GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2017-07-29 20:09:45 +0100
    I am an owner with property for rent in the West Loop Chicago, quite reasonable.
  • commented 2017-07-10 11:23:18 +0100
    Has anyone seen The Week the Landlords Moved In? I caught it the other day and one thing I noticed was that where tenants were living with problems such as damp, exposed pipework, faulty windows/doors etc, the landlords said they never knew and would have fixed it if the tenant had only come to them with the problem.

    The programme didn’t ask the tenants why they hadn’t mentioned the problems to their landlords, but I’m sure we all know the reason why. When your rented accommodation is your home and you can be evicted with two months’ notice without reason you feel that any sort of interaction with your landlord carries an associated risk and just want to keep your head down.

    No matter how good your relationship is with your landlord, you never feel entirely comfortable in your own home, they may seem perfectly nice when everything is going well but you never know how people react when things aren’t going well, and if your landlord has their cold hard business head on then they could just decide that rather than spend money fixing a problem their tenant is complaining about, they’ll just evict the tenant and get someone else in.
  • commented 2017-05-12 23:02:58 +0100
    I’m standing for election in Croydon Central. I’m 26 and was a letting agent for over a year and a half. I know the housing industry very well because of my experience and I’m using the knowledge I’ve gained to help people who are stuck in Generation Rent (myself included). I don’t stand a chance of winning, but if I did – I can guarantee that I will bring housing back under control.

    - Don Locke
  • commented 2017-05-01 17:41:31 +0100
    I am a private renter. I paid a deposit and when I asked back for it, I was told that I need to pay more than 70 % of the deposit for redecoration and cleaning etc. This is a scam from estate agents to rip off renters from their deposits. I lived in the flat for 1 year and three months never made any holes and kept the flat clean and returned it back in the same condition. We should fight against this injustice. Our deposits our hard earned money that we need to put up for another house and some unscrupulous estate agents are taking off that heard earned none from us. What a shame.
  • commented 2017-02-16 11:35:22 +0000
    What if a strike was organised and every renter in London committed to not paying rent for one month?
    What if it was this May, as a message to Theresa May?
    It could be called #Maybenot

    The potential outcome?:

    - As a collective that can strike, private renters can create uncertainty in London’s housing market as a reliable investment vehicle. House prices will drop.
    - It would kill the buy to let market. BTL yields are so low (approx. 3%) that with one month’s loss of rental income, mortgaged landlords would make a loss.
    - Landlords can’t evict 898000 privately rented households- there are only so many bailiffs (UK Government figures for London as of Feb 2016: 898000 Privately rented households, 883000 Owner Occupied. Source: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2016/02/londons-renters-now-outnumber-homeowners/470946/).
    - This worked for students last year- why not for everyone else? https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/sep/17/uk-university-students-rent-strike-rising-cost-accommodation

    Extortionate rents, that private renters pay every month- is what is keeping the whole thing alive.
    As private renters, the only protest that strikes at the heart of the whole greedy, corrupted London housing market is to withhold rent.
    Renters could then save the £1500pm rent towards their own deposit.

    What if?
  • commented 2016-12-10 12:39:15 +0000
    Hello, I heard your proposed solutions to the rent market crisis i.e. That more houses need to be built and I disagree. I think the biggest issue is letting agencies being greedy and inflating the prices for no reason, without carrying out repairs or improvements to the flats. We see it all the time in Edinburgh, it’s happened to us twice in a row: we have lived in flats with no heating, damp and shabby furniture and as we move out, the let goes up by 50£ per months while no improvements are made to the flats and the furniture and absence of heating just become more dated and unacceptable. Agencies are all helping each other push prices beyond what people can afford in cities which forces young families out.

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Blog

Landlord licensing works - yet the government is delaying renewal of the most successful scheme

Since the east London borough of Newham introduced mandatory borough-wide licensing of all private landlords in 2013, improvements in the sector have been indisputable. Criminal landlords are being driven out of the borough, standards and safety in the sector have improved and enforcement has dramatically increased.

Yet with the scheme due to expire on 31 December 2017, government is now more than four weeks overdue in making a decision on approval of a new, five-year scheme, to start in the new year.

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Tory conference announcements pull punches on housing crisis

At the General Election in June, Labour won a majority of the votes of the under-40s. This was a wake-up call for the Conservative Party, many of whose members are now filled with a new urgency to address this cohort's biggest concerns - including a rather large house-shaped one.

Their annual conference has duly been bursting with new housing policies, particularly for private renters. But while they are (for the most part) improvements, the proposals fail to address the urgency of the housing crisis.

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How new rent controls could work

The biggest talking point of Jeremy Corbyn's speech to Labour Party conference this week was rent controls. Since 2014 Labour has been proposing to limit rises in rents during tenancies, but there was something different this time around.

This is what the Labour leader said on Wednesday:

We will control rents - when the younger generation’s housing costs are three times more than those of their grandparents, that is not sustainable. Rent controls exist in many cities across the world and I want our cities to have those powers too and tenants to have those protections.

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Six reasons why today’s renters pay more than previous generations

The harsh reality of the UK’s sometimes savage housing market is that more people are renting their homes until later in life but paying more for the privilege of doing so than their parents did.

In England the number of private renters has increased from two million to 4.5 million between 1999 and 2015 while renting a home has been eating up a steadily increasing proportion of renters’ income, rising from 8% during the late 1960s to over 27% today, on average. Here we look at the key trends driving up rents across the nation in recent years.

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Landlord tax evasion - what do we know?

A few weeks ago, the London Borough of Newham revealed that 13,000 local landlords had failed to declare their rental income, prompting estimates that £200m of tax was being evaded in London alone.

Today, Parliament has published an answer from the Treasury Minister Mel Stride to Frank Field, who asked what assessment the government had made of this. The Minister directed him (and us) to this information on tax gaps (pp54-5).

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MPs debate letting fee ban

The ban on letting fees is currently the government's flagship policy to help renters, and we're currently waiting for a draft bill to be published, which follows a consultation that we and hundreds of our supporters responded to.

In the meantime, MPs gave us a taste of how the legislation will proceed in Parliament yesterday morning by debating the subject for the first time since last year's Autumn Statement.

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London Housing - a new opportunity to push for greater security

Delayed from August, this week saw the publication of the London Mayor's draft housing strategy, which is now open for consultation for three months.

Covering all housing policy from leasehold reform to tackling street homelessness, the strategy also has a specific section devoted to the private rented sector. With a quarter of London's children in the private rented sector, and millions of renters living in poverty, we all know how urgently action is needed.

We'll be coming back to parts of the strategy in the coming weeks, but here we just focus on the main headlines for renters.

The strategy builds on the Mayor's manifest commitment and previous public statements, and although the Mayor lacks the powers to fundamentally transform London's PRS, there are nonetheless some steps forward and potential to go further.

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The Other Waitrose Effect - the hidden costs of gentrification

Is a new Waitrose in your neighbourhood a cause for excitement, or a troubling omen for your future in the area? 

A new study reveals that the high-end supermarket is linked with rising evictions of private tenants in areas they open up in.

The analysis, conducted by Oxford University academic David Adler for Generation Rent, found that the arrival of a new store was associated with an increase in the number of evictions of between 25% and 50%.

Waitrose.jpg

Great cheese selection, but will you be around to enjoy it?

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Giving people the right to a safe home

This week saw the introduction of Karen Buck MP's Homes (Fitness for Human Habitation and Liability for Housing Standards) Bill, a private member's bill which will now have its second reading in parliament on Friday 19 January 2018.

The bill seeks to update the law requiring rented homes to be presented and maintained in a state fit for human habitation - updated because the current law only requires this of homes with a rent of up to £80 per year in London, and £52 elsewhere!

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National study finds tenants optimistic but rental market oppressive

Every year the government runs the English Housing Survey. General findings are published in February, then, to the delight of housing geeks, the juicy detail on the different subsections of the market arrives in July. We've taken a look at the findings for 2015-16, published last week.

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