GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-04-06 11:38:05 +0100
    Sheffield Residential – Agent. The accommodation was first class but complete nightmare trying to get deposit back. Needed documentary evidence of payment of all utility bills and council tax. Electricity company messed up account and Sheffield Residential would not accept this. After almost 12 months reluctantly accepted letters from all service providers. Then took a long while to refund deposit using excuses like “with our accounts”. Would never use them again
  • commented 2016-02-08 10:22:37 +0000
    Foxwatcher, if you are indeed one of those people constrained by the MMR then you have my every sympathy. It’s all very well saying we must control lending but if all it does is prevent perfectly capable people getting on the ladder then it’s a false policy that doesn’t work.

    My good wishes are genuine. Despite me being on the ‘wrong’ side of the fence, Im a huge believer in home ownership and the ability of the young to buy for themselves. I hope you find what you’re looking for. If it makes any difference, I spent 12 years around the 1990s saving for my first deposit – left home at 31! Not ideal I know but we’ve all been there – and that was before consumer BTL even existed! All the best. JR
  • commented 2016-02-07 22:44:34 +0000
    James R, we may indeed not agree on private landlords, but much of what you said in that last post I could have written myself. And your examples of friends with large deposits who can’t get mortgages on sensible properties in their area are ones I very much identify with, shall we say. It IS madness, as you say. I guess if there was a solution, it would’ve been identified and dealt with by now. I’m just trying to make my feelings known on one bit of it that does seem, to me, to have a theoretical solution, fraught with practical difficulties as they may be. Thanks for your best wishes. I appreciate them, and your understanding that there is another point of view here.
  • commented 2016-02-07 21:12:35 +0000
    Foxwatcher. Hmmmm, I’d be inclined to agree on the shared-ownership thing. It’s a very long way from perfect and the problems you mention are very real and widespread. I have some experience here. To what extent are you held back by the Mortgage Market Review? – a good friend of mine has a 50% deposit in a relatively cheap area of the country and still can’t get a loan! Madness. (Similarly, some very wealthy friends can’t get a loan either even though it’s for a small fraction of their cash worth – again, madness).

    We’ll clearly never agree on private renting. In a capitalist, ‘free’ society we pay for everything, even the essentials. The supermarkets, water companies, heating, fuel, even clothes – they all make money out of us, out of essentials, out of stuff many people can’t afford. I see your point on housing, but unless everything goes over to your profit-free utopia, it can’t work.

    Consider my local ‘caring, socialist’ council who charge £7/day to park at the railway station. Ok you don’t HAVE to drive to the station, but most people in reality DO HAVE to. It’s too difficult not to. For a space 12×8′ of plain Tarmac, you have to pay the equivalent of nearly FOUR TIMES as much as one of my fully-equipped and beautiful three bedroom houses. And you get a lot more use out of a house 24 hours a day than you do a square of Tarmac.

    The ‘expense’ is all relative and no one ever really provides anything unless there’s something in it for them. It’s just the way of the world. But if you’re home-hunting, I do wish you well.
  • commented 2016-02-07 18:21:45 +0000
    So you do still support the misery that all millions of people will have inflicted on them then. That’s very telling FW, very telling indeed.

    As for the Chancellor knowing what he is doing, yes we certainly agree on that too, however what he is doing is, it would seem, very far removed from what you think he is doing. I’m afraid you’re blinded by your your passion, to see the truth. In a couple of years time it may dawn on you that you were wrong because the evidence keeps being presented to you and you keep ignoring it.

    No you haven’t at all produced a plan to solve the housing crisis as far as I can see. You want all rental property state owned. That isn’t a plan, it’s not building houses is it? This Government say they’re going to build 400k houses. That isn’t a plan, it’s an aspiration as your desire is. Even if they achieve it then it doesn’t even keep up with demand. How many more refugees will be coming our way to put on extra demand I wonder?

    Under this Government the UK has built less houses in the last 5 years than anytime since the 1920s, apart from the war. If they’d actually had a plan in that time, the building industry would not have suffered the way it has and we’d have a damn site more houses in the country than we have now. And you think Mr O, who has no real experience of any proper job, or has any worthwhile qualifications other than a degree in history, is going to solve this?

    If you really rate him then take a look at this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xOhwOzsNd9Q. This is the Chancellor of the Exchequer and he turns up to PM Question TIme in this state. Good grief!
  • commented 2016-02-07 18:01:28 +0000
    James M, it seems I have to spell it out. Please pay attention.

    1) I’m sure the Chancellor knows what he is doing. He has stated it is his intention to remove the inequality between BTLs and OOs. By implication, he wants to stop BTL.

    2) Anyone going into BTL without large long term capital profit as one outcome being apparent to them is too stupid to be allowed to do so. They may dress it up with a variety of other excuses, much as you do, but that’s a main driver.

    3) I have offered my solution to this part of the housing crisis. You may not yet have troubled to read my post of an hour or so ago – I’m sure you will, you like reading thoroughly.

    4) As stated, this is only one aspect. Others, such as immigration, house building programmes, birth rates, local infrastructure etc. are not part of this forum. No doubt you will continue to use them as an excuse for your greed.

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Blog

#ventyourrent: a round-up

On 26th April, we launched a social media campaign called #ventyourrent on Twitter and Tumblr. We asked people to tell us on cardboard, a photo, or just a tweet, what they were paying in rent and what it bought them.

The plan was to get Londoners sharing their worst experiences of renting and generating some solidarity ahead of the Mayoral Election on 5th May. We hoped that seeing the posts would get people thinking about the housing market as a political issue that they could have some influence on. If they did, we had a handy guide for them.

It was the first campaign of its kind that we have attempted and we could not have done it without the energy of a crack team of volunteers*, the guidance of Paolo Gerbaudo of Kings College London, and the inspiration of Pierre-Emmanuel Lemaire, Yasmina Aoun, Cong Bi and Nicola Lotter of Central St Martin's MA Communication Design course.

It was a huge success, generating our biggest media story to date, attracting hundreds of submissions, and surely contributing at least a tiny bit to the highest ever turnout for a London Mayoral Election. 

Now that the dust has settled, we decided to find out what #ventyourrent taught us.

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The new Mayor's in-tray

London has a new Mayor. Sadiq Khan was elected last Thursday with 1.3m votes, the largest personal mandate for any British politician in history. That gives him a lot of clout in implementing his manifesto, whether that's dealing with local councils or the Westminster government. 

Let's remind ourselves what he promised. On our Vote Homes comparison site, Sadiq came in behind the Green Party candidate Sian Berry with more amber policies (ones we felt were okay) than greens (policies we called for). And while he had fewer greens than the Lib Dem, Caroline Pidgeon, he had no policies we thought were terrible (marked red) to Caroline's two (on security and rent levels).

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Finally, Zac and Sadiq go head-to-head on housing

After months of debate and campaigning, the London Mayoral election is imminent. Despite housing being the absolute number one issue of the election, the two frontrunners have not managed to face each other to debate it.

There have been general hustings between Sadiq Khan and Zac Goldsmith, including the Evening Standard and Centre for London debate on 21 April, where, amid heated exchanges on policing, transport and extremism, the only real look-in that housing had simply highlighted the similarities between the candidates: building ambitions, first dibs for Londoners, and refusal to build on the green belt (despite Zac’s desire to paint Sadiq as a park concreter).

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UKIP's answer to London's housing crisis

The final manifesto we're looking at for Vote Homes is UKIP's Peter Whittle's. Like all the other candidates, Peter recognises that housing is the biggest challenge facing London. But unlike the other candidates, he sees the cause as excess demand, rather than a shortage of supply.

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What will George Galloway do for London's renters?

The Respect Party candidate, George Galloway, has set out his manifesto on his home page, and we've updated our candidate comparison on Vote Homes. This is what he is promising London’s renters.

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Caroline Pidgeon sets out housing policies

Caroline Pidgeon, Liberal Democrat candidate for London Mayor, has published her manifesto. We’ve taken a look at what she’d do to fix the housing crisis and how she compares with other candidates so far.

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Letting fees - 10 areas now covered

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This morning we have published six more areas on www.lettingfees.co.uk – Manchester, York, and four more London boroughs – Bromley, Camden, Lambeth and Wandsworth.

Flathunters in those areas can check to see which letting agents are charging the least, and which charge the most. These areas join four already in London, and bring the total number of letting agents covered by our website past 700.

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Sian Berry's pitch to London's renters

The Green Party candidate Sian Berry has already promised to establish a Tenants' Union for London. But what else does she have up her sleeve? She recently published her full manifesto and we've now updated her scorecard on www.votehomes2016.com.

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Zac sets out his stall for renters

The Conservative candidate for London Mayor, Zac Goldsmith, has published his housing manifesto, and we've updated the Vote Homes policy grid with his offer for London's renters.

As the candidate of the governing party in Westminster, it was always going to be interesting to see if he would go any further than current government policy. One of the biggest divides between the Conservatives and the other parties is on security of tenure, and it's safe to say that Zac has stuck his neck out on this, though we're yet to be convinced that renters will benefit from his proposal.

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Renters' Hustings - London Election 2016

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More than a hundred people came to the Renters’ Hustings on Tuesday to hear candidates from five parties tell us what they’ll do for private renters if they’re elected as London Mayor or Assembly Member – a lively discussion chaired brilliantly by Buzzfeed’s Jim Waterson. All five candidates (Sian Berry: Green, Tom Copley: Labour, Joy Morrissey: Conservative, Zack Polanski: Lib Dem and David Kurten: UKIP) said they are private renters themselves, so perhaps they know how, er, ‘special’ it is trying to survive as a private renter in this city.

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