet since that point private renters (and indeed all Londoners hit by its failed housing system) have had to wait patiently to hear the detail within the Mayor’s commitments.

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Lords debate letting fees ban

When we published our latest research on letting fees in April, we were expecting a long fight to get the issue of banning them back on the political agenda. The Housing and Planning Act, passed in May, contained no changes to the law on fees, and the only area of housing government is currently legislating on concerns planning. 

We didn't have to wait for long though. Olly Grender, a Lib Dem peer, who fought for and won some protections for renters in the Housing Act, was selected to present a private member's Bill. Happily for us, she picked fees.

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