GENERATION RENT campaigns for professionally managed, secure, decent and affordable private rented homes in sustainable communities.

Join us today and help campaign for a better deal for private renters.

How we help

  • hwh-1.pngCall for changes in legislation, strategies, policies and practices to make private housing a better place to live

  • hwh-2.pngStrengthen the voice of private tenants by developing a national network of private renters and local private renters’ groups
  • hwh-3.pngEncourage private renters to set up local groups in their own areas
  • hwh-4.pngWork with affiliates towards achieving the aims of Generation Rent
  • commented 2017-02-16 11:35:22 +0000
    What if a strike was organised and every renter in London committed to not paying rent for one month?
    What if it was this May, as a message to Theresa May?
    It could be called #Maybenot

    The potential outcome?:

    - As a collective that can strike, private renters can create uncertainty in London’s housing market as a reliable investment vehicle. House prices will drop.
    - It would kill the buy to let market. BTL yields are so low (approx. 3%) that with one month’s loss of rental income, mortgaged landlords would make a loss.
    - Landlords can’t evict 898000 privately rented households- there are only so many bailiffs (UK Government figures for London as of Feb 2016: 898000 Privately rented households, 883000 Owner Occupied. Source: http://www.citylab.com/housing/2016/02/londons-renters-now-outnumber-homeowners/470946/).
    - This worked for students last year- why not for everyone else? https://www.theguardian.com/education/2016/sep/17/uk-university-students-rent-strike-rising-cost-accommodation

    Extortionate rents, that private renters pay every month- is what is keeping the whole thing alive.
    As private renters, the only protest that strikes at the heart of the whole greedy, corrupted London housing market is to withhold rent.
    Renters could then save the £1500pm rent towards their own deposit.

    What if?
  • commented 2016-12-10 12:39:15 +0000
    Hello, I heard your proposed solutions to the rent market crisis i.e. That more houses need to be built and I disagree. I think the biggest issue is letting agencies being greedy and inflating the prices for no reason, without carrying out repairs or improvements to the flats. We see it all the time in Edinburgh, it’s happened to us twice in a row: we have lived in flats with no heating, damp and shabby furniture and as we move out, the let goes up by 50£ per months while no improvements are made to the flats and the furniture and absence of heating just become more dated and unacceptable. Agencies are all helping each other push prices beyond what people can afford in cities which forces young families out.
  • commented 2016-09-01 21:26:36 +0100
  • commented 2016-08-24 12:11:14 +0100
    Hi!
    I am interested in setting up a Renter’s Union in Manchester and wanted to connect with any local groups to talk about how I could create something that would work with (not overlap with) Generation Rent. I would also like to speak to someone about why a city wide/region Renter’s Union hasn’t been set up before.

    Kind regards

    Laurence
  • commented 2016-08-16 11:25:35 +0100
    Dear Generation Rent,
    I am a mother with a son in his late twenties who lives in London. He has been ripped off by agents, had to rent some appalling places, and unless I die soon has no chance of buying a place of his own. I am suggesting that you have a ‘old people in support of Generation Rent’ section. There are many older people who, like me, are very worried about the future for their children and who would be prepared to help, march and do whatever to get politicians to start taking this problem seriously.
    Sincerely
    C. A. Read
  • commented 2016-08-11 16:37:04 +0100
    In Germany they have already laws to protect tenants. They have tenant associations like, Mieterverein Köln or Mieterverein München. We had already to go against landlords twice and even though it lasted two years but at last we won. All that for 70€ a year. There is a law as well to regulate agency fees, which says the side who ordered the service is paying for it (these are business basics). We hope you could probably look up many things from them, as Germany has many decades experience in renting. Thanks

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Blog

Four new trustees help bolster the organisation

We are pleased to welcome four new trustees who have joined the Generation Rent board since the start of the year.

Daniel Bentley, Sean Cosgrove, Betsy Dillner and Hannah Williams bring with them decades of experience in political communications, financial management, movement building and business development.

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Housing Greater Manchester

When you mention the housing crisis, people tend to think of London and of campaign groups like Focus E15. There is good reason for this - the capital has experienced the worst excesses of the housing crisis, and the pushback there has been among the most dynamic in the country. Yet London is not alone in having a housing crisis, and in recent years the effects of a dysfunctional housing system have been making themselves felt in Greater Manchester.

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Minimum acceptable living standards in London - and how housing costs cut right through them

This week Trust for London, in conjunction with Loughborough University, published their latest report on a Minimum Income Standard (MIS) for London - with figures updated from their first report in 2015, and with a focus in this research on families.

The MIS compares costs between London and the rest of the UK to show the difference between the minimum needed for an acceptable standard of living - with that minimum based on a list of goods discussed and agreed upon by the public.

We can draw many conclusions from the report, and though it should surprise no one that the cost of housing is a major differential between London and the rest of the UK, the research shows that the rising cost of private rents in the lower end of the market stops a large number of households achieving the MIS.

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Rate your landlord and more on Marks Out Of Tenancy

Ben Yarrow is Founder of Marks Out Of TenancyFor more useful websites for renters, visit our resources page.

Ask anyone who’s renting, everyone’s got a story to share. Whether it’s good, bad or just plain ugly; every renter has had their own experience with a landlord or a letting agent that can give us insight into what can be expected as a potential tenant of theirs.    

Now, while it can be fun to wax lyrical about rental horror stories, we wanted to figure out how this exchange of experiences could be harnessed to the benefit of generation rent - so we created Marks out of Tenancy.

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Home ownership at 30-year low

Just 62.9% of England's population owns their home - the lowest proportion since 1985. And the private rented population now stands at 4.5m households, up on last year and bigger than in 1961, when slum landlords like Peter Rachman were making tenants' lives a misery.

These are the big findings of the English Housing Survey Headline Report, the first of two releases of the government-commissioned survey for 2015-16. 

At this rate, there will be more private renters than mortgage holders in just five years' time. It's already the largest tenure in London.

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Brighton and Bournemouth letting fees - all in one place

Even though the government has promised to ban letting fees, our crowdsourced research project at lettingfees.co.uk continues to build up a picture of renter exploitation around the country. Renters in Bournemouth and Brighton & Hove now have an online comparison of letting fees in their area, which will help them avoid the rogues who are either charging excessive fees or just not publishing theirs.

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Lessons from Germany: tenant power in the rental market

Last month the Institute for Public Policy Research (IPPR) released its report “Lessons from Germany: Tenant power in the rental market”. It examines the relative strength of protection for German renters, and how these benefits might be brought across to England.

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Making housing about immigration continues to be a toxic mix

Back in late 2015, when the details about making landlords check the immigration status of prospective tenants was being debated in parliament, housing and migrant groups repeatedly warned government that this would lead to discrimination, and push vulnerable renters into precarious and hidden housing.

Today a new report from the Joint Council for the Welfare of Immigrants (JCWI) on the 'Right to Rent' scheme confirms that warning, with shocking findings of non-British and non-white renters finding it more difficult to access a new tenancy.

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Government consults on banning orders - renters respond

We have put in our response to the government’s consultation on banning orders – the new mechanism to prevent criminals from operating in the rental market. That’s right, they aren’t banned already.

The government has asked what types of offences should be banworthy, and set a deadline of midnight tonight.

We asked our supporters for their experiences earlier in the week, dozens of you responded, and the feedback has helped shape our response to the government.

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Housing White Paper: where do we stand now?

Well, the Housing White Paper was a massive disappointment. After an exciting glimpse on Sunday of moves to "incentivise" longer tenancies, on Tuesday it became clear that those incentives were existing government subsidies for companies building new homes. Number of beneficiaries: 80,322 (not counting the companies who would have offered longer tenancies anyway).

For the 4.3 million households in existing properties? The vague undertaking to "consider what more we can do to support families already renting privately, while encouraging continued investment in the sector." Which gives little hope to people who don't live with their family and a lot of hope to property speculators.

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