GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2016-09-01 21:26:36 +0100
  • commented 2016-08-24 12:11:14 +0100
    I am interested in setting up a Renter’s Union in Manchester and wanted to connect with any local groups to talk about how I could create something that would work with (not overlap with) Generation Rent. I would also like to speak to someone about why a city wide/region Renter’s Union hasn’t been set up before.

    Kind regards

  • commented 2016-08-16 11:25:35 +0100
    Dear Generation Rent,
    I am a mother with a son in his late twenties who lives in London. He has been ripped off by agents, had to rent some appalling places, and unless I die soon has no chance of buying a place of his own. I am suggesting that you have a ‘old people in support of Generation Rent’ section. There are many older people who, like me, are very worried about the future for their children and who would be prepared to help, march and do whatever to get politicians to start taking this problem seriously.
    C. A. Read
  • commented 2016-08-11 16:37:04 +0100
    In Germany they have already laws to protect tenants. They have tenant associations like, Mieterverein Köln or Mieterverein München. We had already to go against landlords twice and even though it lasted two years but at last we won. All that for 70€ a year. There is a law as well to regulate agency fees, which says the side who ordered the service is paying for it (these are business basics). We hope you could probably look up many things from them, as Germany has many decades experience in renting. Thanks
  • commented 2016-04-06 11:38:05 +0100
    Sheffield Residential – Agent. The accommodation was first class but complete nightmare trying to get deposit back. Needed documentary evidence of payment of all utility bills and council tax. Electricity company messed up account and Sheffield Residential would not accept this. After almost 12 months reluctantly accepted letters from all service providers. Then took a long while to refund deposit using excuses like “with our accounts”. Would never use them again
  • commented 2016-02-08 10:22:37 +0000
    Foxwatcher, if you are indeed one of those people constrained by the MMR then you have my every sympathy. It’s all very well saying we must control lending but if all it does is prevent perfectly capable people getting on the ladder then it’s a false policy that doesn’t work.

    My good wishes are genuine. Despite me being on the ‘wrong’ side of the fence, Im a huge believer in home ownership and the ability of the young to buy for themselves. I hope you find what you’re looking for. If it makes any difference, I spent 12 years around the 1990s saving for my first deposit – left home at 31! Not ideal I know but we’ve all been there – and that was before consumer BTL even existed! All the best. JR

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Top 10 tips to cut your electricity bill

Thomas Karcher runs

With sky-high rents squeezing tenant’s budgets, bills are yet another unwelcome expense. However, it is possible to significantly reduce your electricity bill by following our Top 10 electricity saving tips.

1. Check your electricity tariff

As a tenant you are free to switch electricity suppliers without requiring permission from the landlord. Compare tariffs, duel fuel discounts and payment options to ensure you get the best deal.

Please note some agents try and tie tenants into energy deals with a preferred provider. Generation Rent would like to hear if you have been affected by this.

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The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 2 - tenancies)

In September, following the Mayor’s release of some details for this London Living Rent proposal, we blogged about concerns around how genuinely affordable this new tenure would be, and what was needed to ensure it was part of the solution to London’s housing crisis.

This follow-up piece looks at what wasn’t covered in the first blog – broadly, tenancy types – and how again they might best serve Londoners just looking for somewhere affordable and secure to live.

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Property industry tries to block government's best housing policy

With a new Prime Minister and a new Chancellor heavily modifying their predecessors’ policies on the deficit, “affordable” housing and schools, the property industry is hopeful that the government will pursue similar revisionism on its landlord tax policy.

The Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors this week called on the government to scrap the stamp duty surcharge on buy-to-let and second homes, while landlords have been in the High Court to challenge the withdrawal of mortgage interest tax relief for landlords paying higher rate income tax.

We’ve just learned that there will not be a judicial review of the government’s policy.

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Landlords and mortgages: what do we know?

Whenever you propose reform of private renting, the landlord lobby always says no, because "landlords couldn't afford it". Whether it's asking landlords to cover the cost of letting agent fees, to apply for a licence, to charge controlled rents, or to pay tax on their loans, we're asked to believe that they can't afford it. Then they threaten to raise rents - as if rents haven't already been outpacing inflation since the end of the recession.

This claim assumes that landlords are already paying large amounts of their revenue out again in costs. Some of them are, but we point out that the majority are not, because they don't have a mortgage.

For example, an interest-only mortgage of £150,000 at 4% costs £6000 a year. Rent on the £200,000 property bought with that mortgage might get you £10,000. Two thirds of private rented properties have no mortgage, and thus have significantly lower costs and capacity to absorb new regulatory requirements.

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Don't be fooled: Help to Buy is still dangerous

Yesterday, the Chancellor, Philip Hammond, confirmed that the Help to Buy Mortgage Guarantee scheme would wind up at the end of the year. This was arguably the more controversial of the two Help to Buy schemes announced in the 2013 Budget, but it was originally meant to last only 3 years. And with it gone, we're still left with a Help to Buy loan scheme that is highly counterproductive to any efforts to fix the housing crisis.

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The London Living Rent: Winners, Losers and the Rest of Us (Part 1 – rent levels)

During his recent visit to New York City, the Mayor of London took the opportunity to announce one of his key pre-election pledges for the private rented sector, the London Living Rent.

Doing so while overseas was both surprising and interesting and his visit to New York highlighted the challenges facing the Mayors of both cities.

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London's turning - Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor

Today Generation Rent publishes 'London's Turning: Towards a sustainable private rented sector under the new Mayor', our call on Sadiq Khan to act rapidly and boldly in his response to the capital's housing crisis.

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London's housing costs are driving families away

Today we have called on the Mayor of London to adopt a set of policies that will speed up his efforts to end the capital’s housing crisis.

To remind him what’s at stake, we have uncovered another startling trend that is hurting the city and its people.

Every year the Office for National Statistics releases figures on internal migration – how many people move from one part of the UK to another – and people are moving out of London at an alarming rate.  


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Looking for cheap rent in London? Just become an artist then

Proposals this week to implement cheap rents for London's artists show how the the city's housing crisis makes an absurdity of good intentions, and indicates why a closer link to universality rather than targeting is needed to make renting affordable again in the capital.

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Making overseas investment work for Londoners

The issue of foreign investors pumping money into the London property market has once again been raised by last night’s BBC report on a rise in overseas investment in the outer London boroughs, and how this provides competition for first-time buyers.

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